Sisters discover lamp worth $125,000 on 'Antiques Roadshow'

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'Antiques Roadshow': Two Sisters Emotional Over Value Of Mother's Lamp

On "Antiques Roadshow," two took a stroll down memory lane when two sisters brought in their mother's lamp that was purchased in the1960s for $125. And while they had a feeling the lamp could be worth a lot, they had no idea just how much.

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Antique lamp worth $125,000
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"This lamp is worth between $80,000 and $125,000 dollars," the appraiser announced. "Congratulations!" The sisters both broke into tears and hugged -- they were shocked.

We figured it would be worth a lot of money considering it was worth around $200 back in 1905, which was a lot of money back then.

We then got an update that the lamp is now worth between $250,000 and $300,000 dollars! The gorgeous glass lamp was made at a studio that was operated by the son of the founder of Tiffany and Company. The lamp dates from 1905 and has the "rose helmet" shade design. The arc and leaf base gives it an art nouveau style. The appraiser points out that this particular lamp has a very unusual design, which is part of the reason for its high value today.

While original Tiffany lamps cost more than a mortgage, beautiful replicas can be purchased for under $200 on Amazon.com. You can also find similar Tiffany style lamps on Overstock.com in the same price range.

Check out "Antique's Roadshow" behind-the-scenes:

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A look inside 'Antiques Roadshow'
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Sisters discover lamp worth $125,000 on 'Antiques Roadshow'
This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows Ted Trotta, of Trotta-Bono, Ltd., right, looking at Lisa as she reacts about information about her Spontoon Tomahawk Pipe during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season.(AP Photo/PBS)
Appraisers Fred Oster, left, from Philadelphia, and David Bonsey, of Boston, review a 1920 French violin at the "Antiques Roadshow" event in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2005. They found it to be a replica of a circa 1516 German violin. The Antiques Roadshow television series is a result of a summer tour of the United States where experts appraise the treasures people bring for evaluation. (AP Photo/Kim D. Johnson)
This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows a man named Joe holding a Max Brother prop duck during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season. (AP Photo/PBS)
Marcelyn, left, and daughter, Stephanie, right, of Monte Sereno, Calif., react to the news when announced that their "Norton Sound Alaska hunting helmet" is appraised to be worth between $65,000 and $75,000, during taping for the PBS-TV show called, "Chubb's Antiques Roadshow - Discovering America's Hidden Treasures," in San Francisco, Saturday, Aug. 9, 1997. The mask, made circa 1800, was picked up by mother and daughter at a flea market. (AP Photo/Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Darryl Bush)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 21, As people enter the convention center they have a brief interview by volunteers who give them tickets depending up the items they are bringtin for appraisal on August 21, 2010. These tickets will get them to the correct appraiser. (Photo by Tracy A Woodward/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Marcelyn, left, and daughter, Stephanie, right, of Monte Sereno, Calif., react to the news when announced that their "Norton Sound Alaska hunting helmet" is appraised to be worth between $65,000 and $75,000, during taping for the PBS-TV show called, "Chubb's Antiques Roadshow - Discovering America's Hidden Treasures," in San Francisco, Saturday, Aug. 9, 1997. The mask, made circa 1800, was picked up by mother and daughter at a flea market. (AP Photo/Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Darryl Bush)
Butterfield and Butterfield Auction House appraiser Greg Martin holds a 16th century Milanese Cabasett valued at approximately $250,000 during the taping of the Chubb Antique Roadshow at the Civic Center in Philadelphia, Saturday, June 15, 1996, in this handout photo. The owner is a Philadelphia woman who allowed herself to be taped for the show, which will air on public television in 1997, but would not identify herself after the appraisal. (AP Photo/Chubb Antique Road Show/Tim Shaffer)
Lark E. Mason Jr., an appraiser at Sotheby's in New York, estimates a 1920's Edward Farmer Jade and 18K gold jewelry box at $125,000. This box was among thousands of items brought to the Rhode Island Convention Center in Providence, R.I., during the final stop of the season for the PBS television program, Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Saturday, Aug. 21, 1999. (AP Photo/Susan E. Bouchard)
Folk art and collectables are brought in for appraisals for the PBS series 'Antique Roadshow' at the Myrtle Beach Convention Center in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Saturday, June 23, 2012. John Lytle Wilson, left, shows off a painting of a pair of twins from his family dating back to 1850 as Stan South, right, waits for an appraisal of his flax comb dated 1775. Some of the appraisals were filmed, and will air between January and March of 2013. (Janet Blackmon Morgan/Myrtle Beach Sun-News/MCT via Getty Images)
390703 04: Tara Finley, left, an appraiser on Chubb''s Antiques Roadshow television show tells Sue Dale that her penny arcade machine from the 1920''s is worth $700, June 16, 2001 during filming in Miami. The popular show attracted more than 6,000 people who brought in antiques and collectibles to be appraised. (Photo by Tim Chapman/Getty Images)
390703 02: Jim Duncan, right, holds up a collection of old Creek Chub Tarpon Pikies fishing lures June 16, 2001 while he waits in line to get into Chubb''s Antiques Roadshow television show at the Coconut Grove Convention Center in Miami. Some of Duncan''s lures were appraised at thousands of dollars. Over 6,000 people from across south Florida arrived hoping to get appraisals of theirs antiques to see if they had any unexpected valuables. (Photo by Tim Chapman/Getty Images)
This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows a man named Joe holding a Max Brother prop duck during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season. (AP Photo/PBS)
This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows Ted Trotta, of Trotta-Bono, Ltd., right, looking at Lisa as she reacts about information about her Spontoon Tomahawk Pipe during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season.(AP Photo/PBS)
In this Saturday, July 23, 2011 photo, Asian art expert and veteran "Antiques Roadshow." appraiser Lark Mason poses with a collection of Chinese rhinoceros horned cups in Tulsa, Okla. PBS says the collection was judged by Mason to be worth $1 million to $1.5 million, the most valuable item brought in for appraisal in the history of "Antiques Roadshow," which will air its 16th season next year. (AP Photo/WGBH)
A fry glass teapot is one of the many treasures brought to the "Antiques Roadshow" event in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2005. The Antiques Roadshow television series is a result of a summer tour of the United States where experts appraise the prized items people bring for evaluation. (AP Photo/Kim D. Johnson)
Carol Stratton, left, and Tim Bolle' use strollers to transport their treasures including a Chinese jardiniere and a child's rocking chair at the "Antiques Roadshow" event in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2005. The Antiques Roadshow television series is a result of a summer tour of the United States where experts appraise the treasures people bring for evaluation. (AP Photo/Kim D. Johnson)
Marcelyn, left, and daughter, Stephanie, right, of Monte Sereno, Calif., react to the news when announced that their "Norton Sound Alaska hunting helmet" is appraised to be worth between $65,000 and $75,000, during taping for the PBS-TV show called, "Chubb's Antiques Roadshow - Discovering America's Hidden Treasures," in San Francisco, Saturday, Aug. 9, 1997. The mask, made circa 1800, was picked up by mother and daughter at a flea market. (AP Photo/Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Darryl Bush)
Thousands of people wait in line to have their treasured possessions appraised by a team of experts during the final stop of the popular PBS television program, Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Saturday, Aug. 21, 1999, at the Rhode Island Convention Center in Providence, R.I. (AP Photo/Susan E. Bouchard)
Lark E. Mason Jr., an appraiser at Sotheby's in New York, estimates a 1920's Edward Farmer Jade and 18K gold jewelry box at $125,000. This box was among thousands of items brought to the Rhode Island Convention Center in Providence, R.I., during the final stop of the season for the PBS television program, Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Saturday, Aug. 21, 1999. (AP Photo/Susan E. Bouchard)
Chubb's Antique Roadshow appraiser Colleena Fesko, center right, talks with an Albuquerque resident about her late 18th century paintings at the Roadshow's stop in Albuquerque, N.M., Saturday July 20, 2002. The show rolled into Albuquerque on Saturday as part of a nationwide tour. (AP Photo/Randy Siner)
Butterfield and Butterfield Auction House appraiser Greg Martin holds a 16th century Milanese Cabasett valued at approximately $250,000 during the taping of the Chubb Antique Roadshow at the Civic Center in Philadelphia, Saturday, June 15, 1996, in this handout photo. The owner is a Philadelphia woman who allowed herself to be taped for the show, which will air on public television in 1997, but would not identify herself after the appraisal. (AP Photo/Chubb Antique Road Show/Tim Shaffer)
In this Saturday, July 23, 2011 photo, Asian art expert and veteran "Antiques Roadshow." appraiser Lark Mason poses with a collection of Chinese rhinoceros horned cups in Tulsa, Okla. PBS says the collection was judged by Mason to be worth $1 million to $1.5 million, the most valuable item brought in for appraisal in the history of "Antiques Roadshow," which will air its 16th season next year. (AP Photo/WGBH)
A fry glass teapot is one of the many treasures brought to the "Antiques Roadshow" event in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2005. The Antiques Roadshow television series is a result of a summer tour of the United States where experts appraise the prized items people bring for evaluation. (AP Photo/Kim D. Johnson)
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