Computer fools humans, passes 'Turing Test' for first time

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Computer Fools Humans, Passes Turing Test For First Time

For the first time ever, a computer has successfully convinced people into thinking it's an actual human in the iconic "Turing Test."

Computer science pioneer Alan Turing created the test in 1950 asking the question, "Can machines think?"
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Computer fools humans, passes 'Turing Test' for first time
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 08: First demonstrated in 1950, this is one of Britain's earliest stored program computers and the oldest complete general purpose electronic computer in Britain. Designed and built at the National Physical Laboratory, Middlesex in 1949-1950, it was based on plans for a larger computer (the ACE) designed by the mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) at NPL between 1945 and 1947. Previously Turing worked on the Colossus computer used in codebreaking at Bletchley Park during World War II. The pilot ACE was estimated to have cost £50,000 to design and build, but by 1954 had earned over £240,000 from advanced scientific and engineering work in various fields including crystallography, aeronautics and computing bomb trajectories. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - JULY 18: Ferranti, a weapons and electronics company, was commissioned by the British government to manufacture this computer. It was based on a prototype known as the Manchester Mark I, which was built at Manchester University in 1946 under the supervision of Professor Max Newman. Alan Turing had previously been involved with the construction of the ACE (Automatic Computing Engine) at the National Physical Laboratory, and with the construction of 'Colossus', the world's first electronic programmable computer, built at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, during WWII. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Alan Turing Statue
Alan Turing
ENGLAND - 1958: English Electric developed several notable pioneering computers during the 1950s. The DEUCE: Digital Electronic Universal Computing Engine, was the first commercially produced digital model and was developed from earlier plans by Alan Turing. 30 were sold and in 1956 one cost ú50,000. The DEUCE took up a huge space compared to modern computers and worked from 1450 thermionic valves which grew hot , blow outs were frequent. However the DEUCE proved a popular innovation and some models were working in to the 1970s. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 08: First demonstrated in 1950, this is one of Britain's earliest stored program computers and the oldest complete general purpose electronic computer in Britain. Designed and built at the National Physical Laboratory, Middlesex in 1949-1950, it was based on plans for a larger computer (the ACE) designed by the mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) at NPL between 1945 and 1947. Previously Turing worked on the Colossus computer used in codebreaking at Bletchley Park during World War II. Pilot ACE was estimated to have cost £50,000 to design and build, but by 1954 had earned over £240,000 from advanced scientific and engineering work in various fields including crystallography, aeronautics and computing bomb trajectories. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 08: First demonstrated in 1950, this is one of Britain's earliest stored program computers and the oldest complete general purpose electronic computer in Britain. Designed and built at the National Physical Laboratory, Middlesex in 1949-1950, it was based on plans for a larger computer (the ACE) designed by the mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) at NPL between 1945 and 1947. Previously Turing worked on the Colossus computer used in codebreaking at Bletchley Park during World War II. Pilot ACE was estimated to have cost £50,000 to design and build, but by 1954 had earned over £240,000 from advanced scientific and engineering work in various fields including crystallography, aeronautics and computing bomb trajectories. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
FILE -- This is a Tuesday, June 25, 2002 file picture, showing a four-rotor Enigma machine, right, once used by the crews of German U-boats in World War II to send coded messages, which British World War II code-breaker mathematician Alan Turing, was instrumental in breaking, and which is widely thought to have been a turning point in the war. Homosexuality was illegal in Britain at that time and Alan Turing received medical treatment following his conviction for what was considered indecency, however British Prime Minister Gordon Brown has apologized for the "inhumane" treatment which was metred out to Turing, in a published apology Friday Sept. 11, 2009. (AP Photo/Alex Dorgan Ross)
UNITED KINGDOM - AUGUST 22: First demonstrated in 1950, this is one of Britain's earliest stored program computers and the oldest complete general purpose electronic computer in Britain. Designed and built at the National Physical Laboratory, Middlesex in 1949-1950, it was based on plans for a larger computer (the ACE) designed by the mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) at NPL between 1945 and 1947. Previously Turing worked on the Colossus computer used in codebreaking at Bletchley Park during World War II. Pilot ACE was estimated to have cost £50,000 to design and build, but by 1954 had earned over £240,000 from advanced scientific and engineering work in various fields including crystallography, aeronautics and computing bomb trajectories. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - JANUARY 02: First demonstrated in 1950, this is one of Britain's earliest stored program computers and the oldest complete general purpose electronic computer in Britain. Designed and built at the National Physical Laboratory, Middlesex in 1949-1950, it was based on plans for a larger computer (the ACE) designed by the mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) at NPL between 1945 and 1947. Previously Turing worked on the Colossus computer used in codebreaking at Bletchley Park during World War II. Pilot ACE was estimated to have cost £50,000 to design and build, but by 1954 had earned over £240,000 from advanced scientific and engineering work in various fields including crystallography, aeronautics and computing bomb trajectories. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Alan Turing Building, Manchester University, Manchester, United Kingdom, Architect Sheppard Robson, Alan Turing Building Manchester University Sheppard Robson Interior View Blackboard With Formulas. (Photo by View Pictures/UIG via Getty Images)
ENGLAND - MAY 06: English Electric developed several notable pioneering computers during the 1950s. The DEUCE: Digital Electronic Universal Computing Engine, was the first commercially produced digital model and was developed from earlier plans by Alan Turing. 30 were sold and in 1956 one cost ú50,000. The DEUCE took up a huge space compared to modern computers and worked from 1450 thermionic valves which grew hot , blow outs were frequent. However the DEUCE proved a popular innovation and some models were working in to the 1970s. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. (Photo by Walter Nurnberg/SSPL/Getty Images)
Alan Turing Building, Manchester University, Manchester, United Kingdom, Architect Sheppard Robson, Alan Turing Building Manchester University Sheppard Robson Exterior View. (Photo by View Pictures/UIG via Getty Images)
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He claimed that if a machine can trick 30% of human participants during a series of conversations, then it is demonstrating behavior that's indistinguishable from actual people.

A supercomputer named Eugene Goostman did just that at the Royal Society in London. A panel of judges wrote out a series of questions while five computers and five humans responded to them. The judges had to determine which answers came from the actual human.

Goostman posed as a 13-year-old boy and managed to convince 33 percent of the judges ... get this ... on the anniversary of Turing's death.
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