'Antiques Roadshow': Woman can't believe heirloom's value

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'Antiques Roadshow': Woman Can't Believe Heirloom's Value

On "Antiques Roadshow," a woman brought in an oil painting that had been in her family since the 1920s.
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'Antiques Roadshow': Woman can't believe heirloom's value
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This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows a man named Joe holding a Max Brother prop duck during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season. (AP Photo/PBS)
This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows Ted Trotta, of Trotta-Bono, Ltd., right, looking at Lisa as she reacts about information about her Spontoon Tomahawk Pipe during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season.(AP Photo/PBS)
In this Saturday, July 23, 2011 photo, Asian art expert and veteran "Antiques Roadshow." appraiser Lark Mason poses with a collection of Chinese rhinoceros horned cups in Tulsa, Okla. PBS says the collection was judged by Mason to be worth $1 million to $1.5 million, the most valuable item brought in for appraisal in the history of "Antiques Roadshow," which will air its 16th season next year. (AP Photo/WGBH)
A fry glass teapot is one of the many treasures brought to the "Antiques Roadshow" event in Los Angeles, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2005. The Antiques Roadshow television series is a result of a summer tour of the United States where experts appraise the prized items people bring for evaluation. (AP Photo/Kim D. Johnson)
Hiromasa Iwasaki looks over Mrs. MacArthur's salt and pepper shaker collection, consisting of over 50 pieces, on display inside the MacArthur Memorial museum as filming takes place for an "Antiques Roadshow" style show at museum, Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2004, in Norfolk, Va. The show called "Kaiun Nandemo Kanteidan" has an audience of 20 million, according to Hiroyuki Hamada, the Old Dominion University professor who helped bring the show here. On Sept. 28, that audience will see a two-hour special on the treasury of Japanese artifacts given to Gen. Douglas MacArthur and his wife, Jean. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, L. Todd Spencer)
Marcelyn, left, and daughter, Stephanie, right, of Monte Sereno, Calif., react to the news when announced that their "Norton Sound Alaska hunting helmet" is appraised to be worth between $65,000 and $75,000, during taping for the PBS-TV show called, "Chubb's Antiques Roadshow - Discovering America's Hidden Treasures," in San Francisco, Saturday, Aug. 9, 1997. The mask, made circa 1800, was picked up by mother and daughter at a flea market. (AP Photo/Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Darryl Bush)
Thousands of people wait in line to have their treasured possessions appraised by a team of experts during the final stop of the popular PBS television program, Chubb's Antiques Roadshow, Saturday, Aug. 21, 1999, at the Rhode Island Convention Center in Providence, R.I. (AP Photo/Susan E. Bouchard)
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It was by Leon Gaspard, and the last time the woman had it appraised was in the 1960s, she assumed it was worth about the same today -- $10,000. But she was in for a shock when she found out it was worth more than seven times that at $75,000.

"What? Seriously? Oh my gosh... now, that is a surprise. That is a wonderful surprise!"

Obviously, she was pleased to find out the oil painting was worth much more than she thought. Gaspard was a Russian-born painter who had a love of foreign cultures and a desire to document them artistically -- and because of his work, he became well known and financially successful.

But it turns out, that painting is on the cheaper end for a Gaspard -- in the last 10 years, his paintings have sold for as much as $2 million!

For those who can't afford the original artwork, there is a cheaper alternative -- posters and reproductions of the Gaspard's work are for sale online.
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