Sarajevo: the slaying that set off World War I

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Sarajevo: the slaying that set off World War I
This undated photo provided by the Historical Archives Sarajevo shows Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip. On June 28, 1914 Gavrilo Princip fired the shots that killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie, during a visit to the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo in 1914. (AP Photo/Historical Archives Sarajevo)
Bosnian actor Jovan Mojsilovic poses with a plastic replica gun during ceremony of unveiling statue of Gavrilo Princip in Istocno Sarajevo, on Friday, June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled a monument of Gavrilo Princip in the Eastern part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
Bosnian people gathered to touch or kiss statue during unveiling ceremony for the statue to Gavrilo Princip in Istocno Sarajevo, on Friday, June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled a monument of Gavrilo Princip in the Eastern part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
Bosnian people gathered to touch or kiss statue during ceremony of unveiling statue of Gavrilo Princip in Istocno Sarajevo, on Friday, June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled a monument of Gavrilo Princip in the Eastern part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
Bosnian folk dancers posing in front of statue during ceremony of unveiling statue of Gavrilo Princip in Istocno Sarajevo, on Friday, June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled a monument of Gavrilo Princip in Eastern part of Sarajevo to the man who ignited the war by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914.(AP Photo/Amel Emric)
A woman places a flower as Bosnian people gather to touch a statue of late Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip, during an unveiling ceremony in Istocno, Sarajevo, on June 27, 2014. Marking the centennial of the beginning of World War I in their own way, Bosnian Serbs have unveiled in the Eastern part part of Sarajevo a monument in honour of late Bosnian ethnic Serb Gavrilo Princip, a man who was part of a group of nationalists known as 'Young Bosnia' who ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian crown prince on June 28, 1914. The Sarajevo assasination is regarded by historians as being an immediate trigger for the begining of World War I. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
The Police Arresting Gavrilo Princip, 1894 -1918. Bosnian Serb Who Assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand Of Austria And His Wife, Sophie, Duchess Of Hohenberg, In Sarajevo On 28 June 1914. From The Story Of 25 Eventful Years In Pictures, Published 1935. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, 1914. The Archduke Franz Ferdinand (1863-1914), heir to the Austrian throne, and the Archduchess Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo on 1914 by a Serbian nationalist, Gavrilo Princip. The assassination set Europe firmly on the road to the First World War. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Police in Sarajevo arrest a man after a failed assassination attempt on the life of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, 28th June 1914. The arrested man previously thought to be Gavrilo Princip, who succeeded in killing the Archduke the same day, is now thought to be one of his six co-conspirators Nedeljko Cabrinovic. The assassination was one of the causes of World War I.(Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images)
13th July 1955: The footprints of Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, marking the spot from which he fired the bullets which killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie on 28th June 1914. (Photo by Chris Ware/Keystone Features/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Grave of Gavrilo Princip, Sarajevo cemetery, Bosnia-Hercegovina, Yugoslavia, 1939. Gavrilo Princip (1894-1918), a Yugoslav nationalist, assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914, setting in motion the chain of events tha (Photo by IBL Bildbyra/Heritage Images/Getty Images)
Arrest of Gavrilo Princip, assassin of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, 1914. Princip, a Serbian nationalist murdered the Archduke Franz Ferdinand (1863-1914), heir to the Austrian throne, at Sarajevo, on 28 June 1914. The assassination set Europe firmly on the road to the First World War. (Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI uniform form a line at the historic camp during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: A history enthusiast dressed in WWI uniform stands at the square during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
ITALY - : Sarajevo: Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austrian throne, and his wife. Illustrator Achille Beltrame (1871-1945), from La Domenica del Corriere, 5th July 1914. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
Citizens cross the street in front of the historical landmark, where Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Archduke, Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sofia were assassinated on June 28, 1914. The Sarajevo assassination is reputed to have been an immediate trigger for the begining of World War I. The assassination was carried out by Bosnian ethnic Serb, Gavrilo Princip, member of 'Young Bosnia' organisation. (Wall banner shows portraits of Gavrilo Princip (L) and Archduke Franz Ferdinand (R) AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI Austrian uniform ride horses during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI uniform walk together during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
A pedestrian walks on March 26, 2014, in Belgrade past a vandalized graffiti depicting Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip who shot the Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophia in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. Although the underlying causes of World War I are well known -- simmering tensions between rival blocs, bound by a complex network of alliances -- the assassination in Sarajevo has long been considered as the trigger for the beginning of the 1914-18 conflict. The Cyrillic writing reads as 'Revolt'. AFP PHOTO / ANDREJ ISAKOVIC (Photo credit should read ANDREJ ISAKOVIC/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY RUSMIR SMAJILHODZIC Visitors look at documents on April, 2014 as they at the museum in Sarajevo dedicated to the assassination of Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Arcduke Franz Ferdinand and his pregnant wife Sophia on June 28, 1914, by a member of the organisation 'Black Hand', Gavrilo Princip. Sarajevo is no stranger to conflict, but while the wounds of the Bosnian war's siege are still raw, the city is seeking to cash in on its historical claim as the place where World War I was ignited. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI uniform talk to each other at the historic camp during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: A history enthusiast adjustes his WWI uniform at the historic camp during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: History enthusiasts dressed in WWI Austrian uniform ride horses during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: An amateur actor playing the part of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria waves at the square during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: A history enthusiast dressed in WWI Austrian uniform rides a horse during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
BENESOV, CZECH REPUBLIC - MAY 31: A history enthusiast dressed in WWI Austria uniform polishes insignia on his cap at the historic camp during the re-enactment of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on May 31, 2014 in Benesov, Czech Republic. About 200 WWI military enthusiasts from across Europe have gathered to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in Sarajevo. This incident, committed by Serbian anarchist Gavrilo Princip, led to events that triggered start of the First World War. Benesov is located near by Konopiste castle, which was main residence of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY RUSMIR SMAJILHODZIC Visitors look at documents on April, 2014 as they at the museum in Sarajevo dedicated to the assassination of Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Arcduke Franz Ferdinand and his pregnant wife Sophia on June 28, 1914, by a member of the organisation 'Black Hand', Gavrilo Princip. Sarajevo is no stranger to conflict, but while the wounds of the Bosnian war's siege are still raw, the city is seeking to cash in on its historical claim as the place where World War I was ignited. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY RUSMIR SMAJILHODZIC A photo taken on April 1, 2014 shows the frontpage of 3rd extra issue of the 'Bosniche Post' newspaper bringing headline 'The Assassination' at the museum in Sarajevo dedicated to the assassination of Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Arcduke Franz Ferdinand and his pregnant wife Sophia on June 28, 1914, by a member of th organisation 'Black Hand', Gavrilo Princip. Sarajevo is no stranger to conflict, but while the wounds of the Bosnian war's siege are still raw, the city is seeking to cash in on its historical claim as the place where World War I was ignited. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
VIENNA, AUSTRIA: A photo taken 28 June 2004, 90 years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Serb nationalist student Gavrilo Princip triggered Wold War I, a military history museum in Vienna displays the car in which the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was riding in Sarajevo when he was killed. AFP PHOTO / DIETER NAGL (Photo credit should read DIETER NAGL/AFP/Getty Images)
VIENNA, AUSTRIA: A photo taken 28 June 2004, shows visitors looking at the uniform Archduke Franz Ferdinand wore when he was assassinated by a Serb nationalist student Gavrilo Princip, 90 years after the Archduke's assassination, at a military history museum in Vienna. AFP PHOTO/Dieter Nagl - (Photo credit should read DIETER NAGL/AFP/Getty Images)
SARAJEVO, BOSNIA AND HERCEGOVINA: A citizen of Sarajevo passes 26 June 2004 the site on Sarajevo's Appel Quay where young Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip and fellow members of Mlada Bosna (Young Bosnia), part of Ujedinjenje ili Smrt, the Serbian Black Hand, assassinated the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, Franz Ferdinand, and his wife, Sofia. The gun and grenade attack on Ferdinand on June 28 1914, during a state visit to Sarajevo, capital of the Austrian possession, was blamed by Austria on Serbia on July 28, touching off the sequence of events which led to the outbreak of WWI in August with Germany's moves against Russia and France, fulfilling Count Bismarck's prediction that 'some damn foolish thing in the Balkans' would inevitably inflame the alliances of Hapsburg Europe. June 28, the Orthodox St Vitus Day, is also remembered by Serbs as the anniversary of the Serbian defeat of 1389 in the Battle of Kosovo against the Ottoman Turks. (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 16, 2014 shows the Austria Hotel in Sarajevo where Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophia spent their last night before being assassinated by Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip on June 28, 1914. Although the underlying causes of World War I are well known -- simmering tensions between rival blocs, bound by a complex network of alliances -- the assassination in Sarajevo has long been considered as the trigger for the beginning of the 1914-18 conflict. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 16, 2014 shows the Sarajevo City Hall, the last place that Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophia visited before being assassinated by Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip on June 28, 1914. Although the underlying causes of World War I are well known -- simmering tensions between rival blocs, bound by a complex network of alliances -- the assassination in Sarajevo has long been considered as the trigger for the beginning of the 1914-18 conflict. AFP PHOTO / ELVIS BARUKCIC (Photo credit should read ELVIS BARUKCIC/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Dec. 2, 2013 file photo, hostel manager, Nirela Smajovic, fixes up a room in the Franz Ferdinand hostel in Sarajevo, Bosnia. The hostel aims to liven up the memory of the June 28, 1914 assassination of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne by Bosnian Serb student Gavrilo Princip. A number of events are planned in Sarajevo around the Centenary of the assassination that triggered World War I. (AP Photo/Amel Emric, File)
In this April 2, 2014 photo, a man looks back as he passes by the corner where Gavrilo Princip fired the bullet that killed the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914. The assassination soon set in motion a series of events which would eventually lead to World War I. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
This April 4, 2014 photo shows a reproduction of a London newspaper front page from 1914, which writes about the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, on display at the National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Mo. With the remembrance of the assassination in the Bosnia capital approaching, the old entrenched positions are resurfacing, making it clear old divisions continue to run deep. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's relatives, Nikola Princip, right, and his grandson Novak Princip,16, pay their respects at the Princip family plot in a cemetery in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. A century later, Gavrilo Princip still provokes controversy from beyond the grave as his legacy has been molded time and again to meet political agendas in the Balkans, still a patchwork of ethnic and religious rivalries. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photoa, a Bosnian man walks down an alley in the town that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip, in 1914, ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 4, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's nephew Nikola Princip, 79, right, and his grandson Novak Princip,16, pay their respects in front of the Serbian Orthodox Chapel located in St. Mark Cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip and his co-conspirers where re-buried at the chapel in 1920 under a large grey granite marker on which is engraved "Heroes of St. Vitus Day". (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 4, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's nephew Nikola Princip, 79, left, and his grandson Novak Princip,16, walk out of the Serbian Orthodox Chapel located in St. Mark Cemetery after paying their respects in Sarajevo, Bosnia. The family of Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip, who fired the shots in Sarajevo that triggered a global conflict, honor his memory and refuse to participate in debates about his actions. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Nov. 11, 2013 photo, an expert at the Historical Archives Sarajevo inspects old newspapers and a photo collection surrounding the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo, Bosnia. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
This Feb. 5, 2014 photo shows a view out of the window of the house that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. A century later, Gavrilo Princip still provokes controversy from beyond the grave as his legacy has been molded time and again to meet political agendas in the Balkans, still a patchwork of ethnic and religious rivalries. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's relatives, from left, Nikola Princip, 79, Miljko Princip, 81, Milan Princip ,53, and Novak Princip,16, look at the remains of the house Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip, in 1914, ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photoa, a Bosnian man walks down an alley in the town that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip, in 1914, ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's grandnephew Novak Princip, 16, hides from rain as he plays with a tennis ball and racket inside the doorway of the house Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. Gavrilo Princip, in 1914, ignited World War I by assassinating the Austro-Hungarian Empire's crown prince Franz Ferdinand on June 28. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's relative Milan Princip, 53, points to an shows engraving on a stone wall which contains the initials G.P (Gavrilo Princip) and the year 1909 on the ruins of the house that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Gavrilo Princip's nephew Nikola Princip, 79, left, and his grandson Novak Princip, 16, look at the remains of the house that Gavrilo Princip was born in the village of Obljaj, near Bosansko Grahovo, 300 kilometers west of Sarajevo, Bosnia. A century later, Gavrilo Princip still provokes controversy from beyond the grave as his legacy has been molded time and again to meet political agendas in the Balkans, still a patchwork of ethnic and religious rivalries. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
In this Nov. 11, 2013 photo, an expert at the Historical Archives Sarajevo inspects old newspapers and a photo collection surrounding the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo, Bosnia. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
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BY AIDA CERKEZ

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) -- A century after Gavrilo Princip ignited World War I with a shot from his handgun, the baby-faced Serb teenager who assassinated the Austro-Hungarian crown prince in Sarajevo in 1914 still provokes controversy.

His legacy has been molded time and again to meet political agendas in the Balkans, which remains a smoldering patchwork of ethnic and religious rivalries.

Nikola Princip crossed himself and stood silently recently in front of a Sarajevo chapel plaque that read "The Heroes of St. Vitus Day." The list starts with Gavrilo Princip's name for the assassination he carried out on that sacred Serb holiday of June 28.

"He lived and died for his ideas to liberate and unite the southern Slavs. May he rest in peace," the 81-year-old man said, lighting a candle.

A few blocks away, another plaque marks the spot where Princip killed Crown Prince Franz Ferdinand. There, Halida Basic, a 72 year-old Bosnian Muslim, has a different view.

"He was a killer, a terrorist. He did it because he wanted Bosnia to be part of Greater Serbia," she said.

Barely a month after the 19-year-old fired his shots, Europe, and eventually the world, was at war.

Austria accused Serbia of masterminding the assassination. Backed by Germany, Austria attacked Serbia, whose allies, Russia and France, were quickly drawn in. Britain, its sprawling Commonwealth empire and the United States also joined the fighting.

When the mass slaughter known as the Great War ended in 1918, it had claimed some 14 million lives - 5 million civilians and 9 million soldiers, sailors and airmen - and left another 7 million troops permanently disabled.

For his part, Princip was immediately arrested and died in captivity months before the war ended.

With the centenary remembrance of the assassination approaching in the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, the old entrenched positions are resurfacing.

"Gavrilo Princip will, just like the past 100 years, remain a hero for some and a terrorist to others," said the head of the Sarajevo History Institute, Husnija Kamberovic. "It is a matter of feelings toward what he did, and not a matter of serious historical arguments."

The split follows Bosnia's ethnic divisions.

Christian Orthodox Serbs celebrate Princip as someone who saw Bosnia as part of the Serb national territory. The same idea inspired the Serbs in 1992 to fight the decision by Muslim Bosnians and Catholic Croats to declare the former republic of Bosnia independent when Serb-dominated Yugoslavia fell apart.

In Serb history books, the "great liberation act" of Princip and his comrades is described for over 20 pages.

"They were heroes who were ready to sacrifice their own lives for freedom and liberation," said Jovan Medosevic, a primary school history teacher in the Bosnian Serb town of Pale, near Sarajevo.

That's exactly what makes Princip unpopular among Muslim Bosnians and Catholic Croats. In their official textbooks, Princip is mentioned in just one sentence as a member of a secret terrorist organization who "did not assassinate Franz Ferdinand to liberate Bosnia from the occupier, but wanted Bosnia to become a part of Kingdom of Serbia," high school student Ermin Lazovic said.

A century ago, Muslim Bosnians and Catholic Croats preferred to stay in the big Austrian empire that had brought progress, law and order. Serbia was already in the process of destroying all mosques on its territory after it had liberated itself from the Ottoman Empire.

Accordingly, authorities in the Serb part of Bosnia plan to erect a monument to Princip and refuse to take part in the planned commemorations in Muslim Bosnian-dominated Sarajevo.

For the Serbs, it is beyond doubt that Austria and Germany were the instigators of World War I, not Princip or the Serbs.

The Sarajevo commemoration includes a performance of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra and an international historical conference at which no Serb academics will attend.

"We have no new facts and we can only reinterpret old documents," Bosnian Serb historian Draga Mastilovic said. "So are we now supposed to accept the Austro-Hungarian position that Serbia caused that war?"

He said he understood why Germans and Austrians want to promote their version of events. "It is not easy to carry the burden of having caused two world-wide bloodbaths in the 20th century," he said.

For Kamberovic, the professor organizing the conference in Sarajevo, everything is open for academic review.

"People who accuse us of trying to revise history before the conference has even started are aware that we do intend to open discussions they do not really like," he said.

"We will talk about how much the expansionist policy of the German monarchy has contributed - but also how much the expansionist policy of Serbia toward Bosnia has contributed to the outbreak of that war," he said.

A Bosnian rock group has even written a song about the sunny morning in 1914 when, according to their lyrics, Princip became a "hero to some, a criminal to others, while probably his own soul is still wandering, somewhere in between."

Fixing the flower arrangement he laid in front of the little chapel in Sarajevo, Nikola Princip admitted he had a personal stake in the debate.

"Gavrilo Princip was my uncle," he said.

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