Gender of firstborn affects divorce rate?

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Couples With Daughters More Likely To Get Divorced

Families with firstborn daughters are, statistically, slightly more likely to get divorced and that's because fathers prefer sons. If you think that sounds ridiculous, you're not alone. Scientists at Duke University set out to disprove the theory once and for all.

In a press release Amar Hamoudi said, "Many have suggested that girls have a negative effect on the stability of their parents' union. We are saying "Not so fast."

Turns out the University is on to something. Their research reveals that the higher divorce rates are not a case of dad's preferring boys. Rather, a case of girls just being more kick ass.

According to the study, the quote 'robustness of female embryos' is attributed to more females being able to survive a stressful pregnancy. Those stressors could be caused by a problematic relationship and thus females may be more likely to be born into marriages that are on the rocks.

And, it doesn't end there. Hamoudi and the study's co-author Jenna Nobles a sociologist from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, compared data from 1979 to 2010 that reveals women are tougher than men at every age from birth until 100. To put it a bit simpler: men die at a faster rate than women.

According to the World Health Organization's 2014 annual report the average life expectancy for a girl born in 2012 is 73 years of age and a boy only 68 years of age. The US fares a bit better with life expectancy but is still in line with the findings of the study. According to the W-H-O girls in the US born in 2012 have a life expectancy of 81 and boys, 76.

Hamoudi and Nobles, the authors of the study, plan to expand their research beyond divorce. And I am going to call my parents to complain about them stressing me out in the womb before their divorce.

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