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Rare Van Gogh, Rockwell paintings uncovered

Rare Van Gogh, Rockwell Paintings Uncovered

Two paintings with a lot of history have just recently been unearthed.

El Mundo reports tax collectors in Spain found a lost painting - a van Gogh work dating back to 1889, according to art experts. Seals on the back indicate it has belonged to three different museums during its history.

The painting, titled "Cypress Sky and Country," was found in a Spanish tax offender's safety deposit box after it had been missing for almost 40 years. Nazis had taken the painting from a Dutch museum during their occupation of the Netherlands.

One of the painting's seals lists its last location as the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, Austria. It's unknown how the painting left that museum or whether it was stolen.

The painting's value is also unclear, but van Gogh had reportedly painted several similar versions of this artwork. One of them sold for $57 million dollars more than 20 years ago and currently hangs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.



Another famous painting was brought out of storage in Massachusetts after it hung in a school principal's office for 50 years.

According to WBZ-TV, the painting dates back to 1941 and was a gift to the principal from the artist Norman Rockwell.

The painting was one of many of Rockwell's artworks intended for The Saturday Evening Post's cover, but this one never made the cut.

The original painting depicts World War II, a recurring character seen in other paintings as he rides with soldiers in the back of a military vehicle. According to a Rockwell Museum official, they didn't even know it existed.

The Boston Globe reports Rockwell gave the principal the painting as a gift for graduating seniors. It was then put into storage in 2001 when school officials feared it would be stolen.

The painting will be auctioned off later this month with 10 other Rockwell paintings at Sotheby's in New York. It was estimated to be worth at least $1.5 million.

A previous Rockwell painting titled "Saying Grace" sold for a hefty $46 million in December. It appeared on the Saturday Evening Post's cover in 1955.

The mayor and school officials plan to use the money from the auction to start a foundation benefiting schools.

Join the discussion

1000|Char. 1000  Char.
Mike May 12 2014 at 9:50 AM

A foundation benefiting schools...aka...they plan for it to disappear into the administrators pockets just like most of the money we dump into schools.

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2 replies
posthuf Mike May 12 2014 at 10:25 AM

Now, now, now Mike.

We must keep the teachers unions happy.

Flag Reply 0 rate up
Carol Mike May 12 2014 at 10:29 AM

And you know this for a fact how? Would be nice if they sued you for slander.

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mvp3395 May 11 2014 at 8:12 PM

Return it to the heirs you scavengers

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1 reply
hellyon3too mvp3395 May 11 2014 at 9:51 PM

Did you read all the way through the article?

"Rockwell gave the principal the painting as a gift for graduating seniors. " Seeing as it was a gift to graduating seniors, just exactly who do you think the "heirs" are?

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JTalltrees1 May 11 2014 at 8:21 PM

i c my fake made it

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1 reply
tstreasure JTalltrees1 May 12 2014 at 10:36 AM

LOL, now if you just get some of those millions from the sale :-)

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fred May 11 2014 at 8:51 PM

Proceeds from the sale should help pay for ObumerCare.

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6 replies
mortwiw May 11 2014 at 8:57 PM

If the Nazis took the van Gogh from a Netherlands' museum during their occupation of that country then it is an absolute "no brainer" that it should go back to the Netherlands.

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1 reply
Pearltrans mortwiw May 12 2014 at 12:26 PM

Anything stolen does not belong to the thief, and does not belong to anyone who gets it from the thief. The article states that it is not known whether the Van Gogh was stolen or not.

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kingofswords72 May 11 2014 at 9:23 PM

Sure glad they showed us the Rockwell picture that hung in the principle's office. Where is it?

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1 reply
luvmymate kingofswords72 May 11 2014 at 9:46 PM

Watch the video and you will see it!

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sjlapp May 11 2014 at 9:51 PM

Glad to see Rockwell finally getting his due recognition as a great artist. In the 70's a Rockwell original could be purchased for well less than $10,000.

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1 reply
roseyoungstewart sjlapp May 12 2014 at 12:46 AM

and smardass?.... just what is $10,000 today as compared to $10,000 45 yrs ago?

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dawntreaderauto May 11 2014 at 10:22 PM

interesting, the mayor and school officicals plan to use the money. the painting is not thiers it was given to the principal, not the school system, therefore it belongs to the mans estate. don't you love have they try to grab everything. he was probably a dedicated employee for 30 years or more and this is what he gets

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2 replies
pdbocc dawntreaderauto May 11 2014 at 10:41 PM

Please read the quote below from the article. I think the words "as a gift for graduating seniors" pretty much makes it the property of the school.
"The Boston Globe reports Rockwell gave the principal the painting as a gift for graduating seniors. It was then put into storage in 2001 when school officials feared it would be stolen."

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jelun dawntreaderauto May 11 2014 at 10:52 PM

Please read the full article.

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BRYANT May 11 2014 at 11:07 PM

The second paragraph says that it was given to the principal. The fifth says it was a gift for graduating seniors. Someone would have to prove that it was given, in trust, for "graduating seniors" - and then any sale money seemingly would have to be split between those seniors. The school knew what it had, which is why they put it in storage. Why the pulled it out now is the question. Did the principal die recently?

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2 replies
o2bncapecod BRYANT May 11 2014 at 11:14 PM

Situations such as this are always murky but I believe if he (Rockwell) gave the gift to the principal for graduating seniors, it was, essentially, a gift to the school not individual seniors. It should remain in the school as his token towards it and not be sold. If sold, proceeds should go to that particular school, not be shared with either individuals or the entire school system but, perhaps, as funds necessary to update and keep that school going. But, that's my opinion.

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1 reply
jkb8729 o2bncapecod May 12 2014 at 1:15 AM

This is the only comment that makes sense of the reason for the gift. It was not given as the principal's property but as gift for (all) graduating seniors of that school. How to use it in that manner, if at all, is questionable. It is valuable now that it is in the news and therefore needs protection. It then would seem that a school board would have to make a determination of how to benefit the particular school and the future graduating seniors and not risk the loss of the bequest.

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roseyoungstewart BRYANT May 12 2014 at 12:42 AM

THE DAMNED LETTER SAID IT WAS GIVEN TO THE F'N PRINCIPAL FOR THE GRADUATING SENIORS.and it hung in his damned office 50 years. READ. READ...

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1 reply
proteus12544 roseyoungstewart May 12 2014 at 4:30 AM

wow. I hope you do not work at a stressful job because if you are this upset over a comment I cannot imagine how you would be in a stressful situation. Its only words. Calm down

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Karen May 12 2014 at 12:24 AM

Every single time I look at a Van Gogh and those freaky sky/clouds it makes me want to lose my meal.

Don't know what it is, but those are depressing and claustrophobic.

I wouldn't give somebody a nickel for any of them.

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7 replies
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