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Squatters' massive tent village near World Cup stadium may have worked

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Peoples' Cup
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Squatters' massive tent village near World Cup stadium may have worked
A bird's eye view of the new tent village within view of Itaquerao stadium, the venue that will host the upcoming World Cup opener, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Tuesday, May 6, 2014. The squatters are braving insects, little food and privacy as they hold on to a piece of land in a 37-acre field nestled in the green hills of eastern Sao Paulo. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
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Near 5,0000 families, up from hundreds seemingly overnight, have pitched tents and lean-tos near World Cup stadium, according to a CNN original report.

The squatters, who say they were priced out of the rental market in Sao Paulo, Brazil -- and that their rents nearly doubled when the stadium was built -- were hoping to use the high-traction sporting event to pressure the government to pay attention to needs of low-income families, specifically by providing low-income housing.

According to AP, the families have been 'braving insects, little food and a lack of privacy,' though it looks like it may have been worth it, according to CNN:

All the pressure appears to have paid off.

The government said this week that it is drawing up plans to build low-income housing on the land occupied by the People's Cup and that details of the project will be made public this month.

But the families at the tent city say they're ready to march on the Sao Paulo stadium at a moment's notice if those guarantees fall through.

According to Fortune.com, 'each family's tent is reserving a space representative of the land where they hope to build their permanent homes.'

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