200 tons of Syrian chemicals in UK for destruction

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200 tons of Syrian chemicals in UK for destruction
Contractors work on the the Field Deployable Hydrolysis System (FDHS) onboard the M/V Cape Ray in the cargo bay of the ship January 2, 2014, in Portsmouth, Virginia. The Field Deployable Hydrolysis System is a transportable modular demilitarization system designed to render chemical warfare material into compounds not usable as weapons, and it will be used to destroy the Syrian chemical weapons stockpile. AFP PHOTO / Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
The M/V Cape Ray (L), where the Field Deployable Hydrolysis System (FDHS) is stored in the cargo bay, rests in the water with its sister ships January 2, 2014, in Portsmouth, Virginia. The FDHS is a transportable system designed to render chemical warfare material into compounds not usable as weapons, and it will be used to destroy the Syrian chemical weapons stockpile. AFP PHOTO / Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
MUNSTER, GERMANY - MARCH 05: A container that will be used to destroy chemical weapons from Syria is pictured during a press day at the GEKA facility on March 5, 2014 in Munster, Germany. GEKA is federally-funded and its sole function is the destruction of chemical weapons from military arsenals. Syria agreed to give up its chemical weapons last August and disposal, which is already underway on an American ship in the Mediterranean, is scheduled to be completed by June. (Photo by Nigel Treblin/Getty Images)
MUNSTER, GERMANY - MARCH 05: Workers wear protective clothing during a press day at the GEKA facility on March 5, 2014 in Munster, Germany. GEKA is federally-funded and its sole function is the destruction of chemical weapons from military arsenals. Syria agreed to give up its chemical weapons last August and disposal, which is already underway on an American ship in the Mediterranean, is scheduled to be completed by June. (Photo by Nigel Treblin/Getty Images)
MUNSTER, GERMANY - MARCH 05: A Worker in protective clothing checks the cover of a dummy grenade during a press day at the GEKA facility on March 5, 2014 in Munster, Germany. GEKA is federally-funded and its sole function is the destruction of chemical weapons from military arsenals. Syria agreed to give up its chemical weapons last August and disposal, which is already underway on an American ship in the Mediterranean, is scheduled to be completed by June. (Photo by Nigel Treblin/Getty Images)
MUNSTER, GERMANY - MARCH 05: Destroyed ammunition is stored in a container during a press day at the GEKA facility on March 5, 2014 in Munster, Germany. GEKA is federally-funded and its sole function is the destruction of chemical weapons from military arsenals. Syria agreed to give up its chemical weapons last August and disposal, which is already underway on an American ship in the Mediterranean, is scheduled to be completed by June. (Photo by Nigel Treblin/Getty Images)
In this photo dated Tuesday, May 13, 2014, taken from aboard the Danish warship "Esbern Snare", as in the background the containers containing Syria's dangerous chemical weapons, on the Danish cargo ship, Ark Futura, transporting the chemical weapons out of the strife-torn country, in Cyprus coastal waters. Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons director general Ahmet Uzumcu said Monday, June 23, 2014, the final shipment of stockpiled chemical weapons has been loaded onto Danish and Norwegian ships for transportation out of Syria.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
In this photo taken Tuesday, May 13, 2014, Danish soldiers onboard the Danish warship "Esbern Snare" as in the background the Norwegian cargo ship with containers transporting the chemical weapons out of the strife-torn country, in Cyprus coastal waters. Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons director general Ahmet Uzumcu said Monday, June 23, 2014, the final shipment of stockpiled chemical weapons has been loaded onto Danish and Norwegian ships for transportation out of Syria.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
A Danish soldier onboard the Danish warship "Esbern Snare" as in the background Danish cargo ship Ark Futura transports yria's dangerous chemical weapons out of the strife-torn country, out of Cyprus coastal city of Larnaca, on Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Denmark’s foreign minister Martin Lidegaard is urging Syria to give up the last of its chemical weapons agents in the next few days in order to meet a June 30 deadline for completely ridding the war-torn country of its lethal stockpile. A Danish-Norwegian flotilla consisting of two warships and two cargo vessels has been moving the chemicals out of Syria for eventual destruction since January. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, May 13, 2014, the containers carrying Syria's dangerous chemical weapons, on the Danish cargo ship, Ark Futura, transporting the chemical weapons out of the strife-torn country, in Cyprus coastal waters. Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons director general Ahmet Uzumcu said Monday, June 23, 2014, the final shipment of stockpiled chemical weapons has been loaded onto Danish and Norwegian ships for transportation out of Syria.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
Students hold a banner reading 'No to decisions taken from above, Gioia tells you Enough !' during a rally in Gioia Tauro, southern Italy, to protest against the arrival in the harbour of a ship transporting chemical weapons from Syria on January 25, 2014. The impending arrival by sea of Syrian chemical weapons has led to widespread protests in southern Italy. The toxic cargo is due to be transfered between a Danish vessel and an America ship and then destroyed at sea in international waters but they have to use a port at Gioia Tauro valley in Calabria. AFP PHOTO/MARIO TOSTI (Photo credit should read MARIO TOSTI/AFP/Getty Images)
HATAY, TURKEY - APRIL 4 : Group of Syrian people mostly women led by a female Syrian chemical engineer make gas masks with plastic bottle, wood charcoal, paper cup and cotton in Hatay, Turkey on April 4, 2014. Syrians fled to Turkey due to civil war make gas masks and send them to Syria in case of any chemical weapons attack by Assad forces . (Photo by Erdal Turkoglu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
HATAY, TURKEY - APRIL 4 : Group of Syrian people mostly women led by a female Syrian chemical engineer make gas masks with plastic bottle, wood charcoal, paper cup and cotton in Hatay, Turkey on April 4, 2014. Syrians fled to Turkey due to civil war make gas masks and send them to Syria in case of any chemical weapons attack by Assad forces . (Photo by Erdal Turkoglu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 24: The view of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 24, 2014. Nuclear Security Summit will be held March 24-25, with the attenders of over 53 countries in the Hague. Security forces take extra security precautions prior to the meeting. (Photo by Mehmet Kaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
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LONDON (AP) - A 200-ton shipment of Syrian chemicals once stockpiled to make weapons has arrived in Britain where it will be destroyed.

A Ministry of Defense spokesman on Tuesday described the materials as no more dangerous than industrial chemicals and said they were in Britain after a long operation to disable Syria's chemical weapons capability.

Syria finished handing over its 1,300 tons of chemical stockpiles in June in an effort to avoid U.S. airstrikes threatened after a chemical attack on a rebel-held suburb near Damascus was believed to have killed more than 1,000 people. The chemicals are being disposed of at sites in various countries.

Britain's Royal Navy played a role in escorting the shipments, part of an operation overseen by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

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