TSA settles with mom who objected to X-raying breast milk

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
TSA Settles With Mom Who Objected To X-Raying Breast Milk

A California mother reached a settlement Wednesday after suing the Transportation Security Administration.
TSA settles with mom who objected to X-raying breast milk
A poster announcing the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) new Precheck program is seen outside the PreCheck enrollment office, at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on February 20, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. The TSA recently launched the PreCheck program that allows those enrolled in a trusted traveler network to enter about 100 US airports through a special security lane where they dont have to take off shoes, belts and jackets or remove laptops, liquids or gels. AFP PHOTO / ROBYN BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
A combination of images shows an airport staff member (L) demonstrating a full body scan at Manchester Airport in Manchester, north-west England, and a computer screen showing the results of a full body scan (R) on October 13, 2009. The image on the right is not from a scan of the man pictured left. The scanner works by bouncing x-rays off an individuals skin to produce an outline of the person's body which is then used to detect concealed, potentially dangerous objects. The image is then transmitted to a remote security officer who has no visual or verbal contact with the area where the machine is located. AFP PHOTO/PAUL ELLIS (Photo credit should read PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
PORTLAND, OR - MARCH 19: A sign informs elderly travelers they can now leave their shoes and a light jacket on when passing through airport security at Portland International Airport (PDX) March 19, 2012 in Portland, Oregon. The TSA has modified screening procedures for passengers 75 and older and was implemented at four airports nationwide as a part of a pilot program. (Photo by Natalie Behring/Getty Images)
PORTLAND, OR - MARCH 19: A sign informs elderly travelers they can now leave their shoes and a light jacket on when passing through airport security at Portland International Airport (PDX) March 19, 2012 in Portland, Oregon. The TSA has modified screening procedures for passengers 75 and older and was implemented at four airports nationwide as a part of a pilot program. (Photo by Natalie Behring/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES - NOVEMBER 22: Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa goes through an Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) full-body scanner at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on November 22, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. The mayor was demonstrating his support of the new scanners being installed in each terminal at LAX. Increasing use of the scanner at airports by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is being met with outrage by many US travelers and passengers who refuse an X-ray scan are required to undergo an enhanced pat down by TSA agents. The TSA is bracing for heavy traffic before Thanksgiving, as two separate internet campaigns are promoting a 'National Opt-Out Day' protest during which travelers are urged to refuse the new body scanners because of concerns over privacy and possible exposure to radiation. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - OCTOBER 22: A TSA officer demonstrates what the images form the Advanced Imaging Technology unit look like at John F. Kennedy International Airport's Terminal 8 passenger security checkpoint on October 22, 2010 in the Queens borough of New York City. The new backscatter X-ray full-body scanners, which are optional, can see through clothing and will screen passengers for metallic and non-metallic threats including explosives. (Photo by Michael Nagle/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


Stacey Armato says agents gave her a hard time when she asked that her breast milk not be X-rayed at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport in 2010. ABC says, "She pleaded for an alternate way to screen it."

Armato says while screeners were trying to figure out what to do, they put her in this glass room for nearly 40 minutes.

Armato says the experience was humiliating and made her feel like an animal in a cage. Before being confined, she showed a print-out of the TSA rules to a screener, and this is what happened:

"He read them and it says breast milk is a medical liquid. It is to be alternately screened. And he just didn't want to accept it."

Armato says she takes care of her body, and didn't want the X-ray radiation to negatively affect her milk.

KABC spoke to the mother: "I put a lot of time into eating organic, drinking lots of water, staying in shape. Why would I then send my milk through the X-ray?"

Armato's lawyer filed a federal lawsuit against the TSA. Armato says it was the only way to publicize the incident. KCBS says, "Suing the U.S. government is the only way for us to have been able to promote any kind of change. We had to file a lawsuit in order to hold their feet to the fire."

The TSA offered Armato a $75,000 settlement and promises to re-train screeners. Armato says the settlement will go toward attorney's fees and to a non-profit that provides support for breastfeeding moms.
Read Full Story

People are Reading