5 memorable World Cup chants

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5 memorable World Cup chants
Costa Rica soccer fans pose for a selfie before watching their team's World Cup round of 16 match against Greece on a live telecast inside the FIFA Fan Fest area on Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, June 29, 2014. Costa Rica won a penalty shootout 5-3 after the match ended 1-1 following extra time. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JUNE 28: People gather and watch a live broadcast in Copacabana of the 2014 FIFA World cup match between Brazil and Chile on June 28, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Host country Brazil advanced to the quarterfinals. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Costa Rica soccer fans celebrate their team's victory at the World Cup round of 16 match against Greece as they watch the game on a live telecast inside the FIFA Fan Fest area on Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, June 29, 2014. Costa Rica won a penalty shootout 5-3 after the match ended 1-1 following extra time. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Colombia fans cheer before a live broadcast of the World Cup round of 16 soccer match between Colombia and Uruguay at the FIFA Fan Fest, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Brazil soccer fans celebrate after their team scored a penalty shot against Chile as they watch the World Cup round of 16 match on TV outside the Vai Vai Samba school in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 28, 2014. Brazil won 3-2 on penalties. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
Brazil soccer fans dance in the street after their team defeated Chile at a World Cup round of 16 match in the FIFA Fan Fest area of Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 28, 2014. Brazil won the match 3-2 on penalties after the match ended 1-1. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Nikki Madeira cheers as the United States blocks a shot as she watches a World Cup soccer match between the United States and Germany, Thursday, June 26, 2014, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
United States fans react while watching the 2014 World Cup soccer match between the United States and Germany at a public viewing party, Thursday, June 26, 2014, in Philadelphia. Germany defeated the United States 1-0 to win Group G ahead of the Americans, who also advanced to the knockout stage of the World Cup despite losing. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Mexican soccer fan Estela Rodriguez watches the telecast of the 2014 World Cup Brazil between Brazil vs Mexico in Huntington Park, Calif., on Tuesday, June 17, 2014. Brazil failed to beat Mexico for the first time at a World Cup, held to a 0-0 draw in Fortaleza Tuesday in their second game in Group A. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
US fans sit in the stands prior to the group G World Cup soccer match between the USA and Germany at the Arena Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, Thursday, June 26, 2014. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 30: Greek fans react to play in the Greece and Costa Rica World Cup match on June 30, 2014 in Athens ,Greece. Costa Rica will play in its first ever quarterfinal match after defeating Greece in a penalty shootout. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JUNE 29: Fans watch the Round of 16 match between Mexico and the Netherlands at FIFA Fan Fest on June 29, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Amin Mohammad Jamali/Getty Images)
RECIFE, BRAZIL - JUNE 29: A Brazilian supporter smiles during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Round of 16 match between Costa Rica and Greece at Arena Pernambuco on June 29, 2014 in Recife, Brazil. (Photo by Alexander Hassenstein - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JUNE 29: Fans watch the Round of 16 football match between Mexico and the Netherlands at FIFA Fan Fest on June 29, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images)
FORTALEZA, BRAZIL - JUNE 29: A Mexican fan celebrates after Giovani dos Santos of Mexico scores during the Round of 16 match of the 2014 World Cup between Netherlands and Mexico at the Estadio Castelao on June 29, 2014 in Fortaleza, Brazil. (Photo by Ian MacNicol/Getty Images)
FORTALEZA, BRAZIL - JUNE 29: A Mexico fan poses prior to the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Round of 16 match between Netherlands and Mexico at Estadio Castelao on June 29, 2014 in Fortaleza, Brazil. (Photo by Lars Baron - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JUNE 28: Brazilians gather on Copacabana Beach after their shootout win over Chile on June 28, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Host country Brazil advances to the quarter-finals. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JUNE 28: Supporters dressed as Superman and Batman celebrate at the stadium arena during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil round of 16 match between Colombia and Uruguay at Maracana on June 28, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Alexander Hassenstein - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images)
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By Karl Ritter

SAO PAULO (AP) -- With "I believe that we will win!" American soccer fans finally have a World Cup chant that doesn't just involve shouting their country's name.

In terms of creativity, though, it's a notch below Argentina's elaborate sing-alongs or even the boisterous chants of the English.

All players can testify to the goose bump-inducing effect of thousands of fans joining together for a synchronized chant.

While most fans simply spell out the name of their country, from Chile's "Chi-chi-chi Le-le-le" to Germany's "Deutschland, Deutschland," some have developed more creative chants that celebrate their own teams while poking fun at their opponents.

The trick is to be cheeky without being offensive; national team chants are usually less vulgar than those sung by fans of club teams around the world.

Here's a look at five prominent chants from supporters of World Cup teams in Brazil:

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I AM BRAZILIAN

Besides their deafening rendition of the national anthem, Brazilian fans haven't really used their home-ground advantage to out-sing the opposing fans. One exception is when they join together to sing "I am Brazilian, with a lot of pride and a lot of love." The song was written 65 years ago by a Brazilian high school teacher for a match between his students and ones from Germany. But the chant has recently fallen into disgrace by fans who judge its lyrics outdated and lacking the rhythmic verve for which Brazilian music is known. At this World Cup, some determined fans handed out cheat sheets ahead of games containing lyrics to proposed alternatives. So far none have caught on.

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BRAZIL, HOW DOES IT FEEL?

Argentina, Brazil's historical rival, clearly has the upper hand when it comes to vocal support from the fans. The Argentine fans have an impressive repertoire of chants and even came up with a new one specifically tailored for the World Cup in Brazil. To a tune that sounds like Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Bad Moon Rising," the song asks Brazil how it feels "to have daddy in your house." Something's lost in the translation from Spanish, but it implies that Argentina is the greater of the two football powers (despite Brazil's 5-2 edge in World Cup titles). The song recalls Argentine high-points in its rivalry with Brazil, including the goal by Claudio Caniggia that kicked Brazil out of the 1990 World Cup. Like many Argentine chants, it ends with the claim that "Maradona is greater than Pele."

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MEXICO'S GOAL-KICK SLUR

The one-word chant that Mexican fans shout during goal kicks has just one purpose: to taunt the opposing goalkeeper. The two-syllable word literally means male prostitute but has various interpretations in Spanish. After the chant was heard at Mexico's games in Brazil, FIFA opened a disciplinary case against the Mexican federation, which is responsible for the behavior of its fans inside stadiums. However, the world football body didn't take any action saying "it is not considered insulting in this specific context." Annoyed that FIFA even investigated the matter, Mexican fans briefly changed the chant to "Pepsi," the main competitor of a major World Cup sponsor.

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TWO WORLD WARS AND ONE WORLD CUP

Sung to the tune of "Camptown Races," this English chant references England's 20th century victories over Germany, and epitomizes the lager-lout chauvinism and cheeky sense of humor that are hallmarks of the country's chants. It ignores the contributions of England's allies in both world wars and the fact that England hasn't won any major title since the 1966 World Cup, but English fans don't care. Beer cup in hand, they belt out "Two world wars and one World Cup" as if Britannia still ruled the waves, the skies and everything in between. The irony of the song is that the chief reason Germany cannot avenge its defeat in 1966 is that England keeps getting knocked out of World Cups early.

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I BELIEVE THAT WE WILL WIN!

Shouted by fans in various sports in the U.S., this straightforward chant has become the anthem of Americans supporting the U.S. team in Brazil. It's been promoted by ESPN and the American Outlaws supporters group and has been very loud at the World Cup grounds when the U.S. is playing. The message may be a bit plain, but repeated over and over with a steady rhythm, the chant becomes infectious, particularly when accompanied by samba drums. And it's given U.S. fans an alternative to the basic "U-S-A, U-S-A" chant.

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