Perry-Paul launch foreign policy war of words

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Rick Perry - updated 8/19/2014
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Perry-Paul launch foreign policy war of words

Texas Gov. Rick Perry was booked Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, on two felony counts for allegedly carrying out political threats.

(Image courtesy: Travis County Sheriff's Office)

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, center, arrives at the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, in Austin, Texas. Perry has been booked on two felony counts of abuse of power for carrying out a threat to veto funding to state public corruption prosecutors. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, center, is booked at the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, in Austin, Texas. Perry has been booked on two felony counts of abuse of power for carrying out a threat to veto funding to state public corruption prosecutors. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry talks to the media and supporters after he was booked at the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, in Austin, Texas. Perry was indicted last week on charges of coercion and official oppression for publicly promising to veto $7.5 million for the state public integrity unit run. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, left, leaves the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center after he was booked, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, in Austin, Texas. Perry was indicted last week on charges of coercion and official oppression for publicly promising to veto $7.5 million for the state public integrity unit run. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry talks to the media and supporters after he was booked at the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, in Austin, Texas. Perry was indicted last week on charges of coercion and official oppression for publicly promising to veto $7.5 million for the state public integrity unit run. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry talks to the media and supporters after he was booked at the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, in Austin, Texas. Perry was indicted last week on charges of coercion and official oppression for publicly promising to veto $7.5 million for the state public integrity unit run. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Gov. Rick Perry makes a statement in Austin, Texas on Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 concerning the indictment on charges of coercion of a public servant and abuse of his official capacity. Perry is the first Texas governor since 1917 to be indicted. (AP Photo/Michael Thomas)
Gov. Rick Perry makes a statement in Austin, Texas on Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 concerning the indictment on charges of coercion of a public servant and abuse of his official capacity. Perry is the first Texas governor since 1917 to be indicted. (AP Photo/Michael Thomas)
Gov. Rick Perry makes a statement in Austin, Texas on Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 concerning the indictment on charges of coercion of a public servant and abuse of his official capacity. Perry is the first Texas governor since 1917 to be indicted. (AP Photo/Michael Thomas)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry casts his vote in the Cast you Kernel competition at the Iowa State Fair, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, in Des Moines, Iowa. The fair runs through Aug. 17th. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry walks on the main concourse before speaking at the Des Moines Register's Political Soapbox at the Iowa State Fair, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, in Des Moines, Iowa. The fair runs through Aug. 17th. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry walks on the main concourse before speaking at the Des Moines Register's Political Soapbox at the Iowa State Fair, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, in Des Moines, Iowa. The fair runs through Aug. 17th. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks at the Des Moines Register's Political Soapbox at the Iowa State Fair, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, in Des Moines, Iowa. The fair runs through Aug. 17th. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks at the Des Moines Register's Political Soapbox at the Iowa State Fair, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, in Des Moines, Iowa. The fair runs through Aug. 17th. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Governor Rick Perry pauses as he addresses attendees at the 2014 Red State Gathering, Friday, Aug. 8, 2014, in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry gives a thumbs-up to supporters before speaking at the Des Moines Register's Political Soapbox at the Iowa State Fair, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, in Des Moines, Iowa. The fair runs through Aug. 17th. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Gov. Rick Perry makes a statement in Austin, Texas on Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 concerning the indictment on charges of coercion of a public servant and abuse of his official capacity. Perry is the first Texas governor since 1917 to be indicted. (AP Photo/Michael Thomas)
Texas Governor Rick Perry waits to greet US President Barack Obama in Dallas, Texas, on July 9, 2014 as he arrives for a meeting with local elected officials and faith leaders to discuss the urgent humanitarian situation at the Southwest border. Obama requested $3.7 billion in emergency funding from Congress to help cope with a surge of unaccompanied child immigrants from Central America. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, LA - MAY 31: Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks during the final day of the 2014 Republican Leadership Conference on May 31, 2014 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Some of the biggest names in the Republican Party made appearances at the 2014 Republican Leadership Conference, which hosts 1,500 delegates from across the country through May 31. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, LA - MAY 31: Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks during the final day of the 2014 Republican Leadership Conference on May 31, 2014 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Some of the biggest names in the Republican Party made appearances at the 2014 Republican Leadership Conference, which hosts 1,500 delegates from across the country through May 31. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Texas Governor Rick Perry waits to greet US President Barack Obama in Dallas, Texas, on July 9, 2014 as he arrives for a meeting with local elected officials and faith leaders to discuss the urgent humanitarian situation at the Southwest border. Obama requested $3.7 billion in emergency funding from Congress to help cope with a surge of unaccompanied child immigrants from Central America. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
This Aug. 8, 2014, photo shows Governor Rick Perry as he speaks at the 2014 Red State Gathering, in Fort Worth, Texas. The Associated Press has tracked the movements and machinations of more than a dozen prospective presidential candidates including Perry. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks to reporters following a fund-raising breakfast for Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, Thursday, May 29, 2014, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Rick Perry arrives at the Champions of Jewish Values International Gala at Cipriani 42nd Street on Sunday, May 18, 2014 in New York. (Photo by Scott Roth/Invision/AP)
Gov. Rick Perry gives a speech during the Texas GOP Convention in Fort Worth, Texas on Thursday, June, 5, 2014. In his address, the longest-serving governor in the state's history focused more on the future and national issues than his political legacy at home. (AP Photo/Rex C. Curry)
FILE - In this April 23, 2014 file photo Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks in New York after trying to convince companies to move their operations to Texas. If Perry opts to make a second presidential run, his business-friendly policies in Texas will be his main selling points. But back home, members of his own party seem poised to dismantle key parts of his legacy. Among the targets: the special state funds Perry used to attract top employers to Texas. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks to the media after meeting with business owners Wednesday, April 23, 2014, at a barbecue restaurant in New York. Perry, a Republican, made the trip to try to convince companies to move their operations to Texas, where he says the business climate is friendlier. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Gov. Rick Perry gives a speech during the Texas GOP Convention in Fort Worth, Texas on Thursday, June, 5, 2014. In his address, the longest-serving governor in the state's history focused more on the future and national issues than his political legacy at home. (AP Photo/Rex C. Curry)
File - In this May 28, 2013, file photo Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks in Austin, Texas. Perry waded into Missouri's political battle over taxes Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, endorsing an uphill effort by Republican legislators to override Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of an income tax cut. Perry plans to make a personal appearance next week in Missouri to tout Texas' business-friendly environment. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Gov. Rick Perry speaks during a ceremonial signing of a water fund bill, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, in Austin, Texas. The legislative session ended Monday, but Perry immediately called lawmakers back for a special session. They have 30 days to approve new voting maps, though the governor will likely add more items to the agenda. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
President Barack Obama, right, talks with Texas Gov. Rick Perry as they walk on the tarmac during his arrival on Air Force One at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, Thursday, May 9, 2013 in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Jack Plunkett)
FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2013 file photo, Texas Gov. Rick Perry addresses the opening session of the 83rd Texas Legislature in Austin, Texas. Perry announced Wednesday, April 17, 2013, that he is heading to Illinois to recruit businesses to relocate to Texas. He will spend one night in Chicago from April 23-24 meeting with business leaders in the biotechnology and financial industries. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Texas Gov, Rick Perry, speaks at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md., Thursday, March 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks to reporters after a speech Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Dallas. In his speech to business leaders, Gov. Perry outlined how he would continue pressing for spending some of the state's reserves on water and transportation projects. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry looks over papers as he arrives at the Texas Capitol to deliver the state of the state address, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2013 file photo, Gov. Rick Perry delivers the state of the state address in the house chambers at the state capitol, in Austin, Texas. With nearly two million illegal immigrants and a 1,200-mile border with Mexico, Texas has more at stake than most states in the renewed push to overhaul the nation's immigration system. Yet so far, Perry and Republicans who control the Legislature have been conspicuously sitting this debate out. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, right, shakes hands after addressing the opening session of the 83rd Texas Legislature, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry casts his vote in the Cast you Kernel competition at the Iowa State Fair, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, in Des Moines, Iowa. The fair runs through Aug. 17th. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry walks on the main concourse before speaking at the Des Moines Register's Political Soapbox at the Iowa State Fair, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, in Des Moines, Iowa. The fair runs through Aug. 17th. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
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NEW YORK (AP) - Two leading Republicans have begun an unusually personal war of words over foreign policy, highlighting a broader divide within the GOP over international affairs in one of the first public clashes of the Republican Party's presidential primary process.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul on Monday lashed out at his Republican colleague Texas Gov. Rick Perry's weekend charge that Paul's "isolationist" views are dangerous. Paul, a tea party favorite, responded by taking a swipe at Perry's fashion accessories in an article published in Politico Magazine entitled, "Rick Perry is dead wrong."

"Apparently his new glasses haven't altered his perception of the world, or allowed him to see it any more clearly," wrote Paul.

Paul continued: "With 60,000 foreign children streaming across the Texas border, I am surprised Governor Perry has apparently still found time to mischaracterize and attack my foreign policy."

Both men are seriously considering running for president in 2016, but the Republican-on-Republican attack is rare so soon before the GOP primary process begins. While Paul has already begun to hire staff in early voting states like Iowa and New Hampshire, presidential candidates aren't likely to begin campaigning in earnest until next year.

With conflicts escalating across the globe, foreign policy is poised to become a key issue in the race - especially as the GOP begins to embrace a libertarian shift on national security and foreign affairs.

Paul has emerged as a leading voice among conservative activists who favor a dramatically smaller U.S. footprint on the international stage. Perry and others, including Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, support a more aggressive leadership role for the United States, despite polls suggesting that voters have grown war-weary after prolonged military action in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The intra-party split caught the attention of former Vice President Dick Cheney, who offered a warning on Monday for people who might be tired of war or "don't want to be bothered."

"There is a growing, emerging threat to the United States," he said at a Washington event hosted by Politico. "And in terms of trying to deal with it on a global basis, we're the only ones who can lead that effort. Nobody else can, nobody else will."

Appearing at the same event, Liz Cheney addressed Paul's views directly: "I've got some big concerns about the extent to which Sen. Paul seems to think we can be safe if we just come home and try to build a fortress America. That's clearly not going to work."

Paul, meanwhile, has spent much of the last year working to distinguish his views from those of his father, 2012 presidential candidate Ron Paul, who delighted libertarians by calling for the closure of U.S. military bases around the world. The younger Paul does not consider himself an isolationist, but opposes sending any more troops to Iraq.

"If refusing to send Americans to die for a country that refuses to defend itself makes one an 'isolationist,' then perhaps it's time we finally retire that pejorative," he wrote. "Today, the overwhelming majority of Americans don't want to send U.S. soldiers back into Iraq. Is Perry calling the entire country 'isolationist' too?"

Perry declined to respond directly on Monday, offering only a general statement through a spokesman.

"This is no time to turn from the internationalist traditions of Eisenhower and Reagan," said Perry spokesman Travis Considine. "Taking the wrong path would mean passing along a world even more dangerous and less secure than the one we live in today."

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