Shipwrecked Concordia floated for tow to Genova

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Shipwrecked Concordia floated for tow to Genova
A picture shows the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship starting being lifted out of water during an operation to refloat the boat on July 14, 2014 off the Giglio Island. Over two and a half years after it crashed off the island of Giglio in a nighttime disaster which left 32 people dead, the plan is to raise and tow away the 114,500-tonne vessel in an unprecedented and delicate operation for its final journey to the shipyard where it was built in the port of Genoa. AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture shows the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship starting being lifted out of water during an operation to refloat the boat on July 14, 2014 off the Giglio Island. Over two and a half years after it crashed off the island of Giglio in a nighttime disaster which left 32 people dead, the plan is to raise and tow away the 114,500-tonne vessel in an unprecedented and delicate operation for its final journey to the shipyard where it was built in the port of Genoa. AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture shows the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship starting being lifted out of water during an operation to refloat the boat on July 14, 2014 off the Giglio Island. Over two and a half years after it crashed off the island of Giglio in a nighttime disaster which left 32 people dead, the plan is to raise and tow away the 114,500-tonne vessel in an unprecedented and delicate operation for its final journey to the shipyard where it was built in the port of Genoa. AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
ISOLA DEL GIGLIO, ITALY - JULY 14: The wrecked ship Costa Concordia with is seen during the refloating operations on July 14, 2014 in Isola del Giglio, Italy. On the first day of the operation the wreck will be partially refloated by 2 metres from the platfoms that support it and will then be moved approximately 30 metres to the east. The wreck will be held in position by tugs and moored by anchors with steel cables. The refloating operation is expected to take up to a week before the wreck is towed to the port of Genoa for dismantling. (Photo by Laura Lezza/Getty Images)
ISOLA DEL GIGLIO, ITALY - JULY 14: Titan-Micoperi workers make their way out to the wrecked ship Costa Concordia to begin the refloating operation, on July 14, 2014 in Isola del Giglio, Italy. On the first day of the operation the wreck will be partially refloated by 2 metres from the platfoms that support it and will be moved approximately 30 metres to the east. The wreck will then be held in position by tugs and moored by anchors aft, with steel cables. The refloating operation is expected to take up to a week before the wreck is towed to the port of Genoa for dismantling. (Photo by Laura Lezza/Getty Images)
People chat outside the control room aboard the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship during an operation to refloat the boat on July 14, 2014 off the Giglio Island. Over two and a half years after it crashed off the island of Giglio in a nighttime disaster which left 32 people dead, the plan is to raise and tow away the 114,500-tonne vessel in an unprecedented and delicate operation for its final journey to the shipyard where it was built in the port of Genoa. AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
GIGLIO PORTO, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 22: A general view of the uprighted Costa Concordia is seen on September 22, 2013 in Giglio Porto, Italy. The search will be resumed for the missing bodies of Maria Grazia Tricarichi and Russsel Rebello, whose bodies were never found after the Costa Concordia capsized on January 13, 2012, leaving 32 people dead. Specialist divers from the coastguard, fire brigade and police will search the area between the righted ship and the coast and other parts of the vessel which were previously off limits. (Photo by Laura Lezza/Getty Images)
ISOLA DEL GIGLIO, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 18: Part of the previously submerged, severely damaged right side of the Costa Concordia cruise ship is seen in upright position on September 18, 2013 in Isola del Giglio, Italy. The vessel, which sank on January 12, 2012, was successfully righted during a painstaking operation yesterday morning. The ship will eventually be towed away and scrapped. It was the first time the procedure, known as parbuckling, had been carried out on a vessel as large as Costa Concordia. (Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images)
A view of the wreck of Italy's Costa Concordia cruise ship after emerging from water on September 17, 2013, near the harbour of Giglio Porto. Salvage operators in Italy lifted the Costa Concordia cruise ship upright from its watery grave off the island of Giglio in the biggest ever project of its kind. The ship was upright for the first time since the January 13, 2012 tragedy, and led to applause and cheers in the port, in a dramatic climax to the massive salvage operation. Local residents and survivors spoke of an eerie feeling as the ship rose, saying the sight reminded them of the tragedy that claimed 32 lives. AFP PHOTO / ANDREAS SOLARO (Photo credit should read ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images)
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GIGLIO, Italy (AP) - The shipwrecked Costa Concordia was successfully refloated Monday in preparation to be towed away for scrapping, 30 months after it struck a reef and capsized, killing 32 people.

Authorities expressed satisfaction that the operation to float the Concordia from an underwater platform had proceeded without a hitch. Technicians were preparing to shift it some 30 meters (yards) and then anchor the massive cruise ship before ending the day's operations.

The entire operation to remove the Concordia from the reef and float it to Genova, where it will be scrapped, will cost a total of 1.5 billion euros ($2 billion), Costa Crociere SpA CEO Michael Tamm told reporters.

The heavily listing ship was dragged upright in a daring maneuver last September, and then crews fastened huge tanks to its flanks to float it. Towing is set to begin July 21. It's about 200 nautical miles (320 kilometers) to Genova and the trip is expected to take five days.

"The operation began well, but it will be completed only when we have finished the transport to Genova," Italian Environment Minister Gian Luca Galletti told reporters Monday.

Concordia's Italian captain is being tried in Tuscany for manslaughter, causing the shipwreck and abandoning ship before all were evacuated.

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