Thai Army: Ex-PM, protest leaders held 'to think'

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Thai Army: Ex-PM, protest leaders held 'to think'
A Thai anti-coup protester holds a banner during a protest outside a shopping complex in Bangkok, Thailand Saturday, May 24, 2014. Thailand's coup leaders said Saturday that they would keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders detained for up to a week to give them "time to think" and to keep the country calm. They also summoned outspoken academics to report to the junta. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai anti-coup protesters hold up banners during a protest outside a shopping complex in Bangkok, Thailand Saturday, May 24, 2014. Thailand's coup leaders said Saturday that they would keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders detained for up to a week to give them "time to think" and to keep the country calm. They also summoned outspoken academics to report to the junta. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai female police officers take position outside a shopping complex where anti-coup protest took place in Bangkok, Thailand Saturday, May 24, 2014. Thailand's coup leaders said Saturday that they would keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders detained for up to a week to give them "time to think" and to keep the country calm. They also summoned outspoken academics to report to the junta. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai anti-coup protesters chant slogans during a protest outside a shopping complex in Bangkok, Thailand Saturday, May 24, 2014. Thailand's coup leaders said Saturday that they would keep former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders detained for up to a week to give them "time to think" and to keep the country calm. They also summoned outspoken academics to report to the junta. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
A motorcyclist rides past Thai soldiers blocking the road to prevent activists and pro-government protesters from gathering to protest against the coup in downtown Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Ousted members of Thailand's former government turned themselves in to the country's new military junta Friday, as soldiers forcefully dispersed hundreds of anti-coup activists who defied a ban on large-scale gatherings to protest the army's seizure of power. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers stand guarding an overpass to prevent activists and pro-government protesters from gathering to protest against the coup in downtown Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Ousted members of Thailand's former government turned themselves in to the country's new military junta Friday, as soldiers forcefully dispersed hundreds of anti-coup activists who defied a ban on large-scale gatherings to protest the army's seizure of power. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers detain Apichat Pongsawat, right, an activist who staged a protest against the coup in downtown Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Ousted members of Thailand's former government turned themselves in to the country's new military junta Friday, as soldiers forcefully dispersed hundreds of anti-coup activists who defied a ban on large-scale gatherings to protest the army's seizure of power. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
A Thai soldier, second right, talks with passers-by on a street in Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Thailand's ruling military on Friday summoned the entire ousted government and members of the politically influential family at the heart of the country's long-running conflict, a day after it seized control of this volatile Southeast Asian nation in a non-violent coup. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai soldiers walk during a foot patrol past a woman in Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Thailand's ruling military on Friday summoned the entire ousted government and members of the politically influential family at the heart of the country's long-running conflict, a day after it seized control of this volatile Southeast Asian nation in a non-violent coup. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
A Thai soldier, right, reacts to a student holding an anti-coup sign as the student tries to take a photo with the soldier during a brief protest near the Democracy Monument in Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Thailand's ruling military on Friday summoned the entire ousted government and members of the politically influential family at the heart of the country's long-running conflict, a day after it seized control of this volatile Southeast Asian nation in a non-violent coup. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
A small group of Thai students, background, are barred by armed soldiers from entering the Democracy Monument area during a brief protest in Bangkok, Thailand Friday, May 23, 2014. Thailand's ruling military on Friday summoned the entire ousted government and members of the politically influential family at the heart of the country's long-running conflict, a day after it seized control of this volatile Southeast Asian nation in a non-violent coup. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai Army Chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha speaks during a news conference at the army club Tuesday, May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's army declared martial law before dawn Tuesday in a surprise announcement it said was aimed at keeping the country stable after six months of turbulent political unrest. The military, however, insisted a coup d’etat was not underway. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
Thai and foreign journalists watch and listen to the announcement of Thai Armed Forces chiefs on the coup through television at the press center at the Army Club in Bangkok, Thailand Thursday, May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief announced a military takeover of the government Thursday, saying the coup was necessary to restore stability and order after six months of political deadlock and turmoil. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)
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BANGKOK (AP) - A spokesman for Thailand's coup leaders says the army will detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Cabinet members and anti-government protest leaders for up to a week to give them "time to think."

Deputy army spokesman Col. Weerachon Sukondhapatipak said Saturday that Yingluck and dozens of other political figures have had their phones confiscated. He would not reveal their location.

The move appears aimed at preventing any political leaders from contacting supporters to rally them against the coup.

The military seized power on Thursday after two days of peace talks in which neither political faction would agree to step aside. The junta says it acted to prevent more turmoil after months of sometimes violent street protests and deadlock between the elected government and protesters supported by Thailand's elite establishment.

Thai Military To Detain Ex-Prime Minister For Up To A Week

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