US threatens to pull aid to Haiti over late vote

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

US threatens to pull aid to Haiti over late vote
In this March 15, 2013 photo, a bodyguard walks outside parliament, which was renovated by Chemonics International Inc., a for-profit international development company based in Washington D.C., in downtown of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. A new report, by the Center for Economic and Policy Research, on American aid to Haiti in the wake of that country's devastating earthquake finds much of the money went to U.S.-based companies and organizations while just 1 percent went directly to Haitian companies. The group has been a critic of U.S. foreign policy in the past, accusing the U.S. of a top-down approach to aid that does little to alleviate poverty in impoverished Haiti. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this March 15, 2013 photo, Haiti's national flag flies outside parliament which was renovated by Chemonics International Inc., a for-profit international development company based in Washington D.C., in downtown of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. A new report on American aid to Haiti in the wake of that country's devastating earthquake finds much of the money went to U.S.-based companies and organizations while just 1 percent went directly to Haitian companies. The obstacles blocking Haitian businesses from the contracts are many: they're often not competitive because they may not be able to get the financing they need from local banks, and smaller firms also lack the resources to prepare time-consuming applications and pay for the lobbyists and lawyers needed to win contracts. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
Men pull nets with their catch from the sea at Wharf Jeremie, Citie Soleil, Port-au-Prince, on April 23, 2014. The fish will be sold at market. AFP PHOTO/Hector RETAMAL (Photo credit should read HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)
In this Tuesday, March 25, 2014 photo, students hold out their plates as the school cook ladles out a bulgur wheat and bean dish at a public school in Bombardopolis, Haiti. Drought is hitting one of the hungriest, most desolate parts of the most impoverished nation in the hemisphere and it has alarmed international aid organizations such the U.N.World Food Program, which sent workers this week to pass out bulgur wheat, cooking oil and salt. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Monday, March 24, 2014 photo, farmer Sylgramiz Delivra, 60, takes a break from gathering cassava stem cuttings that she will use to plant on her land, in Bombardopolis, northwestern Haiti. Drought is hitting this region, alarming international aid organizations such as the U.N. World Food Program. The agency said it has given food to 164,000 people in the region so far, as well as 6,000 seed kits for farmers. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
A protester burns tires on the street during a protest against President Michel Martelly's government in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Tuesday April 15, 2014. Those demonstrating called for the resignation of Martelly.( AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
A protester throws gasoline to help ignite tires during a protest against President Michel Martelly's government in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Tuesday April 15, 2014. Those demonstrating called for the resignation of Martelly. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
A protester puts his leg in a fire while perform a voodoo ceremony before the start of anti-government protest in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Tuesday April 15, 2014. The protesters called for the resignation of President Michel Martelly. ( AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
Demonstrators chant anti-government slogans during rally to mark the tenth anniversary of the second ouster of former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Thursday Feb. 27, 2014. The protesters denounced what they described as widespread corruption in the government of President Michel Martelly and even called for his resignation. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 9, 2014 photo, Christian pilgrims gather on a mountain in the village of Bois-Neuf, Haiti. Organized over the weekend by Our Lady of Fatima Bible Center, the three day summit was among the largest of its kind in the Caribbean nation in recent years. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
US Secretary of State John Kerry speaks while posing for photos with Haitian President Michel Martelly (L) ahead of a bilateral meeting at the State Department on February 5, 2014 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US Secretary of State John Kerry poses for photos with Haitian President Michel Martelly (L) ahead of a bilateral meeting at the State Department on February 5, 2014 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) -- The U.S. government has warned Haiti that it risks losing aid if it doesn't hold elections that are more than two years overdue.

The U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince said Thursday that none of the money set aside for the Haitian government by the State Appropriations Act will be available until the U.S. State Department certifies Haiti is "taking steps" to hold the legislative and local votes.

The money at stake is about $300 million that the U.S. Congress allocated for Haiti for fiscal year 2014. The money is earmarked for Haiti's coast guard, health ministry and other projects.

Haitian officials are under pressure to organize the elections for this year. The executive branch and Chamber of Deputies signed an electoral law this month but the Senate has yet to approve.

Read Full Story

People are Reading