Bosnian Serbs erect statue to Gavrilo Princip, teen assassin who ignited WWI

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Bosnian Serbs erect statue to Gavrilo Princip, teen assassin who ignited WWI
This undated photo provided by the Historical Archives Sarajevo shows Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip. On June 28, 1914 Gavrilo Princip fired the shots that killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie, during a visit to the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo in 1914. (AP Photo/Historical Archives Sarajevo)
Bosnian actor Jovan Mojsilovic poses with a plastic replica gun during ceremony of unveiling statue of Gavrilo Princip in Istocno Sarajevo, on Friday, June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled a monument of Gavrilo Princip in the Eastern part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
Bosnian people gathered to touch or kiss statue during unveiling ceremony for the statue to Gavrilo Princip in Istocno Sarajevo, on Friday, June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled a monument of Gavrilo Princip in the Eastern part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
Bosnian people gathered to touch or kiss statue during ceremony of unveiling statue of Gavrilo Princip in Istocno Sarajevo, on Friday, June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled a monument of Gavrilo Princip in the Eastern part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
Bosnian folk dancers posing in front of statue during ceremony of unveiling statue of Gavrilo Princip in Istocno Sarajevo, on Friday, June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled a monument of Gavrilo Princip in Eastern part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
A woman places a flower as Bosnian people gather to touch a statue of late Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip, during an unveiling ceremony in Istocno, Sarajevo, on June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled in the Eastern part part of Sarajevo a monument in honour of late Bosnian ethnic Serb Gavrilo Princip, a man who was part of a group of nationalists known as 'Young Bosnia' who ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914. The Sarajevo assasination is regarded by historians as being an immediate trigger for the begining of World War I. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
The Police Arresting Gavrilo Princip, 1894 -1918. Bosnian Serb Who Assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand Of Austria And His Wife, Sophie, Duchess Of Hohenberg, In Sarajevo On 28 June 1914. From The Story Of 25 Eventful Years In Pictures, Published 1935. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, 1914. The Archduke Franz Ferdinand (1863-1914), heir to the Austrian throne, and the Archduchess Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo on 1914 by a Serbian nationalist, Gavrilo Princip. The assassination set Europe firmly on the road to the First World War. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Police in Sarajevo arrest a man after a failed assassination attempt on the life of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, 28th June 1914. The arrested man previously thought to be Gavrilo Princip, who succeeded in killing the Archduke the same day, is now thought to be one of his six co-conspirators Nedeljko Cabrinovic. The assassination was one of the causes of World War I.(Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images)
13th July 1955: The footprints of Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, marking the spot from which he fired the bullets which killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie on 28th June 1914. (Photo by Chris Ware/Keystone Features/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Grave of Gavrilo Princip, Sarajevo cemetery, Bosnia-Hercegovina, Yugoslavia, 1939. Gavrilo Princip (1894-1918), a Yugoslav nationalist, assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914, setting in motion the chain of events tha (Photo by IBL Bildbyra/Heritage Images/Getty Images)
Arrest of Gavrilo Princip, assassin of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, 1914. Princip, a Serbian nationalist murdered the Archduke Franz Ferdinand (1863-1914), heir to the Austrian throne, at Sarajevo, on 28 June 1914. The assassination set Europe firmly on the road to the First World War. (Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI uniform form a line at the historic camp during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: A history enthusiast dressed in WWI uniform stands at the square during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
ITALY - : Sarajevo: Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austrian throne, and his wife. Illustrator Achille Beltrame (1871-1945), from La Domenica del Corriere, 5th July 1914. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
Citizens cross the street in front of the historical landmark, where Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Archduke, Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sofia were assassinated on June 28, 1914. The Sarajevo assassination is reputed to have been an immediate trigger for the begining of World War I. The assassination was carried out by Bosnian ethnic Serb, Gavrilo Princip, member of 'Young Bosnia' organisation. (Wall banner shows portraits of Gavrilo Princip (L) and Archduke Franz Ferdinand (R) AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI Austrian uniform ride horses during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI uniform walk together during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
A pedestrian walks on March 26, 2014, in Belgrade past a vandalized graffiti depicting Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip who shot the Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophia in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. Although the underlying causes of World War I are well known -- simmering tensions between rival blocs, bound by a complex network of alliances -- the assassination in Sarajevo has long been considered as the trigger for the beginning of the 1914-18 conflict. The Cyrillic writing reads as 'Revolt'. AFP PHOTO / ANDREJ ISAKOVIC (Photo credit should read ANDREJ ISAKOVIC/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY RUSMIR SMAJILHODZIC Visitors look at documents on April, 2014 as they at the museum in Sarajevo dedicated to the assassination of Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Arcduke Franz Ferdinand and his pregnant wife Sophia on June 28, 1914, by a member of the organisation 'Black Hand', Gavrilo Princip. Sarajevo is no stranger to conflict, but while the wounds of the Bosnian war's siege are still raw, the city is seeking to cash in on its historical claim as the place where World War I was ignited. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI uniform talk to each other at the historic camp during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: A history enthusiast adjustes his WWI uniform at the historic camp during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI Austrian uniform ride horses during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: An amateur actor playing the part of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria waves at the square during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: A history enthusiast dressed in WWI Austrian uniform rides a horse during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: A history enthusiast dressed in WWI Austria uniform polishes insignia on his cap at the historic camp during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY RUSMIR SMAJILHODZIC Visitors look at documents on April, 2014 as they at the museum in Sarajevo dedicated to the assassination of Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Arcduke Franz Ferdinand and his pregnant wife Sophia on June 28, 1914, by a member of the organisation 'Black Hand', Gavrilo Princip. Sarajevo is no stranger to conflict, but while the wounds of the Bosnian war's siege are still raw, the city is seeking to cash in on its historical claim as the place where World War I was ignited. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY RUSMIR SMAJILHODZIC A photo taken on April 1, 2014 shows the frontpage of 3rd extra issue of the 'Bosniche Post' newspaper bringing headline 'The Assassination' at the museum in Sarajevo dedicated to the assassination of Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Arcduke Franz Ferdinand and his pregnant wife Sophia on June 28, 1914, by a member of th organisation 'Black Hand', Gavrilo Princip. Sarajevo is no stranger to conflict, but while the wounds of the Bosnian war's siege are still raw, the city is seeking to cash in on its historical claim as the place where World War I was ignited. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
VIENNA, AUSTRIA: A photo taken 28 June 2004, 90 years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Serb nationalist student Gavrilo Princip triggered Wold War I, a military history museum in Vienna displays the car in which the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was riding in Sarajevo when he was killed. AFP PHOTO / DIETER NAGL (Photo credit should read DIETER NAGL/AFP/Getty Images)
VIENNA, AUSTRIA: A photo taken 28 June 2004, shows visitors looking at the uniform Archduke Franz Ferdinand wore when he was assassinated by a Serb nationalist student Gavrilo Princip, 90 years after the Archduke's assassination, at a military history museum in Vienna. AFP PHOTO/Dieter Nagl - (Photo credit should read DIETER NAGL/AFP/Getty Images)
SARAJEVO, BOSNIA AND HERCEGOVINA: A citizen of Sarajevo passes 26 June 2004 the site on Sarajevo's Appel Quay where young Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip and fellow members of Mlada Bosna (Young Bosnia), part of Ujedinjenje ili Smrt, the Serbian Black Hand, assassinated the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, Franz Ferdinand, and his wife, Sofia. The gun and grenade attack on Ferdinand on June 28 1914, during a state visit to Sarajevo, capital of the Austrian possession, was blamed by Austria on Serbia on July 28, touching off the sequence of events which led to the outbreak of WWI in August with Germany's moves against Russia and France, fulfilling Count Bismarck's prediction that 'some damn foolish thing in the Balkans' would inevitably inflame the alliances of Hapsburg Europe. June 28, the Orthodox St Vitus Day, is also remembered by Serbs as the anniversary of the Serbian defeat of 1389 in the Battle of Kosovo against the Ottoman Turks. (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 16, 2014 shows the Austria Hotel in Sarajevo where Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophia spent their last night before being assassinated by Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip on June 28, 1914. Although the underlying causes of World War I are well known -- simmering tensions between rival blocs, bound by a complex network of alliances -- the assassination in Sarajevo has long been considered as the trigger for the beginning of the 1914-18 conflict. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 16, 2014 shows the Sarajevo City Hall, the last place that Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophia visited before being assassinated by Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip on June 28, 1914. Although the underlying causes of World War I are well known -- simmering tensions between rival blocs, bound by a complex network of alliances -- the assassination in Sarajevo has long been considered as the trigger for the beginning of the 1914-18 conflict. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Dec. 2, 2013 file photo, hostel manager, Nirela Smajovic, fixes up a room in the Franz Ferdinand hostel in Sarajevo, Bosnia. The hostel aims to liven up the memory of the June 28, 1914 assassination of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne by Bosnian Serb student Gavrilo Princip. A number of events are planned in Sarajevo around the Centenary of the assassination that triggered World War I. (AP Photo/Amel Emric, File)
In this April 2, 2014 photo, a man looks back as he passes by the corner where Gavrilo Princip fired the bullet that killed the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914. The assassination soon set in motion a series of events which would eventually lead to World War I. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
This April 4, 2014 photo shows a reproduction of a London newspaper front page from 1914, which writes about the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, on display at the National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Mo. With the remembrance of the assassination in the Bosnia capital approaching, the old entrenched positions are resurfacing, making it clear old divisions continue to run deep. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's relatives, Nikola Princip, right, and his grandson Novak Princip,16, pay their respects at the Princip family plot in a cemetery in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. A century later, Gavrilo Princip still provokes controversy from beyond the grave as his legacy has been molded time and again to meet political agendas in the Balkans, still a patchwork of ethnic and religious rivalries. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photoa, a Bosnian man walks down an alley in the town that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip, in 1914, ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 4, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's nephew Nikola Princip, 79, right, and his grandson Novak Princip,16, pay their respects in front of the Serbian Orthodox Chapel located in St. Mark Cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip and his co-conspirers where re-buried at the chapel in 1920 under a large grey granite marker on which is engraved "Heroes of St. Vitus Day". (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 4, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's nephew Nikola Princip, 79, left, and his grandson Novak Princip,16, walk out of the Serbian Orthodox Chapel located in St. Mark Cemetery after paying their respects in Sarajevo, Bosnia. The family of Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip, who fired the shots in Sarajevo that triggered a global conflict, honor his memory and refuse to participate in debates about his actions. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Nov. 11, 2013 photo, an expert at the Historical Archives Sarajevo inspects old newspapers and a photo collection surrounding the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo, Bosnia. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
This Feb. 5, 2014 photo shows a view out of the window of the house that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. A century later, Gavrilo Princip still provokes controversy from beyond the grave as his legacy has been molded time and again to meet political agendas in the Balkans, still a patchwork of ethnic and religious rivalries. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's relatives, from left, Nikola Princip, 79, Miljko Princip, 81, Milan Princip ,53, and Novak Princip,16, look at the remains of the house Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip, in 1914, ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photoa, a Bosnian man walks down an alley in the town that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip, in 1914, ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's grandnephew Novak Princip, 16, hides from rain as he plays with a tennis ball and racket inside the doorway of the house Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip, in 1914, ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's relative Milan Princip, 53, points to an shows engraving on a stone wall which contains the initials G.P (Gavrilo Princip) and the year 1909 on the ruins of the house that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's nephew Nikola Princip, 79, left, and his grandson Novak Princip, 16, look at the remains of the house that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. A century later, Gavrilo Princip still provokes controversy from beyond the grave as his legacy has been molded time and again to meet political agendas in the Balkans, still a patchwork of ethnic and religious rivalries. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Nov. 11, 2013 photo, an expert at the Historical Archives Sarajevo inspects old newspapers and a photo collection surrounding the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo, Bosnia. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
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By AIDA CERKEZ

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) -- Marking the eve of the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs on Friday unveiled a monument in their part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.

At the other end of the city, the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra was rehearsing for Saturday's grand EU-sponsored performance, planned as a symbolic start of a new century of peace at the place where the century of wars in Europe started 100 years ago.

The two separate events testify to the depth of lingering divisions in Bosnia-Herzegovina, where one side performed works of Austrian, German and French composers in a salute to European integration while the other celebrated the man who assassinated the emperor's heir as a national hero.

Saturday's concert aims to emphasize the transformation Europe has gone through, said Clemens Hellsberg, the President of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. "We feel obliged to do things in a better way than it was done in the past," the Austrian said, adding the orchestra is delivering a message of humanity to those who want to listen.

It will start with the Bosnian anthem and finish with Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" - the official European anthem - which symbolizes where Europe sees Bosnia's future, he said.

In the Bosnian Serb East Sarajevo they have a different view of Bosnia's future: to divide the country so that the Serb part can join neighboring Serbia.

During the unveiling ceremony Friday, a young actor dressed as shooter Gavrilo Princip ran on the stage and fired two shots in the air. He then cited a poem Princip wrote in captivity which was followed by a Serbian folk dance. Later the actor pointed his gun into the air while posing in front of Princip's statue as people in the crowd shouted he should "shoot at NATO" or "shoot at the EU."

"Gavrilo Princip was a freedom fighter and the Austro Hungarian empire was an occupier here," said the president of the Bosnian Serb half of the country, Milorad Dodik, after he unveiled the 2 meters-high bronze statue.

"People who live here have never been on the same side of history and are still divided. We are sending different messages and that says it all about this country which is being held together by international violence," he said.

A century ago Austria accused Serbia of masterminding the assassination and attacked the country with backing from Germany. Serbia's allies, Russia and France, were quickly drawn in and later Britain, its sprawling Commonwealth empire and the United States also joined the fighting. When the mass slaughter known as the Great War ended in 1918, it had claimed some 14 million lives.

For the Bosnian Serbs Princip's shots on St. Vitus Day - a sacred Serb holiday of June 28 - announced the liberation from Austro-Hungarian rule and a chance for including Bosnia into the neighboring Serbian kingdom. That same idea inspired the Serbs in 1992 to fight the decision by Muslim Bosnians and Catholic Croats to declare the former republic of Bosnia independent when Serb-dominated Yugoslavia fell apart.

A peace agreement ended the 1992-95 war without a winner by recognizing Bosnia as a sovereign state but divided in two parts - one for the Serbs and the other shared by Muslim Bosniaks and Roman Catholic Croats. The Serb leadership sees the current division only as a step toward a final dissolution and inclusion of their half into Serbia.

"St. Vitus day is an inspiration for all of us," said Nebojsa Radmanovic, the Serb member of Bosnia's joint three-member presidency. "It's an inspiration in the fight for our freedom, in a fight for our sacrifice and in our joint battle for a joint country, which we haven't managed yet to create," he said referring to a Greater Serbia.

Serbs refused to take part in the commemoration in Sarajevo on Saturday, where the EU has financed various international cultural events to mark the centennial.

"Sarajevo is now a symbol of a century of wars in Europe but we are here to talk about peace and reconciliation," said Joseph Zimet, Sarajevo director general of the "Mission du centenaire" - a French-led partnership program managing the WWI commemorations. He added that it "was a pity" Serbs from Serbia and Bosnia have "not joined us".

Sarajevo mayor Ivo Komsic said those who refused to come "demonstrated not their attitude toward the past but toward the future of this region."

Maestro Franz Welser-Most said the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra came to Sarajevo "with a historical burden" and with the intention to "send a clear message: Never again!"

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