Christie aide: I didn't alert bosses about jams

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Christie aide: I didn't alert bosses about jams
NEWARK, NJ - MAY 01: U.S. Attorney for New Jersey Paul J. Fishmanon speaks at a press conference May 1, 2015 in Newark, New Jersey. Former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, David Wildstein, pleaded guilty to the misuse of Port Authority property and to the violattion of the civil rights of Fort Lee residents in the George Washington Bridge case. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - MAY 01: U.S. Attorney for New Jersey Paul J. Fishmanon speaks at a press conference May 1, 2015 in Newark, New Jersey. Former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, David Wildstein, pleaded guilty to the misuse of Port Authority property and to the violattion of the civil rights of Fort Lee residents in the George Washington Bridge case. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
David Wildstein, a former ally of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, right, listens as his lawyer Alan Zegas speaks to the media outside federal court in Newark, New Jersey, U.S., on Friday, May 1, 2015. Wildstein pleaded guilty to conspiring to create traffic jams near the George Washington Bridge to punish a local mayor. Photographer: Louis Lanzano/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEWARK, NJ - MAY 01: High school students demonstrate outside the United States District Court May 1, 2015 in Newark, New Jersey. Former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, David Wildstein, pleaded guilty to the misuse of Port Authority property and to the violattion of the civil rights of Fort Lee residents in the George Washington Bridge case. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - MAY 01: U.S. Attorney for New Jersey Paul J. Fishmanon speaks at a press conference May 1, 2015 in Newark, New Jersey. Former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, David Wildstein, pleaded guilty to the misuse of Port Authority property and to the violattion of the civil rights of Fort Lee residents in the George Washington Bridge case. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - MAY 01: Attorneys Michael Baldassare speaks with the media outside the United States District Court May 1, 2015 in Newark, New Jersey. Former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, David Wildstein, pleaded guilty to the misuse of Port Authority property and to the violattion of the civil rights of Fort Lee residents in the George Washington Bridge case. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
LIVINGSTON, NJ - MAY 01: Bridget Anne Kelly, Governor Christie's former deputy chief of staff, attends a press conference in Eisenhower Conference Center May 1, 2015 in Livingston, New Jersey. Former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, David Wildstein, pleaded guilty to the misuse of Port Authority property and to the violattion of the civil rights of Fort Lee residents in the George Washington Bridge case. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
LIVINGSTON, NJ - MAY 01: Attorney Michael Critchley speaks at a press conference at the Eisenhower Conference Center May 1, 2015 in Livingston, New Jersey. Former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, David Wildstein, pleaded guilty to the misuse of Port Authority property and to the violation of the civil rights of Fort Lee residents in the George Washington Bridge case. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
Regina Egea, left, listens to a question as she appears before the legislative panel investigating politically motivated traffic jams, Thursday, July 17, 2014, in Trenton, N.J. Egea, Gov. Chris Christie's pick to be his next chief of staff, is set to be the fifth person from his administration to appear before a joint legislative committee investigating politically motivated traffic jams. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Regina Egea, left, answers a question as she appears before the legislative panel investigating politically motivated traffic jams, Thursday, July 17, 2014, in Trenton, N.J. Egea, Gov. Chris Christie's pick to be his next chief of staff, is set to be the fifth person from his administration to appear before a joint legislative committee investigating politically motivated traffic jams. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Regina Egea, left, listens to a question along with Attorney Michael Martinez as she appears before the legislative panel investigating politically motivated traffic jams Thursday, July 17, 2014, in Trenton, N.J. Egea, Gov. Chris Christie's pick to be his next chief of staff is set to be the fifth person from his administration to appear before a joint legislative committee investigating politically motivated traffic jams. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Regina Egea laughs at a comment as she appears before the legislative panel investigating politically motivated traffic jams, Thursday, July 17, 2014, in Trenton, N.J. Egea, Gov. Chris Christie's pick to be his next chief of staff, is set to be the fifth person from his administration to appear before a joint legislative committee investigating politically motivated traffic jams. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Regina Egea is sworn in as she appears before he legislative panel investigating politically motivated traffic jams Thursday, July 17, 2014, in Trenton, N.J. Egea, Gov. Chris Christie's pick to be his next chief of staff is set to be the fifth person from his administration to appear before a joint legislative committee investigating politically motivated traffic jams. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Regina Egea, left, talks with Attorney Michael Martinez as she waits to appear before he legislative panel investigating politically motivated traffic jams, Thursday, July 17, 2014, in Trenton, N.J. Egea, Gov. Chris Christie's pick to be his next chief of staff, is set to be the fifth person from his administration to appear before a joint legislative committee investigating politically motivated traffic jams. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
New Jersey Senate President Stephen M. Sweeney, left, D-West Deptford, N.J., looks on as Regina Egea waits to appear before he legislative panel investigating politically motivated traffic jams Thursday, July 17, 2014, in Trenton, N.J. Egea, Gov. Chris Christie's pick to be his next chief of staff is set to be the fifth person from his administration to appear before a joint legislative committee investigating politically motivated traffic jams. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Regina Egea, left, covers a microphone as she listens to attorney Michael Martinez as she appears before the legislative panel investigating politically motivated traffic jams Thursday, July 17, 2014, in Trenton, N.J. Egea, Gov. Chris Christie's pick to be his next chief of staff is the fifth person from his administration to appear before a joint legislative committee investigating politically motivated traffic jams. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
FILE In this Tuesday, June 24, 2014 file photograph, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie addresses a gathering in Trenton, N.J., after he signed into law a bill that would extend the cap on arbitration awards to New Jersey's police and firefighters. The New Jersey state Senate has confirmed the two men Christie wants to add to the board of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. The Senate confirmed John Degnan and George Laufenberg for the jobs just hours after both were advanced by the Senate judiciary committee following hearings. (AP Photo/Mel Evans,file)
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie answers questions from Bob Schieffer of CBS News at the 2014 Fiscal Summit organized by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation in Washington, Wednesday, May 14, 2014. Lawmakers and policy experts discussed America's long term debt and economic future. (AP Photo)
Former aide to Gov. Chris Christie, Christina Renna, testifies in Trenton, N.J., Tuesday, May 6, 2014, before New Jersey lawmakers probing the George Washington Bridge lane closures scandal. A legislative committee is investigating who was behind the politically motivated order to close lanes leading to the bridge last September. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
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By GEOFF MULVIHILL

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) - An aide to Gov. Chris Christie said Thursday that she did not alert any of her bosses when she learned about the closure of lanes leading up to the George Washington Bridge in part because she believed someone else was trying to get to the bottom of it.

Regina Egea testified before a legislative panel that is investigating the closures, which appear to have been carried out for political retribution and have become a major distraction for Christie, a possible 2016 Republican presidential contender.

She was forwarded an email last September from Patrick Foye, executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, ordering that the lanes be reopened and suggesting that their closure may have broken the law.

Egea said the authority's deputy director, Christie appointee Bill Baroni, called her, explained the situation and then forwarded the email from Foye.

Assemblyman John Wisniewski, a co-chairman of the committee, asked her if she thought closing lanes was something the Port Authority might be involved with. She said it was.

"That they would do traffic studies, absolutely, and that they world look for ways to enhance the customer experience," said Egea, who said she normally would not get involved with what she called operational issues at the independent and semi-independent authorities she oversees such as the Port Authority, the New Jersey Turnpike Authority and New Jersey Transit.

She said she understood the accusations from Foye, an appointee of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, as part of a dispute between the two states' contingents, something that was common.

She also said she did not feel a need to investigate further because Foye was reviewing what happened.

Egea is the fifth member of Christie's administration to testify before the legislative panel, but she may be the last for a while.

She was one of 13 people on a list of potential witnesses the committee compiled last month. Wisniewski said the U.S. attorney's office, which is also probing what happened, advised the lawmakers' lawyer not to call about half the people on the list, at least for now.

No one else has been sent a subpoena to appear and no other committee hearings are scheduled.

Before Thursday's hearing, Republicans lawmakers reiterated their concerns that the legislative probe is focused on politics rather than fact-finding and that it's not accomplishing anything.

"It appears that the U.S. attorney is trying to turn off the John Wisniewski show," Republican Assembly Leader Jon Bramnick said. "But John Wisniewski doesn't want to turn off the lights."

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