Volcano spews six mile ash cloud over Ecuador

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Volcano spews six mile ash cloud over Ecuador
The Tungurahua volcano spews a column of ash as seen from Ambato, Ecuador, Friday, April 4, 2014. The volcano spewed a 6-mile (10-kilometer) column of ash after a powerful five-minute explosion that shot pyroclastic material onto its northern and northwestern flanks. (AP Photo)
In this image made with a slow shutter speed, lava flows down the Tungurahua volcano, as seen from Cotalo, Ecuador, in the early hours of Monday, Dec. 17, 2012. The country's National Geophysics Institute says that a constant plume of gas and ash is rising about half a mile (1 kilometer) above the crater, with ash falling on nearby communities. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
Ash and steam billow from the Tungurahua volcano, seen from Huambalo, Ecuador, as the sun rises early Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
A view of the Tungurahua volcano as it erupts as seen from Cotalo, Ecuador, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011. Ecuador's Geophysical Institute said the volcano's increased activity that began Sunday, is billowing columns of ash, sending superheated clouds of gas down the slopes and cascading hot rocks from the summit. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
A plume of smoke comes out the Tungurahua volcano after an eruption as seen from Cotalo, Ecuador, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011. Ecuador's Geophysical Institute said the volcano's increased activity that began Sunday, is billowing columns of ash, sending superheated clouds of gas down the slopes and cascading hot rocks from the summit. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
A column of smoke and ashes comes out from the Tungurahua volcano in Pelileo, Ecuador, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010. No casualties were reported. (AP Photo/Patricio Realpe)
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QUITO, Ecuador (AP) - Ecuador's Tungurahua volcano has spewed a 6-mile (10-kilometer) column of ash after a powerful, five-minute explosion that shot pyroclastic material onto its northern and northwestern flanks.

Ecuador's geophysics institute said Friday's blast occurred at 6:10 p.m. local time and was followed by a second, four-minute explosion and five lesser tremors.

The 16,480-foot (5,023-meter) volcano, nearly 90 miles (140 kilometers) south of Quito, revived on Feb. 1, with eruptions that affected a third of Ecuador's provinces and temporarily closed a regional airport.

Tungurahua has been erupting sporadically since 1999. In 2006, a pyroclastic cloud killed four people and left two missing.
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