Rare redo in terrorism records case gets combative

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

Rare redo in terrorism records case gets combative
FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Marshal's office shows terrorism suspect Adel Daoud, of Hillside, Ill. On Wednesday, June 4, 2014, at the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, a prosecutor and the attorney for Daoud, will deliver oral arguments about a trial judge's ruling granting the defense access to secret-court records. Prosecutors say that letting Daoud's lawyers to see the papers submitted to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court could jeopardize national security. But Daoud's lawyers say it's the only way they can guarantee Daoud a fair trial. The 20-year-old Daoud denies trying to ignite a bomb in Chicago in 2012. (AP Photo/U.S. Marshal's office, File)
Defense attorney Thomas Durkin, left, and father of the defendant Ahmed Daoud walk together after attending a hearing for Adel Daoud at the Dirksen U.S. Courthouse in Chicago, Illinois, Monday, September 17, 2012. Daoud was arrested on suspicion of trying to detonate a car bomb in front of a Chicago bar. (Armando L. Sanchez/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images)
Ahmed Daoud, left, father of the defendant Adel Daoud, whispers to Assistant State Defense Attorney Josh Herman after attending a hearing for Adel Daoud at the Dirksen U.S. Courthouse September 17, 2012. Adel Daoud was arrested on suspicion of trying to detonate a car bomb in front of a Chicago bar. (Armando L. Sanchez/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images)
Mona Daoud, right, looks at her husband Ahmed as he fights back tears after responding to a question about their son, Adel Daoud, in the federal courthouse lobby Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, in Chicago. Adel Daoud pleaded not guilty on federal terrorism charges for allegedly trying to set off what he thought was a car bomb in downtown Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Mona Daoud, right, peers over her husband Ahmed's shoulder as their attorney Thomas Durkin, left, responds to a question about their son, Adel Daoud, in the federal courthouse lobby Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, in Chicago. Adel Daoud pleaded not guilty on federal terrorism charges for allegedly trying to set off what he thought was a car bomb in downtown Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Attorney Thomas Durkin, center, leads his client Adel Daoud's parents, Mona, left, and Ahmed, through the federal courthouse lobby Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, in Chicago. Adel Daoud pleaded not guilty on federal terrorism charges for allegedly trying to set off what he thought was a car bomb in downtown Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Attorney Thomas Durkin, left, responds to a question about his client Adel Daoud, as Daoud's parents Ahmed, center, and Mona listen in the federal courthouse lobby Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, in Chicago. Adel Daoud pleaded not guilty on federal terrorism charges for allegedly trying to set off what he thought was a car bomb in downtown Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Attorney for 18-year-old Adel Daoud Thomas Durikn, right, and Daoud's father Ahmed Daoud attend a news conference at the federal courthouse, Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in Chicago. Daud made an initial appearance in court on charges he sought to detonate what he believed to be a car bomb outside a Chicago bar last Friday night. A court affidavit says Daoud was active in jihadist Internet forums. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Attorney for 18-year-old Adel Daoud Thomas Durikn, left, and Daoud's father Ahmed Daoud leave a press conference at the federal courthouse, Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in Chicago. Daud made an initial appearance in court on charges he sought to detonate what he believed to be a car bomb outside a Chicago bar last Friday night. A court affidavit says Daoud was active in jihadist Internet forums. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

CHICAGO (AP) -- A judicial mulligan has taken place in federal court after staff failed last week to record what was supposed to be the only such hearing in a terrorism case touching on surveillance issues raised by Edward Snowden.

The rare do-over Monday at the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago started slowly. One judge even said she'd try to recreate the questions she asked before.

But later, a lawyer for accused terrorist Adel Daoud sparred with presiding Judge Richard Posner. Thomas Durkin asked, "Why are you so hostile? Your tone is hostile."

Posner snapped back, "If you don't answer my questions, I get irritated."

The issue is a trial judge's ruling granting the defense access to intelligence-court records.

Daoud denies trying to ignite a bomb in Chicago in 2012.

Read Full Story

People are Reading