Air travel a leap of faith for passengers

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Air travel a leap of faith for passengers
An arrival information screen shows the delayed Air Algerie flight 5017 (top) at the Houari Boumediene airport near Algiers, Algeria, Thursday, July 24, 2014. An Air Algerie flight carrying 116 people from Burkina Faso to Algeria's capital disappeared from radar early Thursday over northern Mali and "probably crashed" according to the plane's owner and government officials in France and Burkina Faso. (AP Photo/Sidali Djarboub)
Algerian Transport Minister Amar Ghoul speaks during a press conference in Algiers on July 24, 2014, to announce that the wreckage of the Air Algerie plane missing since earlier in the day had been sighted in Mali, though the information remained to be confirmed. The wreckage of an Air Algerie plane missing since early on July 24 with 116 people on board has been found in Mali near the Burkina Faso border, an army coordinator in Ouagadougou said. 'We have found the Algerian plane. The wreck has been located ... 50 kilometres (30 miles) north of the Burkina Faso border' in the Malian region of Gossi, said General Gilbert Diendiere of the Burkina Faso army. AFP PHOTO/ FAROUK BATICHE (Photo credit should read FAROUK BATICHE/AFP/Getty Images)
Passengers board an Air Algerie plane at the Houari-Boumediene International Airport in Algiers on July 24, 2014. An Air Algerie plane missing since early July 24 over Mali with 116 passengers and crew, including 50 French nationals, on board probably crashed, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said. AFP PHOTO/FAROUK BATICHE (Photo credit should read FAROUK BATICHE/AFP/Getty Images)
Journalists wait for news outside the Spanish Swiftair airline office in Madrid, Spain,Thursday, July 24, 2014. An Air Algerie flight carrying more than 100 people from Burkina Faso to Algeria's capital disappeared from radar early Thursday over northern Mali, officials said. France's foreign minister said no wreckage had been found, but that the plane "probably crashed." More than 50 French were onboard the plane along with 27 Burkina Faso nationals and passengers from a dozen other countries. The flight was being operated by Spanish airline Swiftair, the company said in a statement, and the plane belonged to Swiftair. The flight crew was Spanish. (AP Photo/Paul White)
Soldiers remove debris from the TransAsia Airways flight GE222 crash site on the outlying Taiwanese island of Penghu, Friday, July 25, 2014. Investigators on Friday were examining wreckage and flight data recorders for clues into a plane crash on the island that killed 48 people. Stormy weather and low visibility are thought to have been factors in Wednesday's crash of the twin propeller ATR-72. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
A relative of a victim in the TransAsia Airways flight GE222 crash cries during a funeral service on the Taiwan island of Penghu, Friday, July 25, 2014. Stormy weather on the trailing edge of Typhoon Matmo was the likely cause of the plane crash that killed more than 40 people, the airline said Thursday. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Soldiers prepare to remove debris at the site of TransAsia Airways Flight GE222 crash on the outlying Taiwan island of Penghu, Friday, July 25, 2014. Investigators on Friday were examining wreckage and flight data recorders for clues into a plane crash on the Taiwanese island that killed 48 people. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Portraits of victims in the TransAsia Airways flight GE222 crash are placed above an altar before a funeral service on the Taiwan island of Penghu, Friday, July 25, 2014. Stormy weather on the trailing edge of Typhoon Matmo was the likely cause of the plane crash that killed more than 40 people, the airline said Thursday. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Emergency workers remove the wreckage of crashed TransAsia Airways flight GE222 on the outlying island of Penghu, Taiwan, Thursday, July 24, 2014. Stormy weather on the trailing edge of Typhoon Matmo was the likely cause of the plane crash that killed more than 40 people, the airline said Thursday. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Relatives of victims killed in the TransAsia Airways Flight GE222 crash pray with the victims' portraits during a makeshift ceremony at the crash site on the outlying island of Penghu, Taiwan, Thursday, July 24, 2014. Stormy weather on the trailing edge of Typhoon Matmo was the likely cause of the plane crash that killed more than 40 people, the airline said Thursday. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
A shopper looks at prayer notes for passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 at a shopping mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Thursday, July 24, 2014. The crash of the Malaysian passenger plane over eastern Ukraine a week ago killed all 298 people. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
File - This July 17, 2014, file photo show people walking amongst the debris at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine. Ukraine said the passenger plane was shot down as it flew over the country, killing all 298 people on board. Aviation has suffered one of its worst weeks in memory, a cluster of disasters spanning three continents. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky, File)
A woman places a candle backdropped by pictures of victims of the MH17 air crash during a memorial concert in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Thursday, July 24, 2014. Two military aircraft carrying remains of victims from the Malaysian plane disaster departed for the Netherlands on July 24, while Australian and Dutch diplomats joined to promote a plan for a U.N. team to secure the crash scene which has been controlled by pro-Russian rebels. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A convoy of hearses bearing the remains of passengers and crew killed in the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 makes its way along a highway near Boxtel, Netherlands, Thursday, July 24, 2014. The second flight of two military aircraft carrying remains of victims arrived in the Netherlands on Thursday. The bodies are to be taken to a military barracks in Hilversum, where a team of 25 forensic experts and dozens of support staff began working to identify remains Wednesday evening after coffins of the first flight arrived. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)
PETROPAVLIVKA, UKRAINE - JULY 24: Wreckage of the Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 lies in the road on July 24, 2014 in Petropavlivka, Ukraine. Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was travelling from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur when it crashed in eastern Ukraine killing all 298 passengers. The aircraft was allegedly shot down by a missile and investigations continue to find the perpetrators of the attack. (Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images)
PETROPAVLIVKA, UKRAINE - JULY 24: Vlad, 10, looks at wreckage of the Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 that fell near his family's home on July 24, 2014 in Petropavlivka, Ukraine. Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was travelling from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur when it crashed in eastern Ukraine killing all 298 passengers. The aircraft was allegedly shot down by a missile and investigations continue to find the perpetrators of the attack. (Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON (AP) - Airline travel requires passengers to make a leap of faith, entrusting their lives to pilots, airlines, air traffic controllers and others who regulate air travel.

Even after a week of multiple tragedies in worldwide aviation, "There isn't much that we can do to manipulate how we fly as passengers. But we also shouldn't worry too much," says Phil Derner, founder of the aviation enthusiast website NYC Aviation.

With one passenger plane being shot out of the sky and two crashing during storms, aviation experts said there was no pattern suggesting a huge gap in airline safety measures.

"One of things that makes me feel better when we look at these events is that if they all were the same type event or same root cause. Then you would say there's a systemic problem here, but each event is unique," said Jon Beatty, president and CEO of the Flight Safety Foundation, an airline industry-supported nonprofit in Alexandria, Virginia, that promotes global aviation safety.

Less than 1 in 2 million flights last year ended in an accident that damaged a plane beyond repair, according to the International Air Transport Association. The statistic includes accidents involving cargo and charter airlines in its data as well as scheduled passenger airline flights. This week's aviation disasters have the potential to push airline fatalities this year to over 700 deaths - the most since 2010. And 2014 is still barely half over.

The misfortunes began July 18 when Malaysia Flight 17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine with 298 people on board. It's still uncertain who fired the missile that destroyed the plane, but Ukrainian officials have blamed ethnic Russian rebels, and U.S. officials have pointed to circumstantial evidence that suggests that may be the case.

Global aviation leaders will meet in Montreal next week to initiate discussions on a plan to address safety and security issues raised by the shoot-down of the Malaysia Airlines jet, an aviation official said late Thursday. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to discuss the issue publicly by name.

The shoot-down doubled Malaysia Airlines' losses this year. The mysterious disappearance of Malaysia Flight 370 with 239 people on board in March combined with the destruction of Flight 17 amount to more than twice the total global airline fatalities in all of last year, which was the industry's safest year on record. Ascend, a global aviation industry consulting firm headquartered in London, counts 163 fatalities in 2013 involving passenger-carrying airliners with 14 seats or more.

On Wednesday, a TransAsia Airways plane crashed in Taiwan in stormy weather trailing a typhoon, killing 48 passengers, injuring 10 passengers and crew, and injuring five more people on the ground.

The next day an Air Algerie flight with 116 passengers and crew disappeared in a rainstorm over Mali while en route from Burkina Faso to Algeria's capital. The plane's wreckage was later found near Mali's border with Burkina Faso. The plane was operated for the airline by Swiftair, a Spanish carrier.

Derner said passengers can't do much about the path of their flights, and should leave it to aviation officials to learn the right lessons from the downing of the Malaysian flight.

For all that is out of the passengers' control, though, there are still steps that travelers can take to be well informed, select solid airlines and practice good safety habits.

Some tips:

TRACKING FLIGHTS: FlightAware.com can show what path a specific flight has flown the past few days, which can give passengers an idea of what to expect on their own flight. However, flight plans typically aren't loaded until an hour or two before a flight, and change all the time. Within the United States, passengers can track a flight's planned path with the WindowSeat flight tracker app:http://download.cnet.com/WindowSeat-Lite-Flight-Tracker-Timer/3000-20428...

SAFETY RECORDS: AirSafe.com offers airline-by-airline and model-by-model information on fatal plane crashes and other fatal events. It also shows crashes by regions of the world. Aviation-safety.net, a service of the Flight Safety Foundation, lists recent safety problems, offers information on emergency exits and other safety information, and has a database of safety issues stretching back to 1921.

ASSESSING THE AIRLINE: The European Union keeps a list of airlines that are prohibited from flying there. If an airline makes that list, avoid it. http://ec.europa.eu/transport/modes/air/safety/air-ban/index_en.htm. It's also a good idea to see if a carrier is a member of the International Air Transport Association, the trade association for the world's airlines. If they're not, they might not have met the group's safety standards.http://www.iata.org/about/members/pages/airline-list.aspx

GOOD HABITS: AirSafe.com, run by former Boeing safety engineer Todd Curtis, offers 10 tips for safe flight. These include choosing larger aircraft and nonstop flights. Once onboard: listen to the safety briefing, keep overhead bins free of heavy items, keep seatbelts fastened during flight, listen to flight attendants, don't bring hazardous materials, let flight attendants pour any hot drinks, don't drink too much and keep your wits about you. http://www.airsafe.com/ten_tips.htm

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