National Zoo closing invertebrate hall due to cost

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National Zoo closing invertebrate hall due to cost
This image provided by the Smithsonian National Zoo shows Kamala as she arrives at the Smithsonian National Zoo on Friday, May 23, 2014, in Washington. The National Zoo is welcoming three new Asian elephants to its herd as the female elephants arrived Friday at the zoo after a three-day, 2,500 mile trip from the Calgary Zoo in specially-made, 10,000-pound crates. (AP Photo/Smithsonian National Zoo, Janice Sveda)
This photo provided by the Smithsonian National Zoo shows Giant panda cub Bao Bao outside with her mom Mei Xiang for the first time April 1, 2014, at the zoo in Washington. The zoo says Bao Bao tried out her climbing skills on one of the smaller trees and sat on the grass with a piece of bamboo. (AP Photo/Smithsonian National Zoo)
This handout photo provided the Smithsonian's National Zoo, taken May 23, 2011, shows Sumatran tiger Damai at the zoo in Washington. The Smithsonian's National Zoo wants to highlight the dwindling number of 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild by launching an "endangered song" on Earth Day. On Tuesday, the zoo is releasing "Sumatran Tiger," a song from the indie rock band Portugal. The Man. The song was recorded on 400 polycarbonate records that were designed to degrade after a certain number of plays. The only way to save the song is to digitize and "breed" the music by sharing it through social media. It's is being released to 400 participants to share. (AP Photo/Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
This handout photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, taken Jan. 6, 2014, shows keepers bottle-feeding the saved sloth bear cub at the zoo in Washington. Animal keepers at the National Zoo have saved a sloth bear cub after two others were eaten by the mother. The three cubs were born in December to a mother named Khali. One was eaten within 20 minutes, and a second cub was eaten after seven days. The zoo says it's not uncommon for carnivores to eat their young if they're compromised somehow. (AP Photo/Mindy Babitz, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
This handout photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, taken Jan. 8, 2014, shows a sloth bear Khali's newborn cub being cared for at the veterinary hospital at the zoo in Washington. Animal keepers at the National Zoo have saved a sloth bear cub after two others were eaten by the mother. The three cubs were born in December to a mother named Khali. One was eaten within 20 minutes, and a second cub was eaten after seven days. The zoo says it's not uncommon for carnivores to eat their young if they're compromised somehow. (AP Photo/Smithsonian's National Zoo)
Bao Bao, the four and a half month old giant panda cub, trains with an animal keeper at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014. Bao Bao, who now weighs 17.38 pounds (7.9 pounds), was born to the zoo's female giant panda Mei Xiang and male giant panda Tian Tian. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
FILE - In this Jan 7, 2014 file photo, Bao Bao, a giant panda cub, is approached by her mother Mei Xiang in their indoor habitat at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington. The zoo said Monday, March 31, that Bao Bao will have access to her mother yard this week for the first time. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
In this Nov. 29, 2013 photo provided by the Smithsonian National Zoo, a giant panda cub is measured as it is about to turn 100 days old, at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington. The National Zoo announced Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013 that it is naming its giant panda cub Bao Bao after receiving more than 123,000 votes from the public. The zoo asked the public to vote for one of five names. The others were Ling Hua, Long Yun, Mulan and Zhen Bao. The panda cub was born Aug. 23. She is only the second surviving panda cub born in Washington. (AP Photo/Smithsonian National Zoo, Abby Wood)
Two Sumatran tiger cubs, a male, Bandar and a female, Sukacita, play on a set of stairs as they make their public debut at the National Zoo in Washington, Monday Nov. 18, 2013. The two cubs were born in August and are now on public view. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Damai, a Sumatran tiger, plays with one of her two cubs as the cubs make their public debut at the National Zoo in Washington, Monday Nov. 18, 2013. The cubs, who were born in August, are now on public view. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A Grevy's zebra walks in his enclosure at the National Zoo in Washington on Monday Nov. 18, 2013. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
One of two Sumatran tiger cubs peeks out from a set of stairs during the cubs' public debut at the National Zoo in Washington, Monday Nov. 18, 2013. The cubs, who were born in August, are now on public view. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A Grevy's zebra grazes at the National Zoo in Washington on Monday Nov. 18, 2013. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
AP10ThingsToSee - A three-month-old Sumatran tiger cub named "Bandar" reacts after being dunked in the tiger exhibit moat for a swimming test at the National Zoo in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013. All cubs born at the zoo must take a swim test before being allowed to roam in the exhibit. Bandar passed his test. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
A three-month-old Sumatran tiger cub named "Sukacita" is toweled off after passing her swim reliability test in the moat at the tiger exhibit at the National Zoo in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013. All cubs born at the zoo must take a swim test before being allowed to roam in the exhibit.(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
In this photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, a member of the panda team at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo performs the first neonatal exam Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013, on a giant panda cub born Friday, Aug. 23, in Washington. The cub appeared to be in excellent health, zookeepers reported after a 10-minute physical exam Sunday morning. (AP Photo/ Smithsonian's National Zoo, Courtney Janney)
In this photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, a member of the panda team at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo performs the first neonatal exam Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013, on a giant panda cub born Friday, Aug. 23, in Washington. The cub appeared to be in excellent health, zookeepers reported after a 10-minute physical exam Sunday morning. (AP Photo/ Smithsonian's National Zoo, Courtney Janney)
Asian elephant Bozie, 38, originally from Sri Lanka, makes her debut at the Elephant Community Center at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, Thursday, June 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Young girls watch Asian elephant Bozie, 38, originally from Sri Lanka, makes her debut at the Elephant Community Center at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, Thursday, June 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Asian elephant Bozie, 38, originally from Sri Lanka, makes her debut at the Elephant Community Center at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, Thursday, June 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Asian elephant Bozie, 38, originally from Sri Lanka, as she makes her debut at the Elephant Community Center of the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, Thursday, June 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
This undated handout photo provided by the National Zoo shows a red panda that escaped from its enclosure at the zoo in Washington in June 2013 and was later found in a nearby neighborhood. The National Zoo has been inspecting vegetation around all of its exhibits to ensure animal enclosures are secure. According to a zoo report on the escape that The Associated Press obtained following a public records request, the zoo has been investigating and observing the red panda named Rusty ever since he was found in a nearby neighborhood. (AP Photo/Smithsonian’s National Zoo, Abby Wood)
Asian elephant Shanthi plays in an enclosure at the Elephant Community Center during the unveiling of the major expansion of Smithsonian’s National Zoo’s elephant house in Washington, Thursday, March 21, 2013. The Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington is opening an expansive new community center for elephants and hopes to begin expanding its herd. The public opening of "Elephant Trails" on Saturday marks a major expansion for the Asian elephant exhibit. The $56 million overhaul was completed over the past seven years. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2012 file photo, Mei Xiang, a giant female panda, rests at the National Zoo in Washington. A Chinese scientist said that humans used to eat pandas. In a newspaper interview, Wei Guangbiao said prehistoric man ate the bears in what is now part of the city of Chongqing in southwest China. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
The National Zoo's giant panda Tian Tian eats a frozen fruit treat at zoo in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. The zoo announced Thursday that the recent death of Tian Tian and Mei Xiang's cub was due to liver and lung damage. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
FILE - In this July 28, 2012 file photo, two three-month-old cheetah cubs get some shade from the heat while on public view at the National Zoo, in Washington. The zoo on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012 said the cubs have been named Carmelita and Justin after Olympians Carmelita Jeter and Justin Gatlin, who had the best American finishes in the 100-meter dash. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
One of two, three-month-old cheetah cubs, rests in the shade while on public view at the National Zoo, in Washington, on Saturday, July 28, 2012. The cubs are trying out their first week on limited view to the public. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
One of two, three-month-old cheetah cubs, walks through their enclosure on public view at the National Zoo, in Washington, on Saturday, July 28, 2012. The cubs are trying out their first week on limited view to the public. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Two three-month-old cheetah cubs play over a container of water, while on public view at the National Zoo, in Washington, on Saturday, July 28, 2012. The cubs are trying out their first week on limited view to the public. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
In this photo taken Thursday, July 19, 2012, Matt Evans, supervisory biologist at the National Zoo's Reptile Discovery Center, holds a 13-day-old Cuban crocodile hatchling in Washington. Two crocodiles hatched from surprise eggs laid by a 50-something-year-old Cuban crocodile at the National Zoo. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
In this photo taken Thursday, July 19, 2012, Matt Evans, supervisory biologist at the National Zoo's Reptile Discovery Center, holds a 13-day-old Cuban crocodile hatchling in Washington. Two crocodiles hatched from surprise eggs laid by a 50-something-year-old Cuban crocodile at the National Zoo. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
In this photo taken Thursday, July 19, 2012, Barbara Watkins, an animal keeper in the Reptile Discovery Center of the National Zoo, holds a five-day-old Cuban crocodile hatchling in Washington. Two hatchlings were born from surprise eggs laid by a 50-something-year old Cuban crocodile at the National Zoo. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
In this photo taken Thursday, July 19, 2012, Matt Evans, supervisory biologist at the National Zoo's Reptile Discovery Center, holds a 13-day-old Cuban crocodile hatchling in Washington. Two crocodiles hatched from surprise eggs laid by a 50-something-year-old Cuban crocodile at the National Zoo. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
In this Thursday, July 19, 2012, a male Cuban crocodile surfaces inside the Reptile Discovery Center of the National Zoo in Washington. Two hatchlings were born recently from surprise eggs laid by a female 50-something Cuban crocodile at the Zoo. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Cheetah keeper Gil Myers holds a one-month-old female cheetah cub, at the National Zoo in Washington, Wednesday, May 23, 2012, that was delivered via a rare caesarian section. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A one-month-old female cheetah cub has her face cleaned by cheetah keeper Gil Myers at the National Zoo in Washington, Wednesday, May 23, 2012, after being fed milk from a bottle. Two cheetah cubs have been transported to the Smithsonian's National Zoo to be raised by hand after a risky birth three weeks ago at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in northern Virginia. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A one-month-old female cheetah cub, left, that was delivered via a rare cesarean section, is sniffed by her brother, who was delivered normally, Wednesday, May 23, 2012, at the National Zoo in Washington. The cubs are expected to go on public view at the end of the summer. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
An undated photo provided by the Nashville Zoo shows two pair of clouded leopard cubs, a male and female born on February 13 and another male and female born on March 11. In the coming weeks, a female clouded leopard cub born March 8 at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. will arrive to join Nashville’s four. The Zoo plans to place all five on public exhibit this summer. (AP Photo/Nashville Zoo)
In this photo provided by Smithsonian’s National Zoo shows a rare Guam rail chick that hatched at the National Zoo in Washington. National Zoo officials say two rare Guam rail chicks have hatched there. The small, flightless birds hatched March 3 and 4. The total population of the birds is now 162. In several weeks, zookeepers will perform routine medical exams and take feather samples to determine the birds' sexes. (AP Photo/Smithsonian’s National Zoo)
Mei Xiang, the female giant panda at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, eats breakfast Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. The zoo announced a $4.5 million gift Monday to fund its giant panda reproduction program for five more years. Donator and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, who is also co-founder and managing director of the Carlyle Group, said in a news conference, "There are probably 10 million species on the face of the earth, and I doubt that any one of those species is more popular and more beloved than the giant panda." "Hopefully this will result in more pandas being born here," he said. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Mei Xiang, the female giant panda at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, eats breakfast Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. The zoo announced a $4.5 million gift Monday to fund its giant panda reproduction program for five more years. Donator and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, who is also co-founder and managing director of the Carlyle Group, said in a news conference, "There are probably 10 million species on the face of the earth, and I doubt that any one of those species is more popular and more beloved than the giant panda." "Hopefully this will result in more pandas being born here," he said. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Three black footed ferrets huddle in a temporary housing unit as animal keepers at the National Zoo’s conservation center in Front Royal, Va., rounded-up 26 ferrets for shipment to Fort Collins Colo., Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. This shipment Wednesday marks an important moment in the recovery of a species once declared extinct. Researchers rediscovered the black-footed ferret in 1981 and collected the last 24 in Wyoming to try to save them. Now 1,000 are again living in the wild. Black-footed ferrets are the only ferret native to North America. At least a half million used to live on the Great Plains. Prairie dogs are their main food source. But development, disease and extermination of prairie dogs starved the ferrets.(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
Animal keepers at the National Zoo’s conservation center round-up 26 black foot ferrets for shipment to Fort Collins Co, in Front Royal, Va., Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. This shipment Wednesday marks an important moment in the recovery of a species once declared extinct. Researchers rediscovered the black-footed ferret in 1981 and collected the last 24 in Wyoming to try to save them. Now 1,000 are again living in the wild. Black-footed ferrets are the only ferret native to North America. At least a half million used to live on the Great Plains. Prairie dogs are their main food source. But development, disease and extermination of prairie dogs starved the ferrets.(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
Sophie the Sea Lion, left, who was officially named by Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett in honor of former Pittsburgh Mayor Sophie Masloff at the Pittsburgh Zoo & Aquarium in Pittsburgh Monday, Aug. 8, 2011. Sophie will be moving with her mother Callie to the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, D.C. next spring. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
Animal keeper Juan Rodriguez feeds giant panda Mei Xiang apples and pears as an ultrasound is performed on her at the National Zoo in Washington, Thursday, March 24, 2011. "She's looking great," says supervisory veterinarian Jessica Siegal-Willott, "it's too early to say if she's pregnant or pseudo-pregnant but she's progressing normally for both." Mei Xiang was artificially inseminated in January, and is now having weekly ultrasounds to monitor her condition. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Male Giant Panda Tian Tian eats an fruitsicle at the National Zoo in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011. On Thursday, Zoo Director Dennis Kelly and the Secretary General of the China Wildlife Conservation Association Zang Chunlin signed a new Giant Panda cooperative research and breeding agreement for five more years. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Some of the seven lion cubs born at the National Zoo peek behind their mother while making their public debut at the zoo in Washington, on Saturday, Dec. 18, 2010. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
An eight-week-old female lion cub swims through fall leaves during a swim test at the National Zoo in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010. The test was to make sure the four cubs will be safe around the water feature when they are put on public display, which is expected to take place in late December. The test was very successful according to the lion keepers. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Three of the seven lion cubs born at the National Zoo play in the snow while making their public debut at the zoo in Washington, on Saturday, Dec. 18, 2010. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
An eight-week-old male lion cub reacts as he is put in the water for a swim test at the National Zoo in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010. The test was to make sure the four cubs will be safe around the water feature when they are put on public display, which is expected to take place in late December. The test was very successful according to the lion keepers. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Lion keeper Leigh Pitsko removes a dripping eight-week-old female lion cub from the lion exhibit after she passed a swim test at the National Zoo in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010. The test was to make sure the four cubs will be safe around the water feature when they are put on public display, which is expected to take place in late December. Lion keepers say that the test was very successful. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
An Asian elephant sprays water as it cools off at the National Zoo in Washington, Tuesday, July 6, 2010. The East Coast broiled under an unforgiving sun Tuesday as the temperature soared above 100 degrees in several cities, utility companies cranked out power to cool the sweating masses and the unlucky sought any oasis they could find. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
An April 15, 2010 photo provided by the Smithsonian Institution shows a female scimitar-horned oryx calf, left, with it's mother at the National Zoo's zoo's Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal in Virginia. The calf was born April 9, 2010, the zoo announced Wednesday, May 5, 2010, and is the zoo's first such birth in 13 years. Oryx are extinct in the wild. (AP Photo/The National Zoo, Mehgan Murphy)
An April 30, 2010 photo provided by the Smithsonian Institution shows two male clouded leopard cubs that were born Feb. 14, 2010 at the National Zoo's zoo's Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal in Virginia. On Wednesday, May 5, 2010, zoo officials said the cubs have been growing steadily and now weigh more than four pounds. They weighed just a half pound at birth. Clouded leopards are considered "vulnerable to extinction." (AP Photo/The National Zoo, Mehgan Murphy)
Mei Xiang, mother of 4-year-old panda Tai Shan, rolls herself down a snowy hill on Tai Shan's last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonian's panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A White's Tree Frog perches on the hand of biologist Matt Evans, at the National Zoo in Washington, on Monday, May 11, 2009. This frog's skin produces a peptide that can help deter HIV. Frog species are in danger from the spread of a chytrid fungus that is killing amphibians at an alarming rate. The Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, announced Monday May 11, 2009, hopes to stop the spread of the fungus and includes eight zoos and research institutions including the Smithsonian Institution. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A Panamanian Golden Frog is seen at the National Zoo in Washington, on Monday, May 11, 2009. This frog species is in danger from the spread of a chytrid fungus that is killing amphibians at an alarming rate. The Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, announced Monday May 11, 2009, hopes to stop the spread of the fungus and includes eight zoos and research institutions including the Smithsonian Institution. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
This photo provided by the National Zoo, taken March 24, 2009, shows seven-week old leopard cubs at the National Zoo’s Conservation & Research Center (CRC) in Front Royal, Va. (AP Photo/Mehgan Murphy/Smithsonian’s National Zoo)
Dyeing Poison Dart Frogs are seen at the National Zoo in Washington, on Monday, May 11, 2009. Scientists say frog species are in danger from the spread of a chytrid fungus that is killing amphibians at an alarming rate. The Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, announced Monday May 11, 2009, hopes to stop the spread of the fungus and includes eight zoos and research institutions including the Smithsonian Institution. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
A Panamanian Golden Frog appears to wink at the National Zoo in Washington, on Monday, May 11, 2009. This frog species is in danger from the spread of a chytrid fungus that is killing amphibians at an alarming rate. The Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, announced Monday May 11, 2009, hopes to stop the spread of the fungus and includes eight zoos and research institutions including the Smithsonian Institution. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
This handout photo provided by the National Zoo shows three-year-old giant panda Tai Shan snacking on bamboo in his exhibit at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat, Friday, Nov. 7, 2008. (AP Photo/National Zoo, Mehgan Murphy)
This undated photo provided Wednesday, April 29, 2009 by the Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C. shows Happy the hippo. The National Zoo's solitary male Nile hippopotamus is heading to the Milwaukee County Zoo, where his new home will include a pool, a sandy beach and two potential girlfriends, Puddles and Patty. (AP Photo/National Zoo, Mehgan Murphy)
This photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo shows Golden lion tamarin twins, born July 17, clinging to their father’s back as they perch on trees in their exhibit at the zoo in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2008. More than 178 golden lion tamarins have been born at the zoo, the last of which arrived in May of 2007. Golden lion tamarins are usually born in sets of twins, and all members of the family group contribute to caring for and carrying the babies. Golden lion tamarins inhabit the Atlantic coastal forest of Brazil. (AP Photo/Jessie Cohen, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
This undated photo provided Wednesday, April 29, 2009 by the Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C. shows Happy the hippo. The National Zoo's solitary male Nile hippopotamus is heading to the Milwaukee County Zoo, where his new home will include a pool, a sandy beach and two potential girlfriends, Puddles and Patty. (AP Photo/National Zoo, Mehgan Murphy)
Naba, a four-year-old female African lion, keeps cool as she licks a "bloodsicle" made of frozen cow blood, Monday, June 9, 2008, at the National Zoo in Washington, as temperatures rose toward the triple digits along the East Coast. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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WASHINGTON (AP) - The National Zoo is closing its Invertebrate Exhibit, citing rising costs and $5 million in needed upgrades.

The Invertebrate Exhibit's operating cost was about $1 million. It opened originally in 1987. Currently, it houses cuttlefish, corals, crabs, clams and butterflies, among other creatures. The animals will be sent to new homes.

The zoo announced Monday that the exhibit will close permanently Sunday. It is not included in the zoo's five-year strategic plan or its 20-year master plan. Plans call for a future Hall of Biodiversity, including invertebrates.

Zoo Director Dennis Kelly says the closure is necessary for the zoo's financial and operational health. He says the zoo faces rising costs and must adapt its programs to live within its budget.

Invertebrates make up about 99 percent of all known species.
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