6-fingered Silva family roots for Brazil's 6th World Cup title

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6-fingered Silva family roots for Brazil's 6th World Cup title
Members of the Silva family, back row, from left, Silvia Santos, Joao de Assis, Pedro de Assis, Ana Carolina Santos and Silvana Santos, front row, Bernardo de Assis, left, and Maria Morena Santos, pose for a photo in their home to show that they each have six fingers on each of their hands, in Brasilia, Brazil, Thursday, June 19, 2014. The family was born with an extra digit on each hand as a result of a genetic condition known as polydactyly. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Silvia Santos, facing camera, embraces her daughter Ana Carolina at their home in Brasilia, Brazil, Thursday, June 19, 2014. All the members of the Silva family were born with an extra digit on each hand as a result of a genetic condition known as polydactyly. Rather than recoil in the face of constant stares by curious onlookers the 14 members of the family spanning four generations seem to embrace their physical differences with pride. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Silvia Santos, facing camera, embraces her daughter Ana Carolina at their home in Brasilia, Brazil, Thursday, June 19, 2014. All the members of the Silva family were born with an extra digit on each hand as a result of a genetic condition known as polydactyly. Rather than recoil in the face of constant stares by curious onlookers the 14 members of the family spanning four generations seem to embrace their physical differences with pride. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
A general view shows the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro prior to a Group B football match between Spain and Chile during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on June 18, 2014. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Brazil's Neymar runs with the ball during the group A World Cup soccer match between Brazil and Mexico at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, Tuesday, June 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
Brazil's Neymar, right, gets past Mexico's Francisco Rodriguez during the group A World Cup soccer match between Brazil and Mexico at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, Tuesday, June 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
TERESOPOLIS, BRAZIL - JUNE 19: Neymar in action during a training session of the Brazilian national football team at the squad's Granja Comary training complex, on June 19, 2014 in Teresopolis, 90 km from downtown Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)
(top L-R) Brazil's defender David Luiz, Brazil's goalkeeper Julio Cesar, Brazil's defender Thiago Silva, Brazil's forward Fred, Brazil's midfielder Luis Gustavo and (bottom L) Brazil's midfielder Oscar, Brazil's defender Dani Alves, Brazil's forward Neymar, Brazil's midfielder Ramires, Brazil's midfielder Paulinho, Brazil's defender Marcelo line up a Group A football match between Brazil and Mexico in the Castelao Stadium in Fortaleza during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on June 17, 2014. AFP PHOTO / VANDERLEI ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read VANDERLEI ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
FORTALEZA, BRAZIL - JUNE 17: Neymar of Brazilgets up after falling to the ground during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group A match between Brazil and Mexico at Estadio Castelao on June 17, 2014 in Fortaleza, Brazil. (Photo by Lars Baron - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images)
FORTALEZA, BRAZIL - JUNE 17: Neymar (R) of Brazil clashes with Mexico's Fabian (front) at World Cup match between Brazil and Mexico in the Estádio Castelão World Cup stadium in Fortaleza, northeast Brazil, June 17, 2014. (Photo by Levi Bianco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
FORTALEZA, BRAZIL - JUNE 17: (CHINA OUT, SOUTH KOREA OUT) Neymar of Brazil is brought down during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group A match between Brazil and Mexico at Castelao on June 17, 2014 in Fortaleza, Brazil. (Photo by The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)
Brazil's Neymar controls a ball during the group A World Cup soccer match between Brazil and Mexico at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, Tuesday, June 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
Croatia's Ivan Perisic, left, challenges Brazil's Hulk for the ball during the group A World Cup soccer match between Brazil and Croatia, the opening game of the tournament, in the Itaquerao Stadium in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, June 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Brazil's Neymar, right, celebrates with teammate Hulk after scoring during the group A World Cup soccer match against Croatia in the opening game of the tournament at Itaquerao Stadium in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, June 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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By TAIS VILELA

AGUAS CLARAS, Brazil (AP) -- A family is counting on the fingers of a single hand its hopes for Brazil to win a sixth World Cup championship.

All the members of the Silva family living in Aguas Claras, a town on the outskirts of the capital of Brasilia, were born with an extra digit on each hand as a result of a genetic condition known as polydactyly.

Rather than recoil in the face of stares by curious onlookers, the 14 members of the family spanning four generations seem to embrace their physical difference with pride.

And that pride never shines more brightly than during the World Cup as they relish the attention of Brazilian media, which have trained cameras on the family as much of the South America nation crosses its fingers hoping the national team will add to its record five World Cup titles.

"Since the last World Cup we wanted Brazil to become hexacampeao," said Ana Carolina Santos da Silva, using the Portuguese term for "six-time champion" that would be the envy of the soccer world. "But it didn't happen, so this year we really want Brazil to achieve the sixth."

Far from a hindrance, having an extra finger seems to help the Silva family perform domestic chores and pursue musical talents.

Fourteen-year-old Joao de Assis da Silva shows off his dexterity moving up and down his guitar's fret board.

His 8-year-old cousin, Maria Morena da Silva, has dreams of making music too. "I have never played the piano, but I want to learn, and it might be easier playing with six fingers," she says.

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