2 police officers tied to KKK in Florida

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Police officers tied to KKK
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2 police officers tied to KKK in Florida
Officer George Hunnewell accused of ties with the KKK (Photo via Facebook)
Deputy Chief David Borst accused of ties with the KKK (Photo via Fruitland Park Police Department)
Officer George Hunnewell accused of ties with the KKK (Photo via Fruitland Park Police Department)
This photo provided by St. Tammany Parish Sheriff's Office shows Raymond Foster, the head of a Ku Klux Klan chapter from Bogalusa, La. Foster was booked into St. Tammany Parish jail in Covington, La., with second-degree murder charges in the death of a woman in rural St. Tammany Parish on Monday after she tried to back out of a KKK initiation ritual. (AP Photo/St. Tammany Parish Sheriff's Office)
In this photo taken March 28, 2012, white supremacist Shaun Winkler, who is running for Bonner County sheriff, is shown in Rathdrum, Idaho. The white power activist is running as a Republican in the May 15 Bonner County primary to become the top law enforcement officer. Winkler said despite the white supremacist beliefs he holds as a KKK imperial wizard, his brand of justice would be color blind. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios)
Reverend David Kennedy, looks at items as John Howard watches him inside The Redneck Shop in Laurens, SC, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008. (AP Photo/Patrick Collard)
A T-shirt with the words "Save Our Land Join The Klan" is displayed inside The Redneck Shop in Laurens, SC, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008. (AP Photo/Patrick Collard)
Faye Landham, left, listens to members of The Traditional Christian Knights of the Ku Klux Klan as Johnathan Schmidt salutes them with his daughter, Eternity, on his shoulders, during a rally Saturday, March 17, 2007, in Stephenville, Texas. (AP Photo/Rex C. Curry)
Hooded members of the World Order of the Ku Klux Klan give a speech at the Gettysburg National Military Park during a protest rally Saturday, Sept. 2, 2006 in Gettysburg, Pa. The KKK fielded 25 members for the event. (AP Photo/Daniel Shanken)
Hooded members of the World Order of the Ku Klux Klan arrive at the Gettysburg National Military Park for a protest rally Saturday, Sept. 2, 2006 in Gettysburg, Pa. The KKK fielded 25 members for the event and their were no incidents. (AP Photo/Bradley C Bower)
A member of the Ku Klux Klan taunts the crowd during a rally on the steps of the Cumberland County Courthouse in downtown Carlisle, Pa., Saturday, Sept. 23, 2000.(AP Photo/Chris Knight)
Norman Siegel, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, listens as he talks to reporters at a Ku Klux Klan rally outside the Criminal Court building in New York, Saturday, Oct. 23, 1999. Siegel fought in the courts to win the Klan permit to rally, but they were denied permission to wear their trademark masks. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
Marleen Wenthe, 9, of Bremen, Germany listens to a Ku Klux Klan counter demonstration outside the Criminal Court building Saturday, Oct. 23, 1999 in New York. A dozen Ku Klux Klan members stood silently -- faces exposed -- holding a Confederate flag as more than 800 demonstrators jeered and protested the Klan's rally today in lower Manhattan. (AP Photo/Suzanne Plunkett)
Members of the Church of the American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan march around the Madison County Courthouse in Canton, Miss., Saturday, May 29, 1999. About 40 members of the group conducted their "informational program" at the courthouse following their brief march. All the activities ended with no incident. (AP Photo/Rogelio Solis)
Norman Siegel, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, listens as he talks to reporters at a Ku Klux Klan rally outside the Criminal Court building in New York, Saturday, Oct. 23, 1999. Siegel fought in the courts to win the Klan permit to rally, but they were denied permission to wear their trademark masks. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
Ambrose Lucke, crew leader at the Missouri Department of Transportation sign shop, applies pre-cut letters to one of the Ku Klux Klan's "Adopt-A-Higway" sign Friday, Feb. 4, 2000, in Jefferson City, Mo. MoDOT agreed to replace the signs, which were stolen less than two days after being installed last November, after the group picked up its safety vests and training video yesterday. The Klan adopted a stretch of Interstate 55 in south St. Louis County. (AP Photo/Kelley McCall)
Suffolk County police officers stand behind some of the items confiscated during a search warrant of the home of Joseph Donato, Jr. Sunday, May 25, 2003, in Hauppauge, N.Y. The Suffolk County District Attorney's Office announced that they had arrested Donato Friday on weapons charges. Police confiscated dozens of weapons, a Ku Klux Klan gown and hood, and other apparel adorned with swastikas and racist emblems. (AP Photo/Ed Betz)
The Adopt-A-Highway sign along Interstate 55 South, in St. Louis, bears the name of the Ku Klux Klan, in this Thursday, Feb. 10, 2000 photo. The sign had been knocked down and the Klan's leader doubts that the signs will last very long. The Ku Klux Klan Adopt-A-Highway signs in St. Louis aren't going back up anytime soon because they pose a potential safety threat, a state highway official said Tuesday< May 23, 2000. The KKK won the right to take part in Missouri's Adopt-A-Highway cleanupprogram aftera federal judge ruled that the Missouri Department of Transportation could not keep the group out of the cleanup program. (AP Photo/James A. Finley)
Hooded members of the World Order of the Ku Klux Klan give a speech at the Gettysburg National Military Park during a protest rally Saturday, Sept. 2, 2006 in Gettysburg, Pa. The KKK fielded 25 members for the event and their were no incidents. (AP Photo/Bradley C Bower)
A Texas State Police officer stands guard during a rally held by The Traditional Christian Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, Saturday, March 17, 2007, in Stephenville, Texas. (AP Photo/Rex C. Curry)
FILE - In a Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008 file photo, Rev. David Kennedy, pastor of New Beginnings Baptist Church, stands outside The Redneck Shop in Laurens, S.C. A judge has ruled that the New Beginnings Baptist Church is the rightful owner of the building where The Redneck Shop is located. New Beginnings sued John Howard and others in 2008, saying the property was transferred to the church in 1997 by a Klansman fighting with others inside the hate group.(AP Photo/Patrick Collard, File)
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FRUITLAND PARK, Fla. (AP) -- Two police officers are no longer with the city department here after a law enforcement report tied them to the Ku Klux Klan, an official said Monday.

Deputy Chief David Borst resigned and Officer George Hunnewell was fired last week, City Manager Gary La Venia said.

The link surfaced in a report from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement based on information from the FBI, which learned about the connection during a broader investigation, La Venia said. He didn't know what it was focused on.

Florida Department of Law Enforcement spokewoman Gretl Plessinger said she couldn't say what was in the report since it is "active intelligence."

An FBI spokesman in Jacksonville didn't immediately respond to a voicemail.

The State Attorney's Office told city officials that pending cases from the officers will be reviewed, although Borst's job was primarily administrative and didn't involve much patrolling, La Venia said.

The city of 5,000 residents is located about 40 miles northwest of Orlando. Fruitland Park was once known for its citrus groves and is in Lake County, where KKK violence in the 1940s and 1950s was chronicled in the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, "Devil in the Grove."

La Venia said residents were surprised. "This city is diverse, tolerant. It's a welcoming community," he said.

A phone number listed for Borst was disconnected. Hunnewell's number was not listed.

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