Russia attempts to ban swearing in general

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Russia Bans Swearing: Another Attack On Free Speech?


Russia is reportedly banning swearing.

According to BBC, last month, the Russian parliament passed a bill banning profanity from films, music and other public displays of art or "cultural events."

And on Monday, Vladimir Putin signed off on the new law. When it goes into effect July 1, CNN reports:

– Movies with profanity won't be distributed

– Copies of books, CDs and movies containing swearing will only be sold in explicitly labeled sealed packages

– People caught swearing in public will be fined up to $70 (U.S.)

– Businesses will be fined as much as $1,400 and face months-long suspensions

– Public officials only face a $40 fine

Just what counts as profanity will be determined by a "panel of experts," and the definition of what counts as a "public display" is pretty broad.

Complex argues the law's loose language could be used to limit even broad expressions of public speech.

The Wall Street Journal reports the law is made to look like a push to clean up Russia's image and make everything more family-friendly.

But observers say in reality, it's part of the country's continued attack on freedom of speech - the new restrictions equate bloggers with mainstream media, and they face the same hefty fines.

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Russia attempts to ban swearing in general
Russia's President Vladimir Putin addresses the Federation Council in Moscow's Kremlin on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin defended Russia?s move to annex Crimea, saying that the rights of ethnic Russians have been abused by the Ukrainian government. He pointed at the example of Kosovo?s independence bid supported by the West, and said that Crimea?s secession from Ukraine repeated Ukraine?s own secession from the Soviet Union in 1991. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
Russian President Vladimir Putin, second right, Speaker of Crimean legislature Vladimir Konstantinov, second left, Crimean Premier Sergei Aksyonov, left, and Sevastopol mayor Alexei Chalyi, right, shake hands after signing a treaty for Crimea to join Russia in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia?s vital interests. (AP Photo/Sergei Ilnitsky, Pool)
Russia's President Vladimir Putin addresses the Federation Council in Moscow's Kremlin on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin defended Russia?s move to annex Crimea, saying that the rights of ethnic Russians have been abused by the Ukrainian government. He pointed at the example of Kosovo?s independence bid supported by the West, and said that Crimea?s secession from Ukraine repeated Ukraine?s own secession from the Soviet Union in 1991. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
ALTERNATIVE CROP Russian President Vladimir Putin signs a treaty for Crimea to join Russia during a signing ceremony after addressing the Federal Assembly in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia?s vital interests.(AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
Russian President Vladimir Putin, second right, shakes hands with Crimean leaders, Speaker of Crimean legislature Vladimir Konstantinov, second left, Crimean Premier Sergei Aksyonov, left, and Sevastopol mayor Alexei Chalyi, right, after signing a treaty for Crimea to join Russia in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia?s vital interests. (AP Photo/Sergei Ilnitsky, Pool)
Russian President Vladimir Putin, second right, and Crimean leaders, Speaker of Crimean legislature Vladimir Konstantinov, second left, Crimean Premier Sergei Aksyonov, left, and Sevastopol mayor Alexei Chalyi, right, sign a treaty for Crimea to join Russia in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia?s vital interests. (AP Photo/Sergei Ilnitsky, Pool)
A boy holds a Russian flag as he gathers with others at a square to watch a televised address by Russian President Vladimir Putin to the Federation Council, in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin on Tuesday fiercely defended Russia's move to annex Crimea saying Crimea's vote on Sunday to join Russia was in line with "democratic norms and international law." (AP Photo/Andrew Lubimov)
Russian President Vladimir Putin drinks water as he addresses the Federal Assembly in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. With a sweep of his pen, President Vladimir Putin added Crimea to the map of Russia on Tuesday, describing the move as correcting past injustice and a response to what he called Western encroachment upon Russia's vital interests. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
Russian President Vladimir Putin, second right, Speaker of Crimean parliament Vladimir Konstantinov, second left, Crimean Premier Sergei Aksyonov, left, and Sevastopol mayor Alexei Chalyi, right, sit during a signing ceremony for the treaty to join Crimea with Russia in the Kremlin, Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia?s vital interests. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, Speaker of Crimean legislature Vladimir Konstantinov, center, and Crimean Premier Sergei Aksyonov stand after signing a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia?s vital interests. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
Crimean Premier Sergei Aksyonov, right, receives congratulations from Chechnya's regional leader Ramzan Kadyrov, left, and State Duma Speaker Sergei Naryshkin, center, after signing a treaty for Crimea to join Russia in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia?s vital interests. (AP Photo/Sergei Ilnitsky, Pool)
Russian President Vladimir Putin enters the hall to address the Federal Assembly in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia's vital interests. (AP Photo/Sergei Ilnitsky, pool)
Russia's President Vladimir Putin addresses the Federation Council in Moscow's Kremlin on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin defended Russia?s move to annex Crimea, saying that the rights of ethnic Russians have been abused by the Ukrainian government. He pointed at the example of Kosovo?s independence bid supported by the West, and said that Crimea?s secession from Ukraine repeated Ukraine?s own secession from the Soviet Union in 1991. (AP Photo/Sergei Ilnitsky, pool)
An elderly woman holding a calendar depicting Soviet leader Josef Stalin celebrates after watching a broadcast of Russian President Vladimir Putin's speech on Crimea in Sevastopol, Crimea, Tuesday, March 18, 2014 as thousands of pro-Russian people gathered to watch the address . Fiercely defending Russia's move to annex Crimea, Putin said Russia had to respond to what he described as a western plot to take Ukraine into its influence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
People cast shadows as they wave flags as they gather at a square to watch a televised address by Russian President Vladimir Putin to the Federation Council, in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin on Tuesday fiercely defended Russia's move to annex Crimea saying Crimea's vote on Sunday to join Russia was in line with "democratic norms and international law." (AP Photo/Andrew Lubimov)
People gather at a square to watch a televised address by Russian President Vladimir Putin to the Federation Council, in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin on Tuesday fiercely defended Russia's move to annex Crimea saying Crimea's vote on Sunday to join Russia was in line with "democratic norms and international law." (AP Photo/Andrew Lubimov)
SIMFEROPOL, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Couples dance in Lenin Square on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. Crimea will seek to adopt the Russian Ruble as its official currency. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
People hold their Ukrainian national flags and a poster featuring Russian President Vladimir Putin and reading 'Stop Putin' as they demonstrate in front of the Russian Ambassy in Berlin on March 17, 2014. Crimea declared independence on March 17 and applied to join Russia while the Kremlin braced for sanctions after the flashpoint peninsula voted to leave Ukraine in a ballot that will likely fan the worst East-West tensions since the Cold War. AFP PHOTO / DPA / KAY NIETFELD +++ GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read KAY NIETFELD/AFP/Getty Images)
SIMFEROPOL, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: In this photo illustration, Ukrainian historical figures are viewed on Ukrainian bank notes on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. Crimea will seek to adopt the Russian Ruble as its official currency. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
SIMFEROPOL, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Couples dance in Lenin Square on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. Crimea will seek to adopt the Russian Ruble as its official currency. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
SIMFEROPOL, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: A woman walks by grafitti on a wall on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. Crimea will seek to adopt the Russian Ruble as its official currency. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Armed men, believed to be Russian servicemen, patrol outside an Ukrainian military base in Perevalnoye on March 17, 2014. The United States and Europe aimed sanctions directly at Vladmir Putin's inner circle Monday to punish Russia's move to annex Crimea, deepening the worst East-West rift since the Cold War. The move came hours after the Ukrainian regime voted to join Russia in a referendum the West deems illegitimate and as Crimea embarked on the next political steps to embrace Kremlin rule. AFP PHOTO/ VASILY MAXIMOV (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Armed men, believed to be Russian servicemen, patrol outside an Ukrainian military base in Perevalnoye on March 17, 2014. The United States and Europe aimed sanctions directly at Vladmir Putin's inner circle Monday to punish Russia's move to annex Crimea, deepening the worst East-West rift since the Cold War. The move came hours after the Ukrainian regime voted to join Russia in a referendum the West deems illegitimate and as Crimea embarked on the next political steps to embrace Kremlin rule. AFP PHOTO/ VASILY MAXIMOV (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Cossacks, pro-Russian activists, march to take part in a rally outside the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
A pro-Russian activist holds a flag during a rally as police forces stand guard in front of the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
PEREVEVALNE, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Armed soldiers without identifying insignia keep guard outside of a Ukrainian military base in the town of Perevevalne near the Crimean city of Simferopol on March 17, 2014 in Perevevalne, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Pro-Russian activists stage a rally as police forces stand guard in front of the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Russian activists stage a rally as police forces stand guard in front of the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Russian activists stage a rally as police forces stand guard in front of the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
PEREVEVALNE, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: A man fixes the Crimean flag near groups of armed soldiers without identifying insignia who are keep guard outside of a Ukrainian military base in the town of Perevevalne near the Crimean city of Simferopol on March 17, 2014 in Perevevalne, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
PEREVEVALNE, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Armed soldiers without identifying insignia keep guard outside of a Ukrainian military base in the town of Perevevalne near the Crimean city of Simferopol on March 17, 2014 in Perevevalne, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
PEREVEVALNE, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Armed soldiers without identifying insignia keep guard outside of a Ukrainian military base in the town of Perevevalne near the Crimean city of Simferopol on March 17, 2014 in Perevevalne, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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The question on everyone's mind: Is this really enforceable?

"It's not like the Kremlin has ever fined newspapers for reporting on a gay person ('gay propaganda'), blocked entire social media networks for protest ('extremist') information, put people in jail for dancing in a church ('hooliganism with the intent to incite religious hatred') or tried to bring 'blasphemy' back."

Oh wait, it has done all of those things.

This new law comes about a year after the country passed a similar one that fines media outlets for using "vulgarities." Back then, RT's Tim Kirby had to ask, just what exactly is this accomplishing?

Kirby is quoted as saying, "So the government is basically saying if some guy on TV guns down 20 people with blood and limbs flying, that that is totally OK for television ... unless they, God forbid, swear while doing it."

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