Dutch PM: 1st victims should be home Wednesday

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Dutch PM: 1st victims should be home Wednesday
Members of Ukraine's emergency services put on protective suits as they prepare to unload newly retrieved bodies into a refrigerated train in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. International indignation over the incident has grown as investigators still only have limited access to the crash site and it remains unclear when and where the victims' bodies will be transported. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A man wearing a gas mask climbs on a truck unloading newly retrieved bodies into a refrigerated train in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. International indignation over the incident has grown as investigators still only have limited access to the crash site and it remains unclear when and where the victims' bodies will be transported. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
Peter Van Vilet, team leader of Holland's National Forensic Investigations Team speaks to media after inspecting a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of passengers in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. International indignation over the incident has grown as investigators still only have limited access to the crash site and it remains unclear when and where the victims' bodies will be transported. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A woman stares at a a pro-Russian rebel outside the railway station where a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of passengers is stationed in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. International indignation over the incident has grown as investigators still only have limited access to the crash site and it remains unclear when and where the victims' bodies will be transported. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A pro-Russian rebel walks as members of the OSCE mission to Ukraine and Holland's National Forensic Investigations Team inspect a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of passengers in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. International indignation over the incident has grown as investigators still only have limited access to the crash site and it remains unclear when and where the victims' bodies will be transported. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A man covers his face with a rag due to the smell, as deputy head of the OSCE mission to Ukraine Alexander Hug, center right, stands outside a refrigerated train as members of Netherlands' National Forensic Investigations Team inspect bodies, seen in plastic bags, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. International indignation over the incident has grown as investigators still only have limited access to the crash site and it remains unclear when and where the victims' bodies will be transported. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A pro-Russian rebel stands outside the railway station after members of the OSCE mission to Ukraine and Holland's National Forensic Investigations Team inspected a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of passengers in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. International indignation over the incident has grown as investigators still only have limited access to the crash site and it remains unclear when and where the victims' bodies will be transported. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
Dana, the German shepherd patrols with a pro-Russian rebel next to a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of passengers in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
Peter Van Vilet, team leader of Netherlands' National Forensic Investigations Team exits a carriage while inspecting a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of passengers moved from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, located 15 kilometers (9 miles) away, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A man walks next to a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of victims, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Armed rebels forced emergency workers to hand over nearly 200 bodies recovered from the Malaysia Airlines crash site and had them loaded Sunday onto refrigerated train cars bound for a rebel-held city, Ukrainian officials and monitors said.(AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
An armed pro-Russian rebel secures the area next to a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of victims, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Sunday, July 20, 2014. Armed rebels forced emergency workers to hand over all 196 bodies recovered from the Malaysia Airlines crash site and had them loaded Sunday onto refrigerated train cars bound for a rebel-held city, Ukrainian officials and monitors said.(AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
An armed pro-Russian rebel, wearing a t-shirt that depicts a Russian soldier during the Crimea annexation, secures the area next to a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of victims, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Sunday, July 20, 2014. Armed rebels forced emergency workers to hand over all 196 bodies recovered from the Malaysia Airlines crash site and had them loaded Sunday onto refrigerated train cars bound for a rebel-held city, Ukrainian officials and monitors said.(AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
An armed pro-Russian rebel speaks to the driver of a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of victims, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Sunday, July 20, 2014. Armed rebels forced emergency workers to hand over all 196 bodies recovered from the Malaysia Airlines crash site and had them loaded Sunday onto refrigerated train cars bound for a rebel-held city, Ukrainian officials and monitors said.(AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
Armed pro-Russian rebels walk next to a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of victims, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Sunday, July 20, 2014. Armed rebels forced emergency workers to hand over all 196 bodies recovered from the Malaysia Airlines crash site and had them loaded Sunday onto refrigerated train cars bound for a rebel-held city, Ukrainian officials and monitors said. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A man gestures next to a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of victims of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, Sunday, July 20, 2014. Armed rebels forced emergency workers to hand over all 196 bodies recovered from the Malaysia Airlines crash site and had them loaded Sunday onto refrigerated train cars bound for a rebel-held city, Ukrainian officials and monitors said. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
Dana, the German shepherd patrols along with a pro-Russian rebel next to a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of passengers in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Monday, July 21, 2014. Another 21 bodies have been found in the sprawling fields of east Ukraine where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was downed last week, killing all 298 people aboard. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
A woman looks at a refrigerated train loaded with the bodies of victims, in Torez, eastern Ukraine, 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, Sunday, July 20, 2014. Armed rebels forced emergency workers to hand over all 196 bodies recovered from the Malaysia Airlines crash site and had them loaded Sunday onto refrigerated train cars bound for a rebel-held city, Ukrainian officials and monitors said. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
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THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) - The Dutch prime minister says his government aims to have the first bodies of victims of the downed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 back in the Netherlands on Wednesday.

Mark Rutte said Tuesday that a plane is ready to bring the first remains back from the Ukrainian government-controlled town of Kharkiv, where they arrived early Tuesday in a refrigerated train.

He said that, "it is our aim - and at the moment our expectation - that sometime tomorrow the first plane carrying victims will leave for Eindhoven."

Rutte said that the identification of some bodies will be quick. But he has warned grieving families of victims of Thursday's crash that killed 298 people that the identification of some others could take "weeks or even months."

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