Rescuers: German researcher out of cave

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Rescuers: German researcher out of cave
Mountain rescuers carry cave researcher Johann Westhauser , center, out of the Riesending cave near Marktschellenberg, southern Germany, Thursday June 19, 2014. The German cave researcher has been successfully brought to the surface after suffering head injuries in an accident deep underground nearly two weeks ago. Westhauser was injured June 8 while nearly 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) underground in the Riesending cave system in the Alps near the Austrian border. (AP Photo/dpa,Nicolas Armer)
Mountain rescuers carry cave researcher Johann Westhauser , center, out of the Riesending cave near Marktschellenberg, southern Germany, Thursday June 19, 2014. The German cave researcher has been successfully brought to the surface after suffering head injuries in an accident deep underground nearly two weeks ago. Westhauser was injured June 8 while nearly 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) underground in the Riesending cave system in the Alps near the Austrian border. (AP Photo/dpa,Nicolas Armer)
The camp of the mountain rescue service next to the entrance of the Riesending cave near Marktschellenberg, southern Germany, photographed early Thursday June 19., 2014. Germany's mountain rescue service said after a short pause overnight, its team resumed work early Thursday morning to bring Johann Westhauser the final 180 meters (590 feet) to the surface. The going has been slow as rescuers have had to haul Westhauser by hand through the narrow winding passage. Westhauser was injured June 8 while nearly 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) underground in the Riesending cave system in the Alps near the Austrian border. (AP Photo/dpa,Nicolas Armer)
Members of the mountain rescue service stand next to the entrance of the Riesending cave near Marktschellenberg, southern Germany, early Thursday June 19., 2014. Germany's mountain rescue service said after a short pause overnight, its team resumed work early Thursday morning to bring Johann Westhauser the final 180 meters (590 feet) to the surface. The going has been slow as rescuers have had to haul Westhauser by hand through the narrow winding passage. Westhauser was injured June 8 while nearly 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) underground in the Riesending cave system in the Alps near the Austrian border. (AP Photo/dpa,Nicolas Armer)
A police helicopter flies above rescuers at the Untersberg mountain near Marktschellenberg, Germany, Wednesday June 18, 2014. Germany's mountain rescue service says it could complete the rescue of an injured cave researcher from the country's deepest cave on Thursday or Friday as experts make good progress through the labyrinth's passages and shafts. Johann Westhauser suffered head injuries June 8 while nearly 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) underground in the Riesending cave system in the Alps near the Austrian border. (AP Photo/dpa,Nicolas Armer)
Rescuers work at the Untersberg mountain near Marktschellenberg, Germany, Wednesday June 18, 2014. Germany's mountain rescue service says it could complete the rescue of an injured cave researcher from the country's deepest cave on Thursday or Friday as experts make good progress through the labyrinth's passages and shafts. Johann Westhauser suffered head injuries June 8 while nearly 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) underground in the Riesending cave system in the Alps near the Austrian border. (AP Photo/dpa,Nicolas Armer)
A police helicopter flies aboce rescuers at the Untersberg mountain near Marktschellenberg, Germany, Wednesday June 18, 2014. Germany's mountain rescue service says it could complete the rescue of an injured cave researcher from the country's deepest cave on Thursday or Friday as experts make good progress through the labyrinth's passages and shafts. Johann Westhauser suffered head injuries June 8 while nearly 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) underground in the Riesending cave system in the Alps near the Austrian border. (AP Photo/dpa,Nicolas Armer)
Un grupo de rescatistas dialogan junto a una tienda de campaña cerca de la entrada del sistema de cuevas Riesending en la montaña Unterberg cercana a Marktschellenberg, Alemania, el miércoles 11 de junio de 2014, donde un renombrado explorador alemán se encuentra atrapado y herido en el interior de una cueva. Los rescatistas iniciaron el viernes 13 de junio el complicado proceso de sacar a la superficie a Johann Westhauser, de 52 años. (Foto AP/dpa, Tobias Hase)
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After nearly two weeks underground in Germany's deepest cave, injured researcher Johann Westhauser has been rescued and brought to the surface, German media have reported.

Rescuers brought cave researcher Johann Westhauser to the surface on Thursday at 11:44 a.m. local time (9:44 UTC).

A medical station had been set up at the mouth of the cave so Westhauser could receive immediate medical attention.

After a short pause overnight, the team resumed work early on Thursday morning to bring Westhauser, who was strapped to a stretcher, the final 180 meters (590 feet) to the surface. The progress was slow going, however, because the team had to haul him by hand through the narrow winding passage.

Westhauser suffered head injuries in a rockslide on June 8 while nearly 1,000 meters underground in the Riesending cave system in the Alps near the Austrian border. He had been with two companions when the rockslide struck, however they escaped without significant injury.

Riesending, which literally translates as "massive thing," was discovered in 1995 during surveying work and is Germany's deepest and largest cave system. It boasts a 19.2-kilometer-long network of paths extending 1,148 meters below ground.

Since the accident, rescuers and doctors from Germany, Switzerland, Austria and Italy have helped in the complicated rescue.

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