In Gaza, pediatrics wing crowded with war wounded

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Gaza children in hospital
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In Gaza, pediatrics wing crowded with war wounded
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Nour al-Areir , 10, waits for surgery lays at the Shifa hospital to remove shrapnel from her skull from a July 20 Israeli shelling while she was sleeping in her bedroom in the Shijaiyah neighborhood in Gaza City. The pediatrics wing of the largest hospital in the Gaza Strip is filled with the youngest victims of more than two weeks of Israel-Hamas fighting.(AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Marwan Hassanein, 4, rests at the Shifa hospital in Gaza City. Marwan was injured in head and eyes by shrapnel while fleeing with his family on July 20 during Israeli shelling in the Shijaiyah neighborhood. The Israeli military says it is doing its utmost to spare civilians, including by sending evacuation warnings to homes and neighborhoods that are about to be targeted in Israel's air- and ground operation. However, Gaza is densely populated, with 1.7 million people squeezed into a small strip of land on the Mediterranean, leaving little room for escape. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Alaa Bekhit, 8, recovers at Shifa hospital from internal bleeding following an Israeli strike that hit a neighbor's house, in Gaza City. The girl was knocked down on her stomach as she walked down stairs at a temporary residence for her family after they were displaced from the Atatra (Beit Lahia) area of the northern Gaza Strip. The pediatrics wing of the largest hospital in the Gaza Strip is filled with the youngest victims of more than two weeks of Israel-Hamas fighting.(AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Mohammed Albardiny, 7, rests at the Shifa hospital in Gaza City, where he is receiving treatment for shrapnel in his right shoulder as well as his head, which caused a skull fracture. He also has wounds all over his whole body, caused by a July 13 Israeli strike that hit a nearby mosque in Gaza City. A relative holds a piece of shrapnel from the incident. The pediatrics wing of the largest hospital in the Gaza Strip is filled with the youngest victims of more than two weeks of Israel-Hamas fighting.(AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Moath al- Eskafy, 7, plays with a mobile phone at Shifa hospital, in Gaza City. Al-Eskafy was injured in the Shijaiya neighborhood in the wake of a building collapsed after an Israeli strike hit the building on July 20, where he sustained a pelvic fracture. He survived but 9 others were killed in the incident, his family said. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Mohammed Albardiny, 7, rests at the Shifa hospital in Gaza City, where he is receiving treatment for shrapnel in his right shoulder as well as his head, which caused a skull fracture. He also has wounds all over his whole body, caused by a July 13 Israeli strike that hit a nearby mosque in Gaza City. The pediatrics wing of the largest hospital in the Gaza Strip is filled with the youngest victims of more than two weeks of Israel-Hamas fighting. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Nema Abu al-Foul, 2 , who was injured while playing with others in front of her family's house in the Al-Sabra neighborhood of Gaza City in an Israeli missile strike on July 19, recovers at Shifa hospital. The strike hit a nearby building, breaking her nose and fracturing her skull, her family said. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Habiba al-Taban, 6, rests in the Shifa hospital as she recovers from injuries from a July 21 Israeli strike hit the area near family's house in the Zawaydah refugee camp, central Gaza Strip. Her family says she has shrapnel in her liver, kidney and the left side of her back. The United Nations says civilians make up three-fourth of the dead and a majority of the wounded in the 18 day-old Israel-Hamas war. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Mojahed al-Ejla, 8, rests at the Shifa hospital where he is receiving treatment for a fractured skull caused by a July 19 Israeli shelling while he and the family were fleeing from the Shijaiyah neighborhood, in Gaza City. The pediatrics wing of the largest hospital in the Gaza Strip is filled with the youngest victims of more than two weeks of Israel-Hamas fighting. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
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By KHALIL HAMRA

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) - The pediatrics wing of the largest hospital in the Gaza Strip is filled with the youngest victims of more than two weeks of Israel-Hamas fighting.

Palestinian health officials say more than 800 Palestinians have been killed and more than 5,200 wounded by Israeli airstrikes and tank fire aimed at what Israel says are Hamas targets. The United Nations says civilians make up three-fourths of the dead and a majority of the wounded. Among the dead have been at least 192 children and teens age 17 and under, the U.N. says.

The Israeli military says it is doing its utmost to spare civilians, including by sending evacuation warnings to homes and neighborhoods that are about to be hit in Israel's air- and ground operation. However, Gaza is densely populated, with 1.7 million people squeezed into a small strip of land on the Mediterranean Sea, leaving little room for escape.

Israel says the goal of its operation is to destroy Hamas military tunnels under the Gaza-Israel border and to halt rocket fire from Gaza on Israeli communities.

Here are portraits of 11 children recovering from their injuries at Gaza City's Shifa Hospital. They range in age from two to 10. Most were wounded in airstrikes on their homes or neighborhoods, with injuries ranging from a broken pelvis to a broken nose and fractured skull.

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