Injured Giants fan attends trial as it nears end

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Injured Giants fan attends trial as it nears end
@AlSeibPhoto catches Bryan Stow attending final day of testimony in civil case against #Dodgers and Frank McCourt. http://t.co/kZtoEZNoo6
Bryan Stow is taken from an LA hospital to one in San Francisco on May 16, 2011. Stow, a San Francisco Giants fan from Santa Cruz, Calif., was beaten in the Dodgers Stadium parking lot after the opening day game between the Giants and Dodgers.
Defendants Marvin Norwood, left, and Louie Sanchez appear during a hearing Thursday Feb. 20, 2014 in Los Angeles. The two men pleaded guilty Thursday to a 2011 beating at Dodger Stadium that left San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow brain damaged and disabled. They were immediately sentenced by an angry judge who called them cowards and the sort of people that sports fans fear when they go to games.(AP Photo/Nick Ut )
LOS ANGELES, CA, JUNE 08: Louie Sanchez listens during preliminary proceedings in Superior Court June 8, 2012. in Los Angeles, California. Superior Court judge George G. Lomeli has ordered Sanchez and co-defendant Marvin Norwood to stand trial on charges they assaulted San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow at Dodger Stadium in 2011. The decision caps a six-day preliminary hearing that included dramatic testimony from witnesses who recalled Stow being assaulted as well as a recording of Norwood admitting to his mother that he was 'involved' in the opening day beating. (Photo by Irfan Khan-Pool/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA, MAY 31: Defendant Marvin Norwood looks on during his preliminary hearing in Los Angeles Superior court May 31, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Norwood and co-defendant Louie Sanchez are charged in the beating of San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow in the parking lot of Dodger Stadium on opening day 2011. (Photo by Irfan Khan-Pool/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 18: A Los Angeles Police Department cadet hands out flyers with composite drawings of suspects in the beating of Giants fan Bryan Stow to fans before the game between the San Francisco Giants and the Los Angeles Dodgers on May 18, 2011 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 03: Dave Stow, the father of Bryan Stow throws out the first pitch before the game between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the San Francisco Giants at AT&T Park on September 3, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Tony Medina/Getty Images)
Bonnie Stow, sister of beating victim Bryan Stow, wipes her eyes during a hearing Thursday Feb. 20, 2014 in Los Angeles. Two men, Marvin Norwood, and Louie Sanchez pleaded guilty Thursday to a 2011 beating at Dodger Stadium that left San Francisco Giants fan Stow brain damaged and disabled. The pair were immediately sentenced by an angry judge who called them cowards and the sort of people that sports fans fear when they go to games.(AP Photo/Nick Ut )
LOS ANGELES - MAY 18: A Los Angeles Police Department cadet hands out flyers with composite drawings of suspects in the beating of Giants fan Bryan Stow to fans before the game between the San Francisco Giants and the Los Angeles Dodgers on May 18, 2011 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MAY 18: San Francisco General Hospital chief of neurosurgery Dr. Geoff Manley speaks during a news conference regarding the status of severely beaten San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow on May 18, 2011 in San Francisco, California. After being transferred from U.S.C. Medical Center in Southern California, San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow remains in a coma after he was severely beaten following the Los Angeles Dodgers home opener against the Giants in Los Angeles. Stow remains in critical but stable condition and has responded positively to being taken off one of the five seizure drugs that he is on. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 17: One of 300 billboards showing a 'wanted' poster for two suspects wanted for the beating of a San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow is seen during Los Angeles Police Department chief Charlie Beck's news conference on May 17, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. It was announced during the news conference that the Los Angeles Dodgers have raised the reward by an additional $100,000 for a total of $200,000. Stow, a San Francisco Giants fan from Santa Cruz, California, was beaten at the Los Angeles Dodgers parking lot after the opening day game against the San Francisco Giants on March 31. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 17: Los Angeles Police Department police chief Charlie Beck standing in front of one of 300 billboard showing a 'wanted' poster for two suspects wanted for the beating of a San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow shows a Los Angeles Dodgers Andre Ethier #16 jersey which he said the woman driver was wearing during the getaway from Dodger Stadium at a news conference on May 17, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. It was announced during the news conference that the Los Angeles Dodgers have raised the reward by an additional $100,000 for a total of $200,000. Stow, a San Francisco Giants fan from Santa Cruz, California, was beaten at the Los Angeles Dodgers parking lot after the opening day game against the San Francisco Giants on March 31. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 16: Bryan Stow is loaded into an ambulance, as his neurosurgeon Dr. Gabriel Zada (R) and the medical staff watch, so he can be taken from Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to Bob Hope Airport for a trip to San Francisco General Hospital, on May 16, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. Stow, a San Francisco Giants fan from Santa Cruz, California, was beaten at the Los Angeles Dodgers parking lot after the opening day game against the San Francisco Giants almost six weeks ago. (Photo by Al Seib-Pool/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 14: Los Angeles Police Department patrol cars are deployed at Los Angeles Dodger Stadium prior to the start of the baseball game between the St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers on April 14, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. Large number of LAPD officesr were deployed at Dodger Stadium for the first time as part of a zero tolerance policy toward misbehaving fans in response to the opening day attack of San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow two weeks ago. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 14: Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt (C) outlines new security measures at Dodger Stadium as Los Angeles Police Department Chief Charlie Beck (L) and former chief William Bratton listen prior to a game between the St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers on April 14, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. Large numbers of LAPD officers are being deployed as part of a zero tolerance policy toward misbehaving fans in response to the opening day attack on San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow two weeks ago. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
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LOS ANGELES (AP) - A San Francisco Giants fan who suffered brain damage in a beating in a Dodger Stadium parking lot sat front and center Wednesday in a courtroom as testimony wrapped up in a negligence lawsuit against the Dodgers and former owner Frank McCourt.

Plaintiff Bryan Stow was brought to court in a wheelchair as jurors listened to a recorded deposition by a security expert.

However, Stow was quickly hustled into a hallway when defense lawyers showed a video of the two men who went to prison for beating him.

Louie Sanchez and Marvin Norwood, who pleaded guilty in the assault, were seen on camera in Los Angeles County jail invoking their Fifth Amendment right not to testify. They refused even to say their names.

Stow's lawyer, Tom Girardi, said outside court that he did not want to risk upsetting his client with the video of his assailants, even though he said the former paramedic has no memory of the events. He said he has had to explain to Stow why he is sitting in court.

The 45-year-old Stow had made a brief appearance in court during jury selection. On Wednesday, he stayed most of the day. With his hair cropped close to his head, jurors could see deep scars where his skull had been temporarily removed during medical treatment.

Stow suffered severe brain damage in the attack by the two Dodgers fans after the 2011 Opening Day game between the California rivals.

The last defense witness was Ramon Mayterena, a former vice president of Dodgers security, who lives out of state and gave his testimony on videotape. He said he was hired after multiple interviews, including one by Jamie McCourt, then the wife of Frank McCourt.

"Mrs. McCourt expressed concern about fights in the stadium," Mayterena testified.

He said he was hired because the team lacked anyone with background in handling security for such a large venue. A former U.S. Secret Service agent, Mayterena said he had handled security for presidential trips.

On the videotaped cross-examination, he said the Dodgers' bureaucratic hierarchy was in disarray and the people who hired him were soon gone and replaced by people with even less security experience.

There were disputes over whether to place uniformed Los Angeles police officers in the stadium, he said, because "a lot of fans had had run-ins with the police."

Many of those fans had tattoos and appeared to be gang members, he said, adding that the arrival of police in uniform at the scene of any dispute would exacerbate the situation.

Attorneys for Stow claim too many security officers merely wore shirts saying "police," which did not carry the authority necessary to discourage fights and rowdy behavior.

Outside court, Stow chatted amiably with family members. Girardi confirmed that he had recently suffered another of the strokes that have beset him since the attack.

Still, the lawyer said Stow was "coming back to where he was" and added, "it was good to see him smile."

Attorneys were due to deliver final arguments on Thursday. The plaintiffs are seeking about $50 million for Stow's lifetime care.

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