San Francisco Workers Say Hi With Post-it Window Displays

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Luigi Congedo/Twitter
Ah, bored office workers. You never can tell what they'll get up to: passive aggressive protests, office socializing, or entirely too much coffee.

In San Francisco, a high tech mecca, a growing number have gone the creative route. Cube dwellers with access to windows have combined art and communications in a decidedly old school way, via Post-it notes, as the blog SFist was first to notice last week.

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Rather than writing tiny missives, workers use the self-adhesive sheets as a painter would use a palette and brush or a graffiti artist, a spray can. The outward-facing glass becomes the canvas and, suddenly, they communicate with anonymous people across streets or fashion commentary for the benefit of office mates.

Sometimes there is a message for people in another building at about the same height. A new blog called #SFPOSTIT, the hashtag being used on Twitter to highlight images of examples, has called it San Francisco's newest social media platform.

People in the bareMinerals cosmetics office started with "hi," according to Twitter user Aly, and then clearly moved to more ambitious projects.

Source: Aly/Twitter

One Instagram user created his own version of the Batman logo and then moved on from there.

Source: vibolp/Instagram

Sometimes the communications become interactive, such as this inter-building game of hangman, according to a Twitter user.

Source: tmanos/Twitter

To some degree, all these people are amateurs. Post-it note art is not a new phenomenon. The manufacturer, 3M, even has software to help people design murals. Of course, an office could run through the pads of sticky paper fast enough that way to attract attention of the wrong kind.

According to the SFGate blog, some of the messages include "we r hungover" and "hire us" -- two messages that, at work, might have great affinity if the boss strolls by.

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