Blagojevich files new argument in appeal

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

13 PHOTOS
Rod Blagojevich Appeal
See Gallery
Blagojevich files new argument in appeal
FILE - In this March 15, 2012 file photo, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich waves as he departs his Chicago home for Littleton, Colo., to begin his 14-year prison sentence on corruption charges. On Tuesday, March 11, 2014, the 7th U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago said transcripts of FBI wiretaps not played at Blagojevich's corruption trials will remain sealed. The court is still mulling its decision on the imprisoned former Illinois governor's request to toss his convictions. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
FILE - In this March 14, 2012 file photo, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich speaks to the media outside his home in Chicago, as his wife, Patti, wipes away tears a day before he was to report to a prison in Littleton,. Colo., to begin a 14-year prison sentence on corruption charges. Prosecutors and attorneys for Blagojevich disagree over unsealing wiretap transcripts that are part of the imprisoned former governor's appeal of his conviction. The U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals had said it would open the records Monday., Feb. 3, 2014. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich stopped at Freddy's Frozen Custard & Steakburgers before turning himself in to the Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) Englewood just a few minutes away in Littleton, Colorado, to begin his 14-year prison sentence on corruption charges Thursday, March 15, 2012. The 55-year-old Democrat becomes the second Illinois governor in a row to go to prison for corruption. Joe Amon, The Denver Post (Photo By Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, center, walks with attorneys as he arrives at the Federal Correctional Institution Englewood in Littleton, Colo., on Thursday, March 15, 2012, where he began serving his 14-year sentence for corruption. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
FILE - This Dec. 9, 2008 Department of Justice file booking photo shows Rod Blagojevich following his arrest in Chicago. The former Illinois governor is scheduled to the Federal Correctional Institution Englewood in Littleton, Colo., March 15, 2012, to begin serving a 14-year sentence for corruption. He will be identified as No. 40892-424 in prison and his life will be strictly regimented. The Democrat will have to work an eight-hour-a-day menial job and he'll be subject to half a dozen head counts a day. (AP Photo/Department of Justice, File)
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich reaches over a railing to shake supporters' hands after his scheduled address to reporters Wednesday, March 14, 2012, in Chicago. The 55-year-old Democrat is due to report to a prison in Colorado on Thursday to begin serving a 14-year sentence, making him the second Illinois governor in a row to go to prison for corruption. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich acknowledges his supporters after speaking to the media Wednesday, March 14, 2012 in Chicago. The 55-year-old Democrat is due to report to a prison in Colorado on Thursday to begin serving a 14-year sentence, making him the second Illinois governor in a row to go to prison for corruption. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich leaves his home with his daughter Annie before his scheduled address to reporters and his eventual departure for a medium-security facility in Littleton, Colo., for his 14-year sentence on corruption charges, that include his attempt to sell President Barack Obama's former Senate seat. Wednesday, March 14, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2011 file photo, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich speaks to reporters as his wife Patti looks on at the federal building in Chicago after being sentenced for 14 years on 18 corruption counts. On Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2011, U.S. District Judge James Zagel agreed to allow Blagojevich to report to prison March 15. He previously was ordered to begin on Feb. 16. Zagel also agreed to recommend that Blagojevich be sent to the Englewood prison in Colorado. Federal prison officials have the final say. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
FOR USE AS DESIRED, YEAR END PHOTOS - FILE -In this Dec. 7, 2011 file photo, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich leaves the federal building with his wife Patti, right, in Chicago after being sentenced for 14 years on 18 corruption counts, including trying to auction off President Barack Obama's old Senate seat. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
In this Dec. 7, 2011 file photo, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, left, speaks to reporters as his wife, Patti, center, listens at the federal building in Chicago, after being sentenced to 14 years on 18 corruption counts, including trying to auction off President Barack Obama's old Senate seat. Blagojevich's retrial, convictions and sentencing was voted the No. 1 news story in Illinois for 2011 by members of The Associated Press and the wire service's staff. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
CHICAGO - MARCH 14: Disgraced former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich kisses his wife Patti during a news conference outside his home March 14, 2012 in Chicago. Blagojevich must report to a federal prison in Colorado by tomorrow, to start serving a 14-year term he received for his conviction on numerous counts of fraud and corruption including attempting to sell the vacant U.S. Senate seat held by then Senator Barack Obama. (Photo by Frank Polich/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


CHICAGO (AP) - Rod Blagojevich's lawyers have submitted an additional argument on why an appeals court in Chicago should overturn the convictions of the imprisoned former governor.

Jurors convicted the Democrat on multiple corruption counts, including that he tried to swap an appointment to President Barack Obama's old Senate seat for campaign money or a job.

Wednesday's two-page filing with the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals refers to an April Supreme Court decision striking down laws that restrict aggregate limits on campaign contributions.

Defense lawyers say that ruling also indicated the solicitation of contributions was corruption only when a politician gave a clear promise to take some official action in exchange for the donation. They say Blagojevich never made such promises.

Prosecutors are expected to file a response in the coming days.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners