Retirement vs. College Saving: 3 Reasons to Put Yourself First

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Prioritizing savings can be hard when you face multiple demands on your money. For those with kids, deciding whether to save for retirement or for your children's college education can be challenging, but there are good reasons to pick your own retirement first.

In the following video, Dan Caplinger, The Motley Fool's director of investment planning, looks at three reasons why saving for retirement first generally makes sense. First, Dan notes that because retirement savings aren't treated as parental assets for financial aid purposes, your child can often get more aid if you put money into retirement accounts. Second, Dan points out that while there are many ways to finance a college education, running out of money in retirement leaves you with few options other than seeking help from family members. Lastly, Dan observes that many people can get rewards for saving for retirement, whether it's through the Saver's Tax Credit or a matching contribution for their 401(k) fund. In the end, it's important to prioritize well, but ideally, you should try to save enough to meet all your financial obligations.

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The article Retirement vs. College Saving: 3 Reasons to Put Yourself First originally appeared on

Dan Caplinger and The Motley Fool have no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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