Plan for unidentified 9/11 remains draws protest

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Plan For Unidentified 9/11 Remains Draws Protest
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Plan for unidentified 9/11 remains draws protest
Rosaleen Tallon, sister of firefighter Sean Tallon, killed in the 9-11 World Trade Center attacks and other 9-11 victims' family members hold a press conference in front of a fire station opposite the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York, Thursday, May 8, 2014. The families oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed to on the memorialplaza level. From left are Rosemary Cain, Sally Regenhard, attorney Noman Siegel, Rosaleen Tallon, and retired New York City Fire Chief Jim Riches. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Attorney Norman Siegel, center, points to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum during a press conference with family members of first responders killed in the World Trade Center attacks in New York, Thursday, May 8, 2014. The families oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed on the memorial plaza level. The families represented Thursday say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains in the museum basement which flooded during Superstorm Sandy. From left are Rosemary Cain, Sally Regenhard, Siegel, Jim Riches, and Rosaleen Tallon. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Rosaleen Tallon, left, sister of firefighter Sean Tallon killed in the 9-11 World Trade Center attacks, embraces Rosemary Cain, who lost her son George in the attacks before holding a press conference opposite the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York, Thursday, May 8, 2014. The families oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed on the memorial plaza level. The families say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains in the museum basement that flooded during Superstorm Sandy.The museum opens to the public May 21. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Rosemary Cain, left, and Sally Regenhard, whose firefighter sons were killed in the World Trade Center attacks, hold signs with their sons' photos during a news conference with attorney Norman Siegel, right, in front of a fire station opposite the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York, Thursday, May 8, 2014. The families oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed to on the memorial plaza level. The families represented Thursday say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains in the museum basement which flooded during Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
A woman visits the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, Thursday, May 8, 2014 at the World Trade Center in New York. The woman, who declined to give her name, said that her family lost friends in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The unidentified remains of those killed in the attacks are set to be moved Saturday to a repository beneath the memorial. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
A flower has been placed next to the name of a victim of the September 11, 2001 attacks that has been engraved at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, Thursday, May 8, 2014 at the World Trade Center in New York. The unidentified remains of those killed in the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 are set to be moved Saturday to a repository beneath the memorial. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Visitors to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum peer through the windows of the museum, Thursday, May 8, 2014 at the World Trade Center in New York. The unidentified remains of those killed in the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 are set to be moved Saturday to a repository beneath the memorial and museum. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Rosemary Cain, left, and Sally Regenhard, whose firefighter sons were killed in the World Trade Center attacks, hold signs with their sons' photos during a press conference with attorney Norman Siegel, right, in front of a fire station opposite the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York, Thursday, May 8, 2014. The families oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed to on the memorial plaza level. The families represented Thursday say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains in the museum basement which flooded during Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Family members of first responders killed in the World Trade Center attacks hold a press conference with attorney Norman Siegel, center, opposite the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York, Thursday, May 8, 2014. The families oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed to on the memorial plaza level. The families represented Thursday say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains in an area that flooded during Superstorm Sandy. From left are Rosemary Cain, Sally Regenhard, Siegel, Rosaleen Tallon, and Retired New York Deputy Fire Chief Jim Riches. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Retired New York Deputy Fire Chief Jim Riches, left, whose son was killed in the World Trade Center attacks, and Rosaleen Tallon, sister of firefighter Sean Tallon, also killed on 9-11, reflect during a press conference opposite the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York, Thursday, May 8, 2014. Tallon and other 9-11 family members oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed to on the memorial plaza level. The families say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains in the museum basement which flooded during Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Fire Department of New York Chief Jim Riches, left, and Rosemary Cain, both of whose sons were killed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York, stand opposite the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York, Thursday, May 8, 2014. They represented oppose the display of their families' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed to on the memorial plaza level. The families represented Thursday say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains below ground. The families also say they won't attend the museum dedication. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
New York Fire Department Chief Jim Riches, left, and Rosemary Cain, center, parents of first responders killed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, talk to attorney Norman Siegel opposite the entrance to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum Thursday, May 8, 2014 in New York. The families oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the museum as opposed to on the memorial plaza level. The families represented Thursday say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains in an area that flooded during Superstorm Sandy. The museum is set to open to the public May 21. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Family members of first responders killed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York, including Sally Regenhard, left, and Rosemary Cain, hold pictures of their firefighter sons, both killed in the attacks, as they appeal to members of the press, Thursday, May 8, 2014. The families oppose the display of their loved ones' remains in the basement of the Sept. 11 Museum as opposed to on the memorial plaza level above ground. The families represented Thursday say they weren't consulted about the decision to put the remains inside the museum, which flooded during Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
In this Tuesday, May 6, 2014 photo, the wedge-shaped pavilion entrance to the National September 11 Museum, center, is located at the World Trade Center in New York. The unidentified remains of those killed at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 are set to be moved Saturday to a repository located at bedrock level in the same building as the museum. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
In this Tuesday, May 6, 2014 photo, people walk around one of two reflecting pools at the National September 11 Memorial in New York. The unidentified remains of those killed at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 are set to be moved Saturday, May 10, 2014 to a repository located at bedrock level below the memorial. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
In this Tuesday, May 6, 2014 photo, the entrance to the National September 11 Memorial Museum, left, is located at the World Trade Center in New York. The unidentified remains of those killed at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 are set to be moved Saturday, May 10, 2014 to a repository located at bedrock level in the same building as the museum. The unfinished transportation hub, top left, 3 World Trade Center, right, under construction, and one of the two reflecting pools, bottom, surround the museum. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
In this Tuesday, May 6, 2014 photo, One World Trade Center towers over the lower Manhattan skyline in New York. The unidentified remains of those killed at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 are set to be moved Saturday, May 10, 2014 to a repository at bedrock level below the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, located at the base of the tower. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
In this Tuesday, May 6, 2014 photo, the wedge-shaped pavilion entrance to the National September 11 Museum, center, is located at the World Trade Center in New York. The unidentified remains of those killed at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 are set to be moved Saturday, May 10, 2014 to a repository located at bedrock level in the same building as the museum. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
In this Tuesday, May 6, 2014 photo, the entrance to the National September 11 Memorial Museum, center, is located between the two reflecting pools at the World Trade Center in New York. The unidentified remains of those killed at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 are set to be moved Saturday, May 10, 2014 to a repository located at bedrock level in the same building as the museum. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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NEW YORK (AP) - Some family members of Sept. 11 victims say they will protest when the unidentified remains of those killed at the World Trade Center are returned to the site.

The family members said Thursday that the plan to house the remains in the same building as the National September 11 Memorial Museum is disrespectful.

They want the remains entombed on the adjacent Memorial Plaza.

Retired firefighter Jim Riches said Sept. 11 family members are outraged. Sally Regenhard said they dread the opening of the museum this month. Riches and Regenhard both lost firefighter sons.

City officials plan to move the remains from the medical examiner's office on Saturday.

The city says the remains will be in an area separate from the museum, though in the same building.br />
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