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Nashville man uses soda cans in yard to protest construction

East Nashville Man Uses Yard Art To Protest Construction


Owning a home comes with responsibilities: mow the yard, repaint some trim, pull some weeds ... and string up some soda cans? The odd chore has been taken up by one East Nashville man. For him, the sight of newly constructed houses opening across the street was just too much.

WZTV says, "Upset with the looks of these houses, Lucas' father, Glen, decided to turn his property into his neighbors' eye sore." According to his son, Glen Hames worked in construction for many years and can spot poor work when he sees it. But does that really call for a giant wind chime made of Diet Coke cans?

After all, so far there don't appear to be any nightmarish neighbors. And no one is in danger of getting hit with a falling tree toilet like they were at this El Paso County, Colorado home. KSAZ says, "They are demanding that a couple of toilets and a sink be taken down off that tree." Not to mention the complete lack of dandelion fields, which DNAInfo Chicago says are apparently taking over Chicago Gov. Pat Quinn's yard. And isn't it nice that his new neighbors will probably have a yard?

Before ruining your own lawn to make a point, you might also consider legal action. A neighbor of architect Louis Cherry was successful in convincing the city of Raleigh, North Carolina, to reverse its approval on Cherry's building permit.

But if soda cans are the only way, might we suggest some aluminum can art?

It is worth noting not everyone is against the new construction in East Nashville. Other residents are happy that their property value could go up from the new homes. The Hames family is looking for more empty cans to create more decorations.

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