Moore tornado survivor has 'miracle baby'

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Moore Tornado Survivor Has 'Miracle Baby'

MOORE, Okla. – Plaza Towers 1st grade teacher Karen Marinelli was crouched over 3 small children in the hallway when tornado sirens began their high-pitched squeal, KFOR reports.

Marinelli said, "It's going to hit, it's going to hit. I can't believe it's really going to hit."

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Karen Marinelli
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Moore tornado survivor has 'miracle baby'
This is the car that Karen was trapped under. It blew toward the school, knocked over a wall ... and fell on top of her.
Karen suffered a broken back, sprains and too many cuts and bruises to count.
Karen today.
Some of Karen's tornado relief boxes.
Karen's miracle baby!
Karen's beautiful family, now complete.
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There were kids screaming, glass breaking and that unforgettable roar.

Marinelli said, "The best description we could all come up with, it was a monster. It sounds like a monster. It sounds like a monster devouring something. It is that loud and encompassing that you feel like something is surrounding you and gobbling you up."

Those 6-year-olds in her care, were not injured. But Karen suffered a broken back, sprains and too many cuts and bruises to count.

Karen was crushed under a cinder block wall and a 2,000-lb car. "That car is what blew in that knocked over that wall -- with that force -- on top of me."

Unable to move, she was carried out on a makeshift backboard, shuttled to a waiting ambulance on the hood of a Jeep.

Karen would spend the next 3 months in a wheelchair, recovering from those crippling injuries.

One day, she finally got around to opening tornado relief boxes she had received from strangers around the country.

Plaza Towers school then and now:

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Plaza Towers then and now
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Moore tornado survivor has 'miracle baby'
A school crossing sign is lodged in the tornado rubble outside Plaza Towers elementary school in Moore, Okla., Monday, May 27, 2013. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
FILE - LaTisha Garcia carries her 8-year-old daughter, Jazmin Rodriguez, near Plaza Towers Elementary School, May 20, 2013, after a massive tornado carved its way through Moore, Okla., leaving little of the school and neighborhood. This image was chosen by the Associated Press as one of the top 10 news photos representing the top stories of 2013. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
Construction work on a safe room for the new Plaza Towers Elementary school is pictured in Moore, Okla., Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, behind the crosses erected in memory of the seven students who died at the school during the May 20th tornado, six months ago. Once completed, the safe room will be able to accommodate all of the students at the new school. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Construction work on a safe room for the new Plaza Towers Elementary school continues in Moore, Okla., Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, behind the crosses erected in memory of the seven students who died at the school in the May 20th tornado, six months ago. Once completed, the safe room will be able to accommodate all of the students at the new school. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Steve Adams works at removing the slab from a home across from the Plaza Towers Elementary school in Moore, Okla., Monday, July 22, 2013. School officials in the Oklahoma city of Moore say students whose schools were destroyed in the deadly May tornado will attend classes next month in a refurbished junior high school building and a local church. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Construction work on a safe room for the new Plaza Towers Elementary school continues in Moore, Okla., Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, behind the crosses erected in memory of the seven students who died at the school in the May 20th tornado, six months ago. Once completed, the safe room will be able to accommodate all of the students at the new school. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Construction work continues on the new Plaza Towers Elementary school in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, May 20, 2014, one year after the May 20, 2013 tornado destroyed the school, killing seven students. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
This May 15, 2014, aerial photo shows the new Plaza Towers Elementary school, still under construction, in the Plaza Towers neighborhood in Moore, Okla. Many new homes are replacing the ones destroyed by the May 20, 2013 tornado. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
A tree which was ravaged by the May 20th tornado and has been named the "Hope Tree" by fourth grade teacher Kimberly Martinez, is pictured in front of the new Plaza Towers Elementary school in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, May 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
** HOLD FOR JENNY KANE FOR MOORE TORNADO SCHOOL ** A tree which was ravaged by the May 20th tornado and has been named the "Hope Tree" by fourth grade teacher Kimberly Martinez, is pictured through the fence in front of the new Plaza Towers Elementary school in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, May 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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Inside one box, diapers and eight new baby girl outfits. Karen had no intention of having another baby. This is a family of boys, 5 to 14. They dismissed the notion and tucked away the cute, frilly little onesies to donate later.

Not long after that mystery box arrived, the Marinelli family learned they were about to receive another special delivery. Karen was pregnant.

The baby was scheduled to arrive on May 20th ... a year to the day that the horrific "monster" stole so much, from so many.

Karen said, "Just seems like it was meant to be. I know she was meant to be. She was meant to be our blessing, definitely. I think she's going to wrap us up. A nice little bow, the topper on the cake."

Babies are as unpredictable as the weather. Lily arrived a little early, May 8th. Her name means "return to happiness."

Karen called it, "A beautiful and unexpected blessing, a new season." For a family, and community that has endured so much.

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