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Woman struck by lightning in bed

Woman In Bed Gets Struck By Lightning

When there's thunder and lightning outside, childhood instinct says to hide under the covers.

Check out these crazy lightning snapshots:


Unfortunately, a woman in Michigan found out this week that you may not be safe from a lightning strike ... even in your own bed.

Bethany Houghton was trying to sleep early Wednesday morning when she saw a blinding flash and felt a sharp pain. She told WOOD about the experience.

"I just felt this pain and this loud boom that woke me up and this light. It was just like a shock and a tingling sensation and then my arm too."

She immediately called 911, but when paramedics showed up, the tingling sensation was going away and her vital signs were good, so she didn't go to the hospital.

Firefighters believe the lightning struck Houghton's house and traveled into her room through a nearby breaker box before hitting her. As WKZO reports, Houghton was not seriously hurt, but she suffered a spider web shaped mark on her knee and a burn on her thumb.

People can and do get struck by lightning while they are indoors.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says, "If a bolt strikes your house or a nearby power line, it can travel into your house through the plumbing or the electric wiring! If you are using any electrical appliances ... and a storm is overhead, you are putting yourself at risk!"

Here's another 'shocking' fact: The NOAA reports that about 4-5% of people struck by lightning were talking on a corded phone when it happened.

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