Thai coup leaders summon academics, journalists

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Thai coup leaders summon academics, journalists
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha prays during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha holds flowers during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha adjusts his cap during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha waves before leaving after attending 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers parade during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha walks during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai police major General Naiyawat Phadermchit speaks to the media outside Lat Phrao police station in Bangkok on August 19, 2014. Thai authorities said that they were testing the DNA of a Japanese man at the centre of a 'baby factory' scandal to determine if he is the biological father. AFP PHOTO / Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Thailand's new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan–ocha salutes upon arrival to attend an establishment anniversary of the 21st Infantry Regiment, Queen's Guard, in Chonburi Province, Thailand, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan–ocha waves on departure after attending an establishment anniversary of the 21st Infantry Regiment, Queen's Guard in Chonburi Province ,Thailand .Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan–ocha arrives to attend an establishment anniversary of the 21st Infantry Regiment, Queen's Guard in Chonburi Province ,Thailand .Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan–ocha salutes upon arrival to attend an establishment anniversary of the 21st Infantry Regiment, Queen's Guard in Chonburi Province, Thailand .Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thailand's new Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, right, arrives for an establishment anniversary of the 21st infantry regiment, Queen's Guard in Chonburi Province, Thailand, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Three months after overthrowing Thailand's last elected government, this Southeast Asian nation's junta leader is stepping out of his army uniform for good - to take up the post of prime minister in a move critics say will only extend his time at the helm and consolidate the military's grip on power. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thailand's Army commander Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, left, arrives at the Royal Thai Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, June 13, 2014. The head of Thailand's military junta said Friday that an interim government would be set up by September, offering the most specific timeline yet on a possible transfer of power after last month's coup. (AP Photo/ASTV Manager newspaper) THAILAND OUT
Thai police officers get order as they are deployed for security in Bangkok's Victory Monument, Thailand, Sunday, June 8, 2014. Thai police warned online critics of the military junta Friday that they will "come get you" for posting political views that could incite divisiveness, the latest reminder about surveillance of social media in post-coup Thailand. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Protesters confront soldiers in riot gear blocking the route of an anti-coup march on May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai capital has seen several anti-coup rallies since the military seized control on May 22. Thailand's ruling military has declared martial law that bans public assembly and imposes a night-time curfew. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Thai army soldiers are briefed by an officer before deploying to an anti-coup rally on May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai capital has seen several anti-coup rallies since the military seized control on May 22. Thailand's ruling military has declared martial law that bans public assembly and imposes a night-time curfew. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: People gather to make anti-coup protest in Bangkok, Thailand on 24 May, 2014. Soldiers do not intervene protestors although anti-coup protest is forbidden in Thailand. (Photo by Vinai Dithajohn/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Thai military wear riot shields as tensions increase during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Protesters holds signs during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24; Thai protesters fight with police and military trying to arrest them during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
An anti-coup protester is taken away from the site of a gathering by Thai soldiers in Bangkok on May 24, 2014. Thailand's military will detain former premier Yingluck Shinawatra and ousted government leaders for up to one week, the army said on May 24, tightening its grip over the country following a coup that has provoked an international outcry. AFP PHOTO / Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester is detained by Thai soldiers during an anti-coup demonstration at the Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand, Saturday, May 24, 2014. Thailand's coup leaders said Saturday that they would keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders detained for up to a week to give them "time to think" and to keep the country calm. They also summoned outspoken academics to report to the junta. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers are pushed by protesters as they move in to disperse a protest against the coup outside a shopping complex in Bangkok, Thailand Saturday, May 24, 2014. Thailand's coup leaders said Saturday they will keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders detained for up to a week to give them "time to think" and to keep the country calm. They also summoned outspoken academics to report to the junta. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
This photo taken off the TV screen shows the blue screen with military crests that replaced all TV programming in Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Thailand’s junta has commandeered every TV channel for round-the-clock broadcasts of dour announcements and patriotic hymns. The public’s verdict: DJ, please change the soundtrack. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers stand insid Thai TV 3 in Bangkok, Thailand Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law in a surprise announcement before dawn Tuesday that it said was aimed at keeping the country stable after six months of sometimes violent political unrest. The military, however, denied a coup d'etat was underway. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Armed Thai soldiers patrol on a motorbike near the Democracy Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Thailand's ruling military on Friday summoned the entire ousted government and members of the politically influential family at the heart of the country's long-running conflict, a day after it seized control of this volatile Southeast Asian nation in a non-violent coup. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 22: A woman uses a phone to capture Thai army soldiers securing the grounds of the venue for peace talks between pro- and anti-government groups on May 22, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power amid reports that leaders of the opposing groups attending the talks were being detained by the military. Thailand has seen months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 22: Press pose for a portrait with Thai army soldiers standing guard at the grounds of the venue for peace talks between pro- and anti-government groups on May 22, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power amid reports that leaders of the opposing groups attending the talks were being detained by the military. Thailand has seen months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers patrol on foot on a road near the rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis prepared Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers stand guard after army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha met with anti-government and pro-government leaders at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief announced in an address to the nation on Thursday that the armed forces were seizing power after months of deadly political turmoil. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
A tourist walks past Thai soldiers guard on a street in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
A Thai soldier stands guard on a street in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai soldiers chat inside a tent on an overpass while providing security near a rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis prepared Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers carry packs of drinking water while providing security near a rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis prepared Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A motorcyclist and his passenger ride past Thai soldiers standing guard at the gate to the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis met Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Two Thai soldiers, left, follow two military police officers while guarding the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis met Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers gather while waiting for an order at the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis met Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
An armed Thai soldier is reflected in a puddle as he guards a road near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier checks barbed wire while guarding a road near pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
An armed Thai soldier, right, helps an aged woman down the stairs of a pedestrian bridge near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 20, 2014 file photo, Thai soldiers stand guard outside Government House compound of prime minister's office in Bangkok as Thailand's army declared martial law before dawn Tuesday in a surprise announcement it said was aimed at keeping the country stable after six months of turbulent political unrest. Thailand’s army has always played a major role in politics, seizing power at least 11 times in the last century. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit, File)
A Buddhist monk walks past a Thai soldier who provides security near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers unload equipments from a truck while providing security near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier looks at a motorcyclist riding past while providing security near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers set up tent on a pedestrian bridge near the pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand began its second day under martial law Wednesday with little visible military presence on the streets of Bangkok as residents tried to make sense of the dramatic turn of events after six months of anti-government protests and political turmoil. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier guards on a street in Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's powerful military chief intervened Tuesday for the first time in the country's latest political crisis, declaring martial law and dispatching gun-mounted jeeps into the heart of the capital with a vow to resolve the deepening conflict as quickly as possible. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
A Thai mother and daughter have their photograph taken with a soldier guarding the area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai soldier takes a break while guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A man, center, hands a cold drink to Thai soldiers guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers push a school van while guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers circle to get orders from their superior, left, while guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers push a school car while guarding an area near a pro-government demonstration site on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
A Thai reporter browses his mobile phone while sitting next to a line of Thai soldiers standing guarding inside the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Armed with shields, Thai soldiers march in line to provide security outside a meeting hall at the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers march while providing security inside the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Armed with shields that read "Army" Thai soldiers march in line to provide security outside a meeting hall of the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
A Thai reporter poses for a photograph with a group of Thai soldiers standing guard at the compound of the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai Army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) speaks next to Navy chief Narong Pipatanasai (L) and Air Chief Marshal Prajin Jantong (R) during a press conference at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Thai army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha gives a traditional greeting to delegates prior to a meeting at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha gives a traditional greeting to delegates during a meeting at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A Thai army soldier stands guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers patrol the offices of the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Passersby photo Thai army soldiers standing guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: View of a gun mounted on a Thai army vehicle as soldiers stand guard on a busy city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Passersby pose for a photo with Thai army soldiers standing guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A foreign tourist poses for a photo as Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A Thai army officer briefs soldiers standing guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Royal Thai Army soldiers keep watch from a military vehicle while stationed outside the Royal Thai Police headquarters as traffic drives past in central Bangkok, Thailand, on Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Thailand's army imposed martial law nationwide after months of political turmoil that brought down an elected leader and tipped the economy into a contraction. Photographer: Dario Pignatelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Thai army soldiers take a break from checkpoint near where pro-government ''Red shirts'' have been rallying for days on the outskirts of Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law across the deeply divided kingdom on May 20 to restore order after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in the capital but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO/ Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai army soldiers take a break at a checkpoint near where pro-government ''Red shirts'' have been rallying for days on the outskirts of Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law across the deeply divided kingdom on May 20 to restore order after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in the capital but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO/ Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers walk after being deployed to guard in Bangkok's Victory Monument, Thailand, Sunday, June 8, 2014. Thai police warned online critics of the military junta Friday that they will "come get you" for posting political views that could incite divisiveness, the latest reminder about surveillance of social media in post-coup Thailand. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
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By TODD PITMAN and THANYARAT DOKSONE
Associated Press

BANGKOK (AP) -- In a chilling move apparently aimed at neutralizing critics and potential opposition, Thailand's new army junta on Saturday ordered dozens of outspoken activists, academics and journalists to surrender themselves to military authorities.

The junta, which is already holding most of the government it ousted in a coup Thursday in secret locations against their will, said it would keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and others in custody for up to a week to give them "time to think" and keep the country calm.

Two days after the army seized power in the nation's first coup in eight years, it also faced scattered protests that came amid growing concern over the junta's intentions. Also Saturday, the military dissolved the Senate - the last functioning democratic institution left, and absorbed its legislative powers.

"Military rule has thrown Thailand's rights situation into a free fall," said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. "The army is using draconian martial law powers to detain politicians, activists and journalists, to censor media, and to ban all public gatherings. This rolling crackdown needs to come to an end immediately."

At least 100 people, mostly top politicians, have been detained incommunicado so far. Deputy army spokesman Col. Weerachon Sukondhapatipak said they were all being well-treated and the military's aim was to achieve a political compromise.

Weerachon said all those held have had their cellphones confiscated because "we don't want them communicating with other people. We want them to be themselves and think on their own."

"This is because everybody involved in the conflict needs to calm down and have time to think," Weerachon said. "We don't intend to limit their freedom - it's to relieve the pressure."

In a military order broadcast at the start of the day, the junta summoned 35 more people, including politicians, political activists and, for the first time, outspoken academics and some journalists.

One of those on the list, Kyoto University professor of Southeast Asian studies Pavin Chachavalpongpun, said by telephone from Japan that he would not turn himself in. He said the summons meant the junta felt insecure.

"The military claiming to be a mediator in the Thai conflict, that is all just nonsense," said Pavin, who is frequently quoted by foreign media as an analyst. "This is not about paving the way for reform and democratization. We are really going back to the crudest form of authoritarianism."

In the evening, the junta broadcast its sixth official order, for a single journalist: Pravit Rojanaphruk, an outspoken columnist for the English-language daily The Nation, who was summoned to report to the army at 10 a.m. Sunday. In a tweet Saturday night, Pravit was defiant, saying "the more they exercise their illegitimate power the more illegitimate they become."

The junta also ordered banks to freeze the assets of two top politicians it had summoned but who remain in hiding, including the ousted education minister and the chief of the former ruling party.

Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, who leads the junta, has justified the coup by saying the army had to act to avert violence and end half a year of political turmoil triggered by anti-government protests that killed 28 people and injured more than 800.

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Thai farmers battle with soldiers as they protest the government's repeatedly delayed payments for rice submitted to the pledging scheme at the government's temporary office in Bangkok on February 17, 2014. Thai opposition demonstrators besieged government offices on February 17, including a compound that has been used as a temporary headquarters by Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, in defiance of authorities who have vowed to reclaim key state buildings. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers stand guard to block anti-government protesters, left, during a rally outside the office of the permanent secretary for defense where Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra was reportedly working inside Monday, Feb. 3, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thai protesters vowed Monday to stage larger rallies in central Bangkok and push ahead their efforts to nullify the results of elections that were expected to prolong a national political crisis. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai soldiers photograph a meeting between Buddha Issara, a leader of anti-government protesters, and a police commander through a video conference at a protest encampment on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand, Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. Buddha Issara said he can not return the occupied protest site to Thai authorities because police could not guarantee the safety of protesters if outsiders were allowed to past through the compound. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai soldiers stand guard to block anti-government protesters, left, during a rally outside the office of the permanent secretary for defense where Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra was reportedly working inside Monday, Feb. 3, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thai protesters vowed Monday to stage larger rallies in central Bangkok and push ahead their efforts to nullify the results of elections that were expected to prolong a national political crisis. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Thai soldiers move in to protect their office as anti-government protesters stage a rally outside the office of the permanent secretary for defense where Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra was reportedly working inside, Monday, Feb. 3, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thai protesters vowed Monday to stage larger rallies in central Bangkok and push ahead their efforts to nullify the results of elections that were expected to prolong a national political crisis. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn)
Thai army soldiers document anti-government protesters as they rally outside the Permanent Secretary of Defense in Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. Gunmen shot and wounded a top leader of a major pro-government movement in northern Thailand on Wednesday, and demonstrators pushing to overthrow the prime minister defied the start of a state of emergency imposed in the capital to cope with the nation's increasingly bloody political crisis. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Thai army soldiers stand guard as anti-government protesters rally outside the Permanent Secretary of Defense in Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. Gunmen shot and wounded a top leader of a major pro-government movement in northern Thailand on Wednesday, and demonstrators pushing to overthrow the prime minister defied the start of a state of emergency imposed in the capital to cope with the nation's increasingly bloody political crisis. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Thai farmers battle with soldiers as they protest the government's repeatedly delayed payments for rice submitted to the pledging scheme at the government's temporary office in Bangkok on February 17, 2014. Thai opposition demonstrators besieged government offices on February 17, including a compound that has been used as a temporary headquarters by Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, in defiance of authorities who have vowed to reclaim key state buildings. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers stand guard during a protest against the government's repeatedly delayed payments for rice submitted to the pledging scheme at the government's temporary office in Bangkok on February 17, 2014. Thai opposition demonstrators besieged government offices on February 17, including a compound that has been used as a temporary headquarters by Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, in defiance of authorities who have vowed to reclaim key state buildings. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai farmers battle with soldiers as they protest the government's repeatedly delayed payments for rice submitted to the pledging scheme at the government's temporary office in Bangkok on February 17, 2014. Thai opposition demonstrators besieged government offices on February 17, including a compound that has been used as a temporary headquarters by Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, in defiance of authorities who have vowed to reclaim key state buildings. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai farmers battle with soldiers as they protest the government's repeatedly delayed payments for rice submitted to the pledging scheme at the government's temporary office in Bangkok on February 17, 2014. Thai opposition demonstrators besieged government offices on February 17, including a compound that has been used as a temporary headquarters by Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, in defiance of authorities who have vowed to reclaim key state buildings. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai farmers battle with soldiers as they protest the government's repeatedly delayed payments for rice submitted to the pledging scheme at the government's temporary office in Bangkok on February 17, 2014. Thai opposition demonstrators besieged government offices on February 17, including a compound that has been used as a temporary headquarters by Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, in defiance of authorities who have vowed to reclaim key state buildings. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
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The intractable divide plaguing Thailand today is part of an increasingly precarious power struggle between an elite, conservative minority backed by powerful businessmen and staunch royalists based in Bangkok and the south that can no longer win elections, and the political machine of exiled former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and his supporters in the rural north who backed him because of populist policies such as virtually free health care.

The army deposed Thaksin in a 2006 coup. And on Friday, it detained his sister, Yingluck, who was forced from office earlier this month by a controversial court verdict for abuse of power, which she denies.

The ruling party, which rose to power in a landslide election in 2011 that was deemed fair, had insisted for months that Thailand's fragile democracy was under attack from protesters, the courts and, finally, the army which together had rendered it powerless, step by step.

Although Thailand has been calm since the coup and there is little military presence on the streets, small-scale protests against the junta have been reported in the northern city of Chiang Mai and the beach resort city of Pattaya, south of Bangkok.

In the capital, life largely went on as normal. But hundreds of anti-coup protesters took to the streets for a second straight day, defying an army-imposed edict banning groups larger than five from gathering for political purposes. They shouted slogans demanding a return to civilian rule and waved signs outside a cinema complex before moving on to Victory Monument, a major city landmark several kilometers (miles) away.

The demonstrators briefly confronted rows of soldiers and police lined up with riot shields on a road leading to the monument, with a few scuffles breaking out before most of the protesters broke away. By late afternoon, about 500 demonstrators had gathered at the moment. Army and police presence was low key, and the groups dispersed before a 10 p.m. curfew came into effect.

Several demonstrators have been detained, and rights groups have expressed concern over the growing repression.

"This is a dangerous precedent - people simply expressing opinions must not be penalized," said Richard Bennett, Amnesty International's Asia Pacific Director. "The need for the military to exercise restraint is particularly crucial given that demonstrations calling for civilian rule could intensify."

The army launched the coup after ordering two days of brief peace talks in which the country's political rivals failed to end their deadlock. Anti-government protesters had been calling for the army to intervene and support their bid to overthrow the government, which they accused of corruption, since November.

Multiple nations have condemned the coup. The U.S. State Department urged "the immediate restoration of civilian rule and release of detained political leaders, a return to democracy through early elections, and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms."

Washington also said it had canceled ongoing military exercises, and a firearms training program for the Thai police. Pentagon press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said U.S. law and "our own democratic principles" require the U.S. to reconsider its long military relationship with the Southeast Asian country.

The Pentagon is also canceling the June visit of U.S. Pacific Fleet Commander Admiral Harry Harris to Thailand and is withdrawing the invitation to the commander general of the Royal Thai Armed Forces to visit U.S. Pacific Command in June, Kirby said.

Underscoring the challenges facing Thailand's new rulers, police on Saturday said suspected Islamic insurgents detonated at least nine bombs in the country's restive south, killing two people and wounding at least 52. Pattani provincial police chief Phote Suaisuwan said the blasts hit four 7-11 convenience stores, two gasoline stations and three other locations.

It was unlikely that the blasts were related to the coup, though insurgents may have been emboldened by the dramatic development. More than 5,000 people have been killed since the insurgency flared in 2004 in Thailand's predominantly Muslim south.

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Associated Press writers Kay Johnson, Grant Peck and Jocelyn Gecker contributed to this report.

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