'Monster fish' thought to be extinct washes ashore

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'Monster Fish' Thought to Be Extinct Washes Ashore

A monster fish found along the Connecticut River may mean a species once thought to be extinct is back, FOXCT reports.
'Monster fish' thought to be extinct washes ashore
In this Oct. 8, 2010 photo, Virginia Commonwealth University graduate student Matt Balazik, gets ready to toss a 70-lb Atlantic sturgeon into the James River near Charles City, Va. Balazik is a sturgeon census taker, using electronic tracking devices to monitor the movements of the armor-plated fish. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
In this Oct. 8, 2010 photo, Virginia Commonwealth University graduate student Matt Balazik grabs an Atlantic sturgeon that he caught in the James River near Charles City, Va. Balazik is a sturgeon census taker, using electronic tracking devices to monitor the movements of the armor-plated fish. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
** ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND MAY 29-31 ** Kristen Marcell, an outreach support specialist with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, holds an Atlantic sturgeon afloat as the fish gets used to the water of the Hudson River on Wednesday, May 12, 2004, in Staatsburg, N.Y. ENCON along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released 15 Atlantic sturgeon that were captive-bred in a Pennsylvania hatchery. (AP Photo/ Dave Jennings)
In this Oct. 8, 2010 photo, Virginia Commonwealth University graduate student Matt Balazik, holds an Atlantic sturgeon that he caught in the James River near Charles City, Va. Balazik is a sturgeon census taker, using electronic tracking devices to monitor the movements of the armor-plated fish. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
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A 7-foot Atlantic Sturgeon washed up in Lyme ... why it died is still a mystery, but the biggest question is why it was 8 miles up the river from the mouth of the Long Island Sound.

Atlantic Sturgeon native to Connecticut were believed to be wiped out due to over-fishing.

Even though the D.E.E.P ( Connecticut's Department of Energy & Environmental Protection) said it was a female, at least 12 years old, carrying eggs, the sturgeon was still too young to actually lay its eggs.

If baby Atlantic Sturgeon are actually discovered in the river, that would be the sign marine scientists need to prove that that type of fish is making a comeback.

"That would be like the holy grail, finding evidence of that again," Tom Savoy, a D.E.E.P. Fisheries Biologist, said.

The D.E.E.P. believes tissue samples will help prove if the Atlantic Sturgeon found in Lyme is unique to the Connecticut River, or if it's just part of another population from a river outside the state.

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