'Antiques Roadshow': Medallion first appraised in 1999 now worth $300,000

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'Antiques Roadshow': George Washington Medallion Brings in Whopping Value

On "Antiques Roadshow," we traveled back to 1999 to Des Moines, where a man brought in a carved medallion of George Washington that was worth some serious money.

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'Antiques Roadshow': Medallion first appraised in 1999 now worth $300,000
This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows Ted Trotta, of Trotta-Bono, Ltd., right, looking at Lisa as she reacts about information about her Spontoon Tomahawk Pipe during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season.(AP Photo/PBS)
This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows a man named Joe holding a Max Brother prop duck during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season. (AP Photo/PBS)
In this Saturday, July 23, 2011 photo, Asian art expert and veteran "Antiques Roadshow." appraiser Lark Mason poses with a collection of Chinese rhinoceros horned cups in Tulsa, Okla. PBS says the collection was judged by Mason to be worth $1 million to $1.5 million, the most valuable item brought in for appraisal in the history of "Antiques Roadshow," which will air its 16th season next year. (AP Photo/WGBH)
A fry glass teapot is one of the many treasures brought to the "Antiques Roadshow" event in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2005. The Antiques Roadshow television series is a result of a summer tour of the United States where experts appraise the prized items people bring for evaluation. (AP Photo/Kim D. Johnson)
Hiromasa Iwasaki looks over Mrs. MacArthur's salt and pepper shaker collection, consisting of over 50 pieces, on display inside the MacArthur Memorial museum as filming takes place for an "Antiques Roadshow" style show at museum, Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2004, in Norfolk, Va. The show called "Kaiun Nandemo Kanteidan" has an audience of 20 million, according to Hiroyuki Hamada, the Old Dominion University professor who helped bring the show here. On Sept. 28, that audience will see a two-hour special on the treasury of Japanese artifacts given to Gen. Douglas MacArthur and his wife, Jean. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, L. Todd Spencer)
Marcelyn, left, and daughter, Stephanie, right, of Monte Sereno, Calif., react to the news when announced that their "Norton Sound Alaska hunting helmet" is appraised to be worth between $65,000 and $75,000, during taping for the PBS-TV show called, "Chubb's Antiques Roadshow - Discovering America's Hidden Treasures," in San Francisco, Saturday, Aug. 9, 1997. The mask, made circa 1800, was picked up by mother and daughter at a flea market. (AP Photo/Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Darryl Bush)
Leigh Keno, antiques expert known for hosting the television show Antiques Roadshow with his twin brother Leslie, looks at the walnut veneer on a lowboy in the home of a Hartford-area antiques collector, February 5, 2010, in West Hartford, Connecticut. His company Keno Auctions will be holding it's inaugural auction in Stamford in May. (Photo by Bettina Hansen/Hartford Courant/MCT via Getty Images)
STOLEN ANTIQUES---10/26/04---Police display some of the 750,000 dollars worth of stolen antiques recovered after raids that lead to the arrests of eight people in Project Antique in Toronto, October 26, 2004. NOTE-NO ONE REALLY KNOWS THE VALUE OR HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF MOST OF THE ITEMS, REALLY NEED THE STOLEN ANTIQUES ROADSHOW TO COME IN. (Photo by Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
Leigh Keno, antiques expert known for hosting the television show Antiques Roadshow with his twin brother Leslie, examines furniture in the home of a Hartford-area antiques collector, February 5, 2010. His company Keno Auctions will be holding it's inaugural auction in Stamford in May. (Photo by Bettina Hansen/Hartford Courant/MCT via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 21, Dan Sillaman (L) white shirt in background, brought in this 1955 Les Paul with P-90 pickups on August 21, 2010. Richard Johnston, holding the Les Paul, is the appraiser for Musical Instruments at this event. Dan and his guitar were selected to be filmed for a later airing of Antiques Roadshow. Dan inherited this Les Paul from his father. Dan said his father had played in local bands that opened for country musician Roy Clark. (Photo by Tracy A Woodward/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 21, Anne Kaiser (C) in white top from Silver Spring found out her antique Marquetry Chest that has been in her family for over 100 years is worth about $5,000 on August 21, 2010. J. Michael Flanigan (L) with Antiques Roadshow gave Anne the appraisal. John Sollo, (R) is also an appraiser for today's Antiques Roadshow. Filming for Antiques Roadshow is going on in background. (Photo by Tracy A Woodward/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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APPRAISER: "There's only a handful of these known."
APPRAISER: "This is probably worth somewhere in the range of between $70,000 and probably about $90,000)
MAN: "Well, that's very interesting."

Lucky for this man (who may just be the most relaxed person we've ever seen on the show), the value for the medallion has gone up over the last 15 years. The estimated value is now closer to between $200,000 and $300,000.



According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, the medallion was carved by Samuel McIntire, who was known as the "Architect of Salem, [Massachusetts]" in the late 1700s.

At the time, Salem was a wealthy community with a booming shipping industry. McIntire was one of the finest architects during this era. Only eight copies of the Washington carvings exist in McIntire's inventory--and the appraiser suggests that this could be one of them.

The city of Salem has several buildings that were designed by McIntire--there is even a dedicated tour for visitors to experience his work firsthand.

But, if you're itching to get your hands on your own Samuel McIntire piece, there is a chair available for auction at Christie's for one easy payment of $663,000.

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