Protective coating on Willis Tower Ledge cracks under tourist's feet

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Willis Tower 'Ledge' Cracks Under Tourist's Feet

A California family got more than they bargained for during a trip to the Willis Tower Skydeck, WGNTV reports.
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Protective coating on Willis Tower Ledge cracks under tourist's feet
CHICAGO - JULY 01: Children check out the view from the Ledge, a new glass cube that juts out from the 103rd floor Skydeck of the Sears Tower, during a media preview July 1, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The 1,353 foot high observatory will open to the public tomorrow. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - JULY 01: Visitors check out the view from the Ledge, a new glass cube that juts out from the 103rd floor Skydeck of the Sears Tower, during a media preview July 1, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The 1,353 foot high observatory will open to the public tomorrow. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - JULY 01: Children stand on a glass floor as they check out the view from the Ledge, a new glass cube that juts out from the 103rd floor Skydeck of the Sears Tower, during a media preview July 1, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The 1,353 foot high observatory will open to the public tomorrow. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - JULY 01: Visitors check out a helicopter from the Ledge, a new glass cube that juts out from the 103rd floor Skydeck of the Sears Tower, during a media preview July 1, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The 1,353 foot high observatory will open to the public tomorrow. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - JULY 01: Visitors walk out on the Ledge, a new glass cube that juts out from the 103rd floor Skydeck of the Sears Tower, during a media preview July 1, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The 1,353 foot high observatory will open to the public tomorrow. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - JULY 01: Sam Kane lays on the floor of the Ledge, a new glass cube that juts out from the 103rd floor Skydeck of the Sears Tower, during a media preview July 1, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The 1,353 foot high observatory will open to the public tomorrow. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - JULY 01: A visitor stands out on the Ledge, a new glass cube that juts out from the 103rd floor Skydeck of the Sears Tower, during a media preview July 1, 2009 in Chicago, Illinois. The 1,353 foot high observatory will open to the public tomorrow. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Zac Vawter, fitted with an experimental "bionic" leg, looks out onto the Ledge at the Willis Tower, Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012 in Chicago. Vawter is training for the world's tallest stair-climbing event where he'll attempt to climb 103 flights to the top of the Willis Tower using the new prosthesis. Vawter will put his bionic leg to the ultimate test Sunday, Nov. 4, when he attempts to climb 103 flights of stairs to the top of Chicago's Willis Tower, one of the world's tallest skyscrapers. If all goes well, he'll make history with the bionic leg's public debut. (AP Photo/Brian Kersey)
FILE - In this July 1, 2009 file photo, Anna Kane, 5, of Alton, Ill., looks down from "The Ledge," at the Sears Tower in Chicago. The series of glass bays jut out from the 103rd floor of the building, now called the Willis Tower. Nearly six million people have stepped out onto see-through ledges since the tourist attraction opened. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
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Alejandro Garibay, his brother and two cousins were visiting Chicago's tallest building Wednesday night and decided to get some photos from The Ledge - a glass enclosure which looks down from 1,353 feet above the city. But when they stepped into one of the four glass enclosures, they say they felt the glass crack under their feet.

"So as we're taking last-minute pictures, we're sitting down on top of the deck. And maybe we were there for 30, 45 seconds, maybe a minute at most, and as we're getting up to get out because they were soon to close, the deck just cracked beneath us," Garibay said.

According to a spokesman with the Willis Tower, the glass deck didn't crack. It was actually a protective coating on the glass that shattered.

"The Ledge was designed with a protective coating that completely covers all glass surfaces to protect against scratches," spokesman Brian Rehme said in a statement. "This coating does not affect the structural integrity of The Ledge in any way. Occasionally, the coating will crack, as it is designed to in order to protect the surface of the glass."

Skydeck Chicago is open Thursday and operating as normal while the protective coating is replaced.
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