Fancy freebies: Tycoon to treat homeless to lunch

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Fancy freebies: Tycoon to treat homeless to lunch
This picture taken on October 10, 2012 shows Chinese billionaire and philanthropist Chen Guangbiao holding a bicycle as he stands on the roof of the new cars which he bought costing five million yuan (795,000 USD) in Beijing as presents to the 43 owners of Japanese cars that were damaged last month during the nationwide anti-Japan protests that were fueled by Japan's 'purchase' of the Diaoyu Islands, also known as the Senkaku islands in Japan. The dispute over the uninhabited island chain, which has rumbled for decades, flared in August and September with landings by nationalists from both sides and the subsequent nationalisation of the islands by Tokyo. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/GettyImages)
Chinese billionaire Chen Guangbiao opens a news conference by performing his original composition, "My Chinese Dream," in New York, Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014. Chen, a singing business tycoon who bills himself as China’s “No. 1 philanthropist” told reporters in New York on Tuesday that he has brought two women to U.S. to undergo surgery for disfiguring burns they suffered when they set themselves on fire during a protest in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square in 2001. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
NANJING, CHINA - DECEMBER 24: (CHINA OUT) Chinese billionaire and philanthropist Chen Guangbiao, Chairman of Jiangsu Huangpu Recycling Resources Co., Ltd, poses at a temporary television studio decorated with 16 tons of 100-yuan bank notes to promote the upcoming national economic census on December 24, 2013 in Nanjing, China. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
Chinese billionaire Chen Guangbiao, left, , responds to questions at a news conference, in New York, Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014. Chen announced at the news conference that he underwrite corrective surgery for two women who were burned during a 2001 self-immolation in Tiananmen Square. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
BEIJING, CHINA - JANUARY 30: (CHINA OUT) Chen Guangbiao (R), Chairman of Jiangsu Huangpu Recycling Resources Co., Ltd, presents his company's product canned fresh air at Beijing Financial Street on January 30, 2013 in Beijing, China. Chen is known for his high-profile charity activities. Heavy fog has been lingering in central and eastern China since Tuesday afternoon, disturbing the traffic and worsening air pollution. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - JANUARY 30: (CHINA OUT) Chen Guangbiao (C), Chairman of Jiangsu Huangpu Recycling Resources Co., Ltd, presents his company's product canned fresh air at Beijing Financial Street on January 30, 2013 in Beijing, China. Chen is known for his high-profile charity activities. Heavy fog has been lingering in central and eastern China since Tuesday afternoon, disturbing the traffic and worsening air pollution. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
This picture taken on October 10, 2012 shows Chinese billionaire and philanthropist Chen Guangbiao holding a bicycle as he stands on the roof of the new cars which he bought costing five million yuan (795,000 USD) in Beijing as presents to the 43 owners of Japanese cars that were damaged last month during the nationwide anti-Japan protests that were fueled by Japan's 'purchase' of the Diaoyu Islands, also known as the Senkaku islands in Japan. The dispute over the uninhabited island chain, which has rumbled for decades, flared in August and September with landings by nationalists from both sides and the subsequent nationalisation of the islands by Tokyo. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/GettyImages)
China's most famous philanthropist Chen Guangbiao (2nd R) holds up a large cheque as he donates four million Taiwan dollars (137,000 USD) to charity groups during a visit to the Taiwan city of Hsinchu on January 27, 2011. Chen, well-known in China for his flamboyant style of charity, started handing out cash on the first day of a controversial trip to Taiwan that has sparked criticism and protests from anti-China groups. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK LIN (Photo credit should read PATRICK LIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Two people count banknotes in traditional 'red envelops' at a charity event where Chinese philanthropist Chen Guangbiao donated money to charity groups during a visit to the Taiwan city of Hsinchu on January 27, 2011. Chen, well-known in China for his flamboyant style of charity, started handing out cash on the first day of a controversial trip to Taiwan that has sparked criticism and protests from anti-China groups. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK LIN (Photo credit should read PATRICK LIN/AFP/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - JANUARY 30: (CHINA OUT) Chen Guangbiao (L), Chairman of Jiangsu Huangpu Recycling Resources Co., Ltd, presents his company's product canned fresh air at Beijing Financial Street on January 30, 2013 in Beijing, China. Chen is known for his high-profile charity activities. Heavy fog has been lingering in central and eastern China since Tuesday afternoon, disturbing the traffic and worsening air pollution. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
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NEW YORK (AP) - A Chinese tycoon is set to feed hundreds of homeless New Yorkers some fancy food - in Central Park.

The Wednesday lunch for 250 residents of a Manhattan shelter will be served at the Boathouse restaurant.

Recycling magnate Chen Guangbiao has selected a menu of sesame-seed-encrusted tuna, beef filet and berries with crème fraiche. He also plans to regale his guests by singing "We are the World." And he has promised each guest $300.

Chen says he wants to disprove the cliche image of rich Chinese spending money mostly on luxuries.

"I was not born into a rich family or a family of government officials. When I was 4 years old my brother and sister died of hunger, so I achieved my success through confidence, self-motivation and my hard work," Chen said in Chinese in an interview on "CBS This Morning."

He then launched into an a cappella rendition of "We are the World."

Chen is partnering on the event with the New York City Rescue Mission, the oldest shelter in the nation.

"Our thought was if someone wants to treat them to an amazing event - something they would never experience on their own, maybe even a kernel of hope that life could be different again, we're in for that reason. That's our motive," said the mission's executive director, Craig Mayes.

But Chen's American ambitions surpass philanthropy.

Earlier this year, the 46-year-old businessman wanted to buy The New York Times. Times chairman Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., said the newspaper was not for sale.

To announce the lunch, Chen placed ads in the Times and The Wall Street Journal.

Chinese Billionaire Offers To Help America's Poor

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