New Stonehenge find floors historians

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Discovery Sheds New Light On Stonehenge


There's a lot of old stuff in England, but a new discovery even surprised historians.

According to The Telegraph, scientists say they've discovered the oldest town in England ... and it dates to 8820 BC.

But what makes this discovery even more significant is that this town is just 2 miles from Stonehenge ... and the villagers there are probably those responsible for first building the first versions of the monument.

The discovery was made in what is known today as Amesbury. Scientists found animal bones and carbon dated them to get their age.

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New Stonehenge find floors historians
AMESBURY, UK - APRIL 1: The best known pre-historic monument in Europe, Stonehenge is just a few kilometres from the Canadian camp on the Salisbury Plain and the soldiers routinely marched past it. At the outbreak of WW1, most Canadian soldiers came over to England and the Salisbury Plain (in the south) area for their final training before being shipped out to Belgium and France. April 11, 2014 (Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
AMESBURY, UK - APRIL 11: Stonehenge, the 4,500 year old stone circle would have been well known to the Canadians training in the area as they would march past it on a regular basis. At the outbreak of WW1, most Canadian soldiers came over to England and the Salisbury Plain (in the south) area for their final training before being shipped out to Belgium and France. April 11, 2014 (Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 18: Stonehenge is seen on December 18, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. English Heritage unveiled the new multi-million pound visitor centre at Stonehenge - located about a mile-and-a-half (2km) from the stones - which also included grassing over the road alongside the ancient monument and closure of the existing 1960s facilities this week. Stonehenge, built between 3,000 BC and 1,600 BC, attracts around 900,000 visitors a year, with 70 percent of those from overseas. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
A general view shows the prehistoric monument of Stonehenge, a world heritage site, near Amesbury in south west England on December 11, 2013. The mysterious circle of standing stones set within earthworks, on Salisbury Plain in southwest England, is one of the most iconic ancient sites in Europe. Stonehenge's new visitor centre opens on December 18 in time for the winter solstice, hoping to provide an improved experience for the million tourists that flock annually to Britain's most famous prehistoric monument. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
A general view shows the prehistoric monument of Stonehenge, a world heritage site, near Amesbury in south west England on December 11, 2013. The mysterious circle of standing stones set within earthworks, on Salisbury Plain in southwest England, is one of the most iconic ancient sites in Europe. Stonehenge's new visitor centre opens on December 18 in time for the winter solstice, hoping to provide an improved experience for the million tourists that flock annually to Britain's most famous prehistoric monument. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
A general view shows the prehistoric monument of Stonehenge, a world heritage site, near Amesbury in south west England on December 11, 2013. The mysterious circle of standing stones set within earthworks, on Salisbury Plain in southwest England, is one of the most iconic ancient sites in Europe. Stonehenge's new visitor centre opens on December 18 in time for the winter solstice, hoping to provide an improved experience for the million tourists that flock annually to Britain's most famous prehistoric monument. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 21: A woman wearing a unicorn mask watches as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 21: People dance as a man dressed in a rag costume plays an accordion, as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 21: Rollo Maughfling, Archdruid of Stonehenge & Britain, turns to the stones as he conducts a ceremony as druids, pagans and revellers gather, hoping to see the sun rise as they take part in a winter solstice ceremony at Stonehenge on December 21, 2013 in Wiltshire, England. Despite the rain and wind, a large crowd gathered at the famous historic stone circle to celebrate the sunrise closest to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year - an event claimed to be more important in the pagan calendar than the summer solstice, because it marks the 're-birth' of the Sun for the New Year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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Stonehenge, as it looks now, wasn't built until about 2000 B-C. But this new evidence suggests people were inhabiting that area thousands of years earlier... and likely built the earlier wood versions of the stone monument.

Stonehenge is, of course, one of the most famous sites in the world. It is also now the area most continuously occupied by humans in Great Britain.

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