Church of England votes in favor of women bishops

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
13 PHOTOS
Church of England
See Gallery
Church of England votes in favor of women bishops
Dean of Women in central London, priest and author, Rosemary Lain-Priestley arrives for the Church of England General Synod in York, northern England, on July 14, 2014. The Church of England was debating whether to allow female bishops for the first time in its history before a vote on July 14, which could end half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO / LINDSEY PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
Female members of the clergy join the queue to enter the Church of England General Synod in York, northern England, on July 14, 2014. The Church of England was debating whether to allow female bishops for the first time in its history before a vote on July 14, which could end half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO / LINDSEY PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
Female members of the clergy join the queue to enter the Church of England General Synod in York, northern England, on July 14, 2014. The Church of England was debating whether to allow female bishops for the first time in its history before a vote on July 14, which could end half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO / LINDSEY PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the clergy arrive for the Church of England General Synod in York, northern England, on July 14, 2014. The Church of England was debating whether to allow female bishops for the first time in its history before a vote on July 14, which could end half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO / LINDSEY PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
Parish vicar Libby Lane (L) and Archdeacon of Norwich Jan McFarlane (R) arrive for the Church of England General Synod in York, northern England, on July 14, 2014. The Church of England was debating whether to allow female bishops for the first time in its history before a vote on July 14, which could end half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO / LINDSEY PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby arrives after lunch break during the Church of England General Synod in York, northern England, on July 14, 2014. The Church of England was debating whether to allow female bishops for the first time in its history before a vote on July 14, which could end half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO / LINDSEY PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby (R) breaks for lunch with his chaplain Jo Wells (L) during the Church of England General Synod in York, northern England, on July 14, 2014. The Church of England was debating whether to allow female bishops for the first time in its history before a vote on July 14, which could end half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO / LINDSEY PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
YORK, ENGLAND - JULY 14: The Archbishop of York John Sentamu leaves the morning session of the annual Church of England General Synod at York University on July 14, 2014 in York, England. Members and officers of the Church of England's General Synod are voting on whether to introduce women bishops. If successful women bishops could be announced and ordained within the next year. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
YORK, ENGLAND - JULY 14: Members of the Church of England's Synod attend the morning session of the annual Church of England General Synod before they vote on the introduction of women Bishops at York University on July 14, 2014 in York, England. Members and officers of the Church of England's General Synod are voting on whether to introduce women bishops. If successful women bishops could be announced and ordained within the next year. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby (2-R) arrives with his Advisor for Evangelism and Witness, Chris Russell (3-R) and his Social and Public Affairs Adviser, Helen Dawes (2-L) for the Church of England General Synod in York on July 14, 2014. The Church of England could vote to allow female bishops for the first time in its history, ending half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO/Lindsey PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
A member of the clergy arrives for the Church of England General Synod in York on July 14, 2014. The Church of England could vote to allow female bishops for the first time in its history, ending half a century of bitter divisions over the role of women. A yes vote by its governing body, the General Synod, could see the first women appointed to the Anglican Church's top jobs by the end of this year. AFP PHOTO/Lindsey PARNABY (Photo credit should read LINDSEY PARNABY/AFP/Getty Images)
YORK, ENGLAND - JULY 14: Members of the Church of England's Synod attend the morning session of the annual Church of England General Synod before they vote on the introduction of women Bishops at York University on July 14, 2014 in York, England. Members and officers of the Church of England's General Synod are voting on whether to introduce women bishops. If successful women bishops could be announced and ordained within the next year. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
YORK, ENGLAND - JULY 14: The Revd Luke Hopkins reads abook as he joins members of the public and female clergy queueing for the afternoon session of the annual Church of England General Synod at York University on July 14, 2014 in York, England. Members and officers of the Church of England's General Synod are voting on whether to introduce women bishops. If successful women bishops could be announced and ordained within the next year. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


LONDON (AP) - The Church of England has voted to allow women to enter its top ranks as bishops.

The Church's national assembly, known as the General Synod, approved the historic measure at its meeting in York in northern England Monday.

A total of 351 members of the Synod's three different houses voted in favor of the measure, while 72 voted against and 10 abstained.

The measure had the support of Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Prime Minister David Cameron.

The vote comes two years after similar legislation failed to reach a two-thirds majority among the General Synod's lay members, despite approval from bishops and clergy.

Earlier Monday, Welby told the BBC that he hoped the vote would go through, saying "the votes, I think, are there."

The Church of England is part of the Anglican Communion, which has the largest Christian denomination in Britain and a presence in more than 160 countries.
Church to Hold Women Bishops Vote
More from AOL.com:
Man diagnosed with 'rarest' form of the plague
'Thousands of rockets remain in Gaza'
Read Full Story

People are Reading