'Hitler album' of stolen art donated to US archive

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'Hitler album' of stolen art donated to US archive
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Poland's Culture Minister Bogdan Zdrojewski unveils the oil painting "Off to the Hunt" one of two paintings by Polish painter Julian Falat, stolen by the Nazis during World War II and recently returned from New York to be given back to the National Museum in Warsaw, Poland, Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. The painting was seized for Poland after it was offered for an auction in New York. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
Poland's Culture Minister Bogdan Zdrojewski unveils the watercolor painting "The Hunt" one of two paintings by Polish painter Julian Falat, stolen by the Nazis during World War II and recently returned from New York to be given back to the National Museum in Warsaw, Poland, on Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. The painting was seized for Poland after it was offered for an auction in New York. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
Chucha Barber, Chief Financial Officer of the of the Mary Brogan Museum, discusses the status of the painting "Christ Carrying the Cross Dragged by Rogue" by Italian Renaissance artist Girolamo Romano on Thursday September 8, 2011, in Tallahassee, Fla. U.S. authorities have ordered a Tallahassee museum to hold onto a nearly 500-year-old Italian painting of Christ carrying the Cross because it is believed to have been stolen by the Nazis from a Jewish family during World War II. The painting will now stay in the museum until at least November as the United States and Italy try to resolve questions about the painting's ownership. (AP Photo/Steve Cannon)
In this April 25, 1945 image released by the U.S. National Archives, U.S. Army personnel stand by a painting called, "Wintergarden," by French impressionist Edouard Manet, which was discovered in the vault in Merkers, Germany. Holocaust survivors and their relatives, as well as art collectors and museums, can go online beginning Monday, Oct. 18, 2010 to search a historical database of more than 20,000 art objects stolen in German-occupied France and Belgium from 1940 to 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives)
In this May 13, 1945 photo released by the U.S. National Archives, the Alfred Rosenberg Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR) files are shown in a room of the Neuschwanstein Castle in Germany, where the largest Nazi art loot cache was found by the U.S. Army when they explored tunnels under the castle. Holocaust survivors and their relatives, as well as art collectors and museums, can go online beginning Monday, Oct. 18, 2010 to search a historical database of more than 20,000 art objects stolen in German-occupied France and Belgium from 1940 to 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives)
In this April 24, 1945 photo released by the U.S. National Archives, an American soldier stands among German loot stored in a church at Elligen, Germany. Holocaust survivors and their relatives, as well as art collectors and museums, can go online beginning Monday, Oct. 18, 2010 to search a historical database of more than 20,000 art objects stolen in German-occupied France and Belgium from 1940 to 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives)
In this May 13, 1945 photo released by the U.S. National Archives, "The Graces in the Gardens of the Hesperides" by Peter Paul Rubens painting taken by the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (ERR), is shown. Holocaust survivors and their relatives, as well as art collectors and museums, can go online beginning Monday, Oct. 18, 2010 to search a historical database of more than 20,000 art objects stolen in German-occupied France and Belgium from 1940 to 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives)
In this April 12, 1945 photo released by the U.S. National Archives, U.S. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander, accompanied by Gen. Omar N. Bradley, left, and Lt. George S. Patton, Jr., inspects art treasures stolen by Germans in a salt mine in Merkers, Germany. Holocaust survivors and their relatives, as well as art collectors and museums, can go online beginning Monday, Oct. 18, 2010 to search a historical database of more than 20,000 art objects stolen in German-occupied France and Belgium from 1940 to 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives)
In this May 13, 1945 photo released by the U.S. National Archives, U.S. Army Sgt. Harold Maus of Scranton, Pa., looks over an engraving by German artist Albrecht Durer, which was found among other art treasures at a salt mine in Merkers, Germany. Holocaust survivors and their relatives, as well as art collectors and museums, can go online beginning Monday, Oct. 18, 2010 to search a historical database of more than 20,000 art objects stolen in German-occupied France and Belgium from 1940 to 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives)
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WASHINGTON (AP) - Adolf Hitler's last known album of artworks stolen by the Nazis during World War II is being donated to the National Archives to mark the anniversary of the war's end in Europe.

The leather-bound "Hitler Album" joins dozens of others recovered by the U.S. Army to identify and return stolen art. The album being turned over to the archives Thursday catalogued French collections.

The story of the Army's effort to trace and return looted art was made famous by the movie "The Monuments Men" starring George Clooney and Matt Damon.

The Monuments Men Foundation is donating the album to the archives with one of the last surviving "Monuments Men" who was part of the real recovery team.

It's not clear whether any new information can be gleaned from the album.

'Hitler Album' of Stolen Art Given to US Archive

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