US military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,185

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US military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,185
An Army carry team, carries the transfer case containing the remains of Army Spc. Justin R. Helton of Beaver, Ohio, upon arrival at Dover Air Force Base, Del. on Thursday, June 12, 2014. The Department of Defense announced the death of Helton who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
An Army carry team, carries the transfer case containing the remains of Army Cpl. Justin R. Clouse of Sprague, Wash., as United States Army Under Secretary Brad R. Carson, left, and Army Vice Chief of Staff John F. Campbell salute, upon arrival at Dover Air Force Base, Del. on Thursday, June 12, 2014. The Department of Defense announced the death of Clouse who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
An Army carry team move from the transfer vehicle containing the remains of Army Cpl. Justin R. Clouse of Sprague, Wash., Army Spc. Justin R. Helton of Beaver, Ohio and Army Pvt. Aaron S. Toppen of Mokena, Ill., upon arrival at Dover Air Force Base, Del. on Thursday, June 12, 2014. The Department of Defense announced the deaths of Clouse, Helton and Toppen who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
FILE - In this May 28, 2014, file photo, Gen. Joseph Dunford, points during a news conference at the ISAF Headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan. The top U.S. military commander in Afghanistan said the U.S. has increased its surveillance over the Afghan-Pakistani border, as Pakistan pounds a militant stronghold with airstrikes. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini, File)
White House principal deputy press secretary Josh Earnest speaks to the media during the daily news briefing at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Earnest answered questions including on the recent soldier deaths in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
FILE - This May 27, 2014, file photo shows President Barack Obama, standing in the White House Rose Garden, and speaking about the future of US troops in Afghanistan. Obama outlined a timetable for the gradual withdrawal of the last U.S. troops in Afghanistan, and confidently declared, "This is how wars end in the 21st century." But less than three weeks later, there is a sudden burst of uncertainty surrounding the way Obama has moved to bring the two conflicts he inherited to a close. In Iraq, a fast-moving Islamic insurgency is pressing toward Baghdad, raising the possibility of fresh American military action more than two years after the last U.S. troops withdrew. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, left, shakes hands with Sgt. Jose Navarro during Hagel's visit to Bagram Airfield in Bagram, Afghanistan, Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hagel was meeting Sunday with American military commanders in Afghanistan to discuss progress Afghan forces are making as the U.S. looks to pull all but about 10,000 troops out of the country by the end of the year. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Pool)
U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, left, shakes hands with retired Sgt. Brendan Marrocco, from New York City, during Hagel's visit to Bagram Airfield in Bagram, Afghanistan, Sunday, June 1, 2014. Hagel was meeting Sunday with American military commanders in Afghanistan to discuss progress Afghan forces are making as the U.S. looks to pull all but about 10,000 troops out of the country by the end of the year. Sgt. Marrocco was visiting the base to discuss his experience and injuries while deployed. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Pool)
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By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

As of Tuesday, June 17, 2014, at least 2,185 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.

The AP count is eight less than the Defense Department's tally, last updated Tuesday at 10 a.m. EDT.

At least 1,813 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers.

Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 133 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 11 were the result of hostile action.

The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is five more than the department's tally.

The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 19,798 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department.

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The latest identifications reported by the military:

-Spc. Terry J. Hurne, 34, of Merced, California, died June 9, in Logar province, Afghanistan, from a noncombat-related incident; assigned to the 710th Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, New York.

-Five soldiers died June 9, in Gaza Village, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered while engaged in a combat operation; killed were: Staff Sgt. Scott R. Studenmund, 24, of Pasadena, California, and Staff Sgt. Jason A. McDonald, 28, of Butler, Georgia; both assigned to the 1st Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Spc. Justin R. Helton, 25, of Beaver, Ohio; assigned to the 18th Ordnance Company, 192nd Ordnance Battalion, 52nd Ordnance Group, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Cpl. Justin R. Clouse, 22, of Sprague, Washington, and Pvt. Aaron S. Toppen, 19, of Mokena, Illinois, both assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colorado.

-Pfc. Matthew H. Walker, 20, of Hillsboro, Missouri, died June 5, in Paktika province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when his unit was attacked by enemy fire; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

-Capt. Jason B. Jones, 29, of Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania, died June 2, in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, of wounds received from small-arms; assigned 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

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