Jose Canseco wishes 'Juiced' never happened

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Jose Canseco wishes 'Juiced' never happened
OAKLAND, CA - JULY 19: Jose Canseco #33 of the 1989 Oakland A's joins his teammates as they celebrate their World Series championship 25 years ago, before a game against the Baltimore Orioles at O.co Coliseum on July 19, 2014 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - JULY 19: Jose Canseco #33 of the 1989 Oakland A's celebrates their World Series championship 25 years ago, before a game against the Baltimore Orioles at O.co Coliseum on July 19, 2014 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Brad Mangin/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - JULY 19: Jose Canseco #33 of the 1989 Oakland A's celebrates their World Series championship 25 years ago, before a game against the Baltimore Orioles at O.co Coliseum on July 19, 2014 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Brad Mangin/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - JULY 19: Jose Canseco #33 gets a pat on the back from Tony Phillips #18 of the 1989 Oakland A's as they celebrate their World Series championship 25 years ago, before a game against the Baltimore Orioles at O.co Coliseum on July 19, 2014 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)
Former Oakland Athletic Jose Canseco (33) is welcomed by the team, including first base coach Tye Waller (46) during a pre-game ceremony honoring the reunion of players from the 1989 world championship team prior to the baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles Saturday, July 19, 2014, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Oakland Athletics Jose Canseco, right, bashes elbows with teammate Mark McGwire following Cansecos solo homerun in the third inning of game two of the World Series against the Cincinnati Reds, Wednesday, Oct. 17, 1990, Cincinnati, Ohio. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Former major league baseball player Jose Canseco points to a t-shirt that apologizes to Mark McGwire for outing him as a performance enhancing drug user during the Los Angeles Dodgers' baseball game against the St. Louis Cardinals, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
Former baseball player Jose Canseco, right, talks with his attorney, Jayne Weintraub, after a hearing Monday, July 21, 2003, in circuit court in Miami. Canseco will remain in jail until at least next month after a judge delayed a decision Monday on whether the former slugger violated probation and should go to prison for 15 years.(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, POOL)
Former Philadelphia Eagle Vince Papale, center, holds up Jose Canseco arm as the judges decision is read following a celebrity boxing match with against Danny Bonaduce, left, in Aston Pa. on Saturday Jan. 24, 2009. The celebrity boxing match ended in a deflating majority draw. (AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek)
Former baseball star Jose Canseco gestures as he testifies in court as Judge Herbert Stettin listens Tuesday, April 19, 2005, in Miami. Canseco is named in a lawsuit filed by two men involved in an altercation on Halloween night 2001 at a Miami Beach bar called Opium Garden. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
Former baseball player Jose Canseco warms up before his celebrity boxing match against Danny Bonaduce on Saturday, Jan. 24, 2009, in Aston, Pa. (AP Photo/ Joseph Kaczmarek)
Jose Canseco is seen outside federal court in Washington, Thursday, June 3, 2010. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Jose Canseco talks with reporters after appearing in federal court in Washington, Thursday, June 3, 2010. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
FILE - This Jan. 7, 2010, file photo shows former Major League baseball pitcher Roger Clemens at the BCS Championship NCAA college football game between Alabama and Texas in Pasadena, Calif. Former slugger Jose Canseco is expected to maintain his support for Roger Clemens before a federal grand jury. Canseco arrived Thursday morning, June 3, 2010, in Washington to testify in U.S. District Court. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Jose Canseco arrives at the ALMA Awards on Thursday, Sept. 17, 2009, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Dan Steinberg)
Tampa Bay Devil Rays slugger Jose Canseco, left, gets a massage from teammate Ozzie Guillen as the two leave the field after the Devil Rays defeated the Oakland Athletics 6-4 Tuesday night, May 23, 2000, at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. Canseco knocked in two runs with a seventh-inning single. He is also the subject of trade rumors, possibly going to the New York Yankees. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
FILE - In this March 17, 2005 file photo, former Oakland Athletic and Texas Ranger baseball player Jose Canseco testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, to examine the use of steroids in baseball. Las Vegas police are investigating a woman's allegations that Canseco sexually assaulted her, according to officials Wednesday, May 22, 2013. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, file)
Jose Canseco kisses his seven-year-old daughter Josie, as they arrive at the HBO All Star Family Sports Jam, held to benefit the Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles, Saturday, June 19, 2004,at the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, Calif. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
New York Yankees runner Jose Canseco looks on in disbelief after home plate umpire Ted Barrett called him out after being tagged by Tampa Bay Devil Rays catcher Mike DiFelice during the second inning Thursday night Sept. 28, 2000 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. Canseco tried to score from first on a double by teammate Tino Martinez. Martinez was called out a few moments later trying to score from third on a wild throw. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
Boston Red Sox' Jose Canseco reacts after being called out on strikes during third inning action Saturday, March 2, 1996, in Fort Myers, Fla. as Minnesota Twins catcher Greg Myers fires the ball back to pitcher Jose Para. Canseco missed two days of workouts this week to deal with a legal situation in Miami. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
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By GLENN MINNIS
XN Sports

Jose Canseco has doubts. Not so much about the truthfulness or validity of what he revealed and said but whether if it truly was in the best interest of any of the parties involved, especially Jose Canseco.

It was back in 2005 when Canseco brazenly blew the whistle on teammates and Major League Baseball at large by detailing the identities of many of those he suspected of being some of the game's biggest performance enhancing drug cheats in his 2005 tome "Juiced."

"I regret writing the book," Canseco told SF.Gate.com. "I regret putting my friends in the book even though it was a true account of what happened. The reason I did it was not a good reason. My anger toward Major League Baseball for not being able to find a job at the end of my playing career really overwhelmed me."

It's true everyone not named Bud Selig that somehow came to be connected with baseball's darkest chapter seems to have paid a steep price for their association. One-time Canseco teammates Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro, Jason Giambi, Ivan Rodriguez and Juan Gonzalez were all fingered by him and have never been able to quite live down the accusations, not to mention been asked to forward any of their personal memorabilia to a quaint but colorful museum nestled in Cooperstown.

"I looked up to McGwire," Canseco reflected of his one-time Bash Brother as he prepared to take the field Friday to celebrate the team's 25-year anniversary of their 1989 World Series title. "I idolized him for a lot of reasons, the guy who was on the field; the guy who was off the field. It haunts me till today that I actually said those things about him, even though they were true, but I could've gone about it a different way and got my point across."

Later this month, Canseco is set to turn 50 years old, though to look at him you probably couldn't tell it. The still muscular and somewhat athletic slugger is now on an eight-week tour of minor-league ballparks competing in home run hitting contests.

Still, the fast and accelerated lifestyle doesn't stop Canseco from taking the time needed to ponder and reflect about all that's been.

"I wish I never used chemicals or steroids," he said. "But I don't see how back then, when I was 19 or 20, how I could've avoided the situation. There was no testing. No rules about it. Teams, organizations and coaches never said don't use it. I wish I never encountered the individual who said you'd be bigger, faster, and stronger if you use those chemicals."

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