Winter storm socks the South with snow, ice

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

Winter storm socks the South with snow, ice
In this photo taken with a fisheye lens over the city's perimeter highway known as "Spaghetti Junction," the ice-covered interstate system shows the remnants of a winter snow storm that slammed the city with over 2 inches of snow that turned highways into parking lots when motorists abandoned their vehicles creating massive traffic jams lasting through, Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. While such amounts of accumulation barely quality as a storm in the north, it was enough to paralyze the Deep South. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
In this view looking south toward downtown Atlanta, the ice-covered interstate system is empty after a winter snow storm slammed the city with over 2 inches of snow that turned highways into parking lots when motorists abandoned their vehicles creating massive traffic jams lasting through Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. While such amounts of accumulation barely quality as a storm in the north, it was enough to paralyze the Deep South. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
In this aerial photo, abandoned cars at I-75 headed northbound near the Chattahoochee River overpass are piled up in the median of the ice-covered interstate after a winter snow storm , Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said early Wednesday that the National Guard was sending military Humvees onto Atlanta's snarled freeway system in an attempt to move stranded school buses and get food and water to people. Georgia State Patrol troopers headed to schools where children were hunkered down early Wednesday after spending the night there, and transportation crews continued to treat roads and bring gas to motorists, Deal said. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
In this view looking at I-75 north at Moors Mill Rd., motorists get out of their vehicles to chat near abandoned cars along the ice-covered interstate after a winter snow storm slammed the city with over 2 inches of snow that turned highways into parking lots creating massive traffic jams lasting through Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. While such amounts of accumulation barely quality as a storm in the north, it was enough to paralyze the Deep South. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
Some secondary streets are still covered with ice two days after a winter snow storm slammed into the South snarling traffic and disrupting services, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
Two days after a winter snow storm slammed into the South snarling traffic and disrupting services, a damaged truck pointed against traffic, awaits a tow on Interstate 75/85 south of downtown Atlanta, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Many motorists abandoned their vehicles and proceeded on foot when roads iced over. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
In this view looking at Cobb Parkway at I-285, abandoned cars are piled up on the median of the ice-covered road after a winter snow storm slammed the city with over 2 inches of snow that turned highways into parking lots creating massive traffic jams lasting through Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. While such amounts of accumulation barely quality as a storm in the north, it was enough to paralyze the Deep South. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
In this aerial photo, traffic is snarled along the I-285 perimeter north of the metro area after a winter snow storm, Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said early Wednesday that the National Guard was sending military Humvees onto Atlanta's snarled freeway system in an attempt to move stranded school buses and get food and water to people. Georgia State Patrol troopers headed to schools where children were hunkered down early Wednesday after spending the night there, and transportation crews continued to treat roads and bring gas to motorists, Deal said. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
Heliodoro Martinez, left, is helped back to his car by Jamie Garcia after abandoning it overnight when it slid off the road due to winter weather, pictured Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Norcross, Ga. (AP Photo/John Amis)
A truck blocks all east-bound lanes of Interstate 285 in Sandy Spring, Ga. after htting an icet patch of road. Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. Some interstates remained clogged by jackknifed 18-wheelers Wednesday afternoon, more than 24 hours after snow began falling on the city. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
ATLANTA, GA - JANUARY 29: An abandoned car sits along an I-75 South exit ramp during the winter storm January 29, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. Drivers and kids on school buses were stuck in their vehicles overnight as the wintery weather and accidents snarled roads and highways thoughout the region. (Photo by Daniel Shirey/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - JANUARY 29: An abandoned Atlanta Public School bus sits in the ice on Howell Mill Road during the winter storm January 29, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. Drivers and kids on school buses were stuck in their vehicles overnight as the wintery weather and accidents snarled roads and highways thoughout the region. (Photo by Daniel Shirey/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - JANUARY 29: Cars sit along the side of along Interstate 75 in icy conditions January 29, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. Thousands of motorists were stranded, many overnight, as a winter storm dropped three inches of snow, and ice made driving hazardous. (Photo by Scott Cunninghaml/Getty Images)
@FOX6Traffic the car went up in flames but the owner was ok. http://t.co/lNNvZNvVgj
Vehicles make their way around a beer delivery truck that slid off county road 25 during a snow storm which hit the south, Tuesday Jan. 28, 2014 in Wilsonville, Ala. A winter storm that would probably be no big deal in the North all but paralyzed the Deep South on Tuesday, bringing snow, ice and teeth-chattering cold, with temperatures in the teens in some places. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager)
Truckers are informed that US highway 280 has been shut down in Childersburg, Ala. Tuesday Jan. 28, 2014. A fast-moving, unexpectedly severe winter storm blanketed much of Alabama with a treacherous layer of frozen precipitation Tuesday. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager)
Vehicles travel on US highway 280 as snow begins to make driving conditions difficult Tuesday January 28, 2014 in Chelsea, Ala. A fast-moving, unexpectedly severe winter storm blanketed much of Alabama with a treacherous layer of frozen precipitation Tuesday. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager)
RT @ProtectiveLife Hwy 280 from Protective Life http://t.co/Efop0xtNBZ
Vehicles are backed up on a snow covered US Highway 280 during a snow storm, Tuesday Jan. 28, 2014 in Chelsea, Ala. A winter storm that would probably be no big deal in the North all but paralyzed the Deep South on Tuesday, bringing snow, ice and teeth-chattering cold, with temperatures in the teens in some places. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager)
RT @jonwilliams2222 Helena http://t.co/oIvZBwcMCO
Vehicles are backed up on a snow covered US Highway 280 during a snow storm, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 in Chelsea, Ala. A fast-moving, unexpectedly severe winter storm blanketed much of Alabama with a treacherous layer of frozen precipitation Tuesday, causing multiple wrecks, stranding hundreds of children in schools and coating palm trees with ice at the beach. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager)
Vehicles are backed up on a snow covered US Highway 280 during a snow storm, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 in Chelsea, Ala. A fast-moving, unexpectedly severe winter storm blanketed much of Alabama with a treacherous layer of frozen precipitation Tuesday, causing multiple wrecks, stranding hundreds of children in schools and coating palm trees with ice at the beach. (AP Photo/Hal Yeager)
January 28, 2014 Atlanta: Traffic inches along the Connector as snow blankets the At;anta on Tuesday afternoon Jan. 28, 2014, as seen from the Pryor Street overpass. Interstates were clogged as commuters ended their workday early. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution,Ben Gray)
A City of Jackson employee places road barriers up while traffic drives around them near downtown Jackson, Miss., Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. An arctic blast spread across Mississippi with below freezing temperatures and treacherous driving conditions. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Traffic creeps along Interstate 55 in north Jackson, Miss., Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, as ice and snow flurries cause difficult driving conditions. A severe winter storm is expected to hit the state, bringing ice and snow to the Gulf Coast. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
A cyclist tries rides without his hands in north Jackson, Miss., Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. An arctic blast spread across Mississippi with below freezing temperatures and treacherous driving conditions. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Traffic moves slowly as snow begins to accumulate on I-65 on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Clanton, Ala. A rare storm left a slippery layer of ice and snow across a region unaccustomed to dealing with the wintry threat. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)
A truck slides as he tries to avoid another wrecked truck as snow begins to accumulate on I-65 several road closures in Alabama on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Clanton, Ala. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)
A truck slides as he tries to avoid another wrecked truck as snow begins to accumulate on I-65 several road closures in Alabama on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Clanton, Ala. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)
A truck slides off the road as it tries to avoid another wrecked truck as snow begins to accumulate on Interstate 65 near Clanton, Ala., Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. The southern half of Alabama shut down Tuesday because of a rare storm that left a slippery layer of ice and snow across a region unaccustomed to dealing with the wintry threat. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)
Traffic backs up as a wrecker pulls a car out of a ditch on I-65 during an unual snow Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Clanton, Ala. A rare storm left a slippery layer of ice and snow across a region unaccustomed to dealing with the wintry threat. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)
The snow covered statue of late Georgia Governor and U.S. Sen.Richard B. Russell points the direction for a pedestrian as she makes her way past the state capitol while snow begins to accumulate Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)
A water fountain is covered in ice as a pedestrian walks up 14th street, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, in Atlanta. Georgia's coldest temperatures of the week are expected early Friday morning, with lows in single-digits in much of the state. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A pedestrian makes her way along a downtown sidewalk with traffic snarling behind her as people try to beat the snow accumulating on the streets Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Atlanta. Georgians stocked up on ice-melting chemicals, school systems closed, and road crews prepared to clear snow and ice from highways as a winter storm took aim. (AP Photo/John Amis)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


By RAY HENRY and RUSS BYNUM

ATLANTA (AP) - The mad rush began at the first sight of snow: Across the Atlanta area, schools let out early and commuters left for home after lunch, instantly creating gridlock so severe that security guards and doormen took to the streets to direct cars amid a cacophony of blaring horns.

Georgia State University student Alex Tracy looked on with amusement.

"My family is from up north and we're used to driving in the snow and stuff, and seeing everyone freak out, sliding and stuff, it's pretty funny," Tracy said.

A winter storm that would probably be no big deal in the North all but paralyzed the Deep South on Tuesday, bringing snow, ice and teeth-chattering cold, with temperatures in the teens in some places.

Many folks across the region don't know how to drive in snow, and many cities don't have big fleets of salt trucks or snowplows, and it showed. Hundreds of wrecks happened from Georgia to Texas. Two people died in an accident in Alabama.

"As I drove, I prayed the whole way," said Jane Young, an 80-year-old pastor's wife who was traveling in Austin, Texas, before dawn on her way to volunteer at a polling station when sleet began falling. "I said, 'Lord, put your hands on mine and guide me. This is your car now.'"

As many as 50 million people across the region could be affected by the time the snow stops on Wednesday. Up to 4 inches of snow fell in central Louisiana, and about 3 inches was forecast for parts of Georgia. Up to 10 inches was expected in the Greenville, N.C., area and along the state's Outer Banks.

On the Gulf Shores beaches in Alabama, icicles hung from palm trees. Hundreds of students in the northeastern part of the state faced spending the night in gyms or classrooms because the roads were too icy. Four people were killed in a Mississippi mobile home fire blamed on a space heater.

The governors of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi declared states of emergency.

New Orleans' merry Bourbon Street in the French Quarter was oddly quiet as brass bands and other street performers stayed indoors.

Lee and Virginia Holt of Wayne, Pa., walked into Cafe du Monde - a New Orleans landmark known for its beignets and cafe au lait - after finding the National World War II Museum closed because of the weather.

"We understand they don't have the equipment to prepare the roads," she said. Her husband added: "Nor the experience."

Snow covered Atlanta's statues of civil rights heroes, and snowplows that rarely leave the garage rolled out onto the city's streets.

Mary McEneaney, who is in fundraising at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, left work around 1:30 p.m. and headed home, a five-mile drive that generally takes about 20 minutes. On Tuesday, it took three hours, including 40 minutes just to cover roughly three blocks.

"I had to stop and go to the bathroom" at a hotel, she said. "At that rate I knew I wasn't going to make it until I got home."

At a hardware store in the Georgia town of Cumming, snow shovels were in short supply, but manager Tom Maron said feed scoops - often used in barns - could be substituted.

Charleston, S.C.; Savannah, Ga.; Pensacola, Fla.; Virginia Beach, Va.; and New Orleans - popular warm-weather tourist destinations where visitors can usually golf and play tennis in shirt sleeves or light jackets this time of year - were expecting ice and snow on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Meanwhile, in the Midwest, dangerous cold continued to grip the region even as the storm moved south. Many schools closed for the second straight day. In Minnesota, forecasters said wind chills could reach 35 to 50 degrees below zero.

At Oak Mountain Intermediate School near Birmingham, Ala., principal Pat LeQuier said about 230 of the school's fourth- and fifth-graders and nearly all teachers and staff members were still on campus by late afternoon, and some could wind up spending the night since parents were stuck in traffic or at work.

"We have a toasty building, a fully stocked kitchen, and I'm not worried," LeQuier said.

In Savannah, residents braced for a winter whiplash, barely 24 hours after the coastal city hit a T-shirt-friendly 73 degrees. Less than a quarter-inch of ice and up to an inch of snow were possible in a city that has seen very little snow on its manicured squares in the past 25 years.

Savannah had 3.6 inches of snow in December 1989, a dusting of 0.2 inches in February 1996 and 0.9 inches in February 2010.

Phil Sellers leads walking tours rain or shine of Savannah's oak-shaded squares, bronze Civil War monuments and Victorian neighborhoods. But come ice and snow, he will stay inside.

"Usually what happens in Savannah is everything stops immediately when you first see a snowflake," he said. "Everyone's jaw drops."

At grocery store across the region, shoppers mostly cleaned out shelves of bottled water, bread, milk and boxed fire logs.

Nationwide, more than 3,200 airline flights were canceled.

In Georgia's Okefenokee Swamp, the alligators burrowed into the mud to keep warm.

"Their metabolism slows down so they're able to not breathe as often, so they don't have to come to the surface as often," said Susan Heisey, a supervisory ranger at the national wildlife refuge. "These alligators have been on this earth a long time and they've made it through."


Winter storm socks the South with snow, ice
Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, before the Senate Banking Committee to deliver the semiannual Monetary Policy Report to Congress. Yellen noted that some recent economic data have pointed to weaker-than-expected gains in consumer spending and job growth. She said the Fed will be watching to see whether the slowdown proves only a temporary blip caused by severe winter weather. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Workers clear newly-fallen snow from a street, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, in Trenton, N.J., after a quick-moving storm brought several inches of snow as well as rare "thundersnow" to parts of the winter-weary East Coast. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Workers take a lunch break from shoveling snow near the Statehouse in Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, in Trenton, N.J., after a quick-moving storm brought several inches of snow as well as rare "thundersnow" to parts of the winter-weary East Coast. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 13: Kirby, a wheaten terrier, is walked by its owner during a snow storm February 13, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York. In what is turning out to be one of the snowiest winter's in recent memory for New York City and ouch of the East Coast, Thursday's weather is expected to bring a wintery mix of sleet and snow with total accumulation of 6 to 8 inches of snow before ending early Friday morning. (Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 13: A worker with the New York City Parks and Recreation Department uses a snowblower along the Promenade during a snow storm February 13, 2013 in the Brooklyn borough of New York. In what is turning out to be one of the snowiest winter's in recent memory for New York City and ouch of the East Coast, Thursday's weather is expected to bring a wintery mix of sleet and snow with total accumulation of 6 to 8 inches of snow before ending early Friday morning. (Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)
A worker shovels snow into a front loader on the plaza in front of the Barclays Center during a major snowstorm that dumped a foot of snow on the city, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
The sun illuminates windblown snow as a man walks under elevated train tracks, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014, in Philadelphia. A winter storm stretched from Kentucky to New England and hit hardest along the heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor between Philadelphia and Boston. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Young people uses a mattress as a sled to slide down the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014, in Philadelphia. A winter storm stretched from Kentucky to New England and hit hardest along the heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor between Philadelphia and Boston. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Workers clear snow Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014, in Trenton, N.J., after a swirling storm Tuesday left frigid temperatures and more than a foot of snow in some areas. The storm clobbered the mid-Atlantic and the urban Northeast, grounding thousands of flights, closing government offices in the nation's capital and giving students another day off from school. The storm stretched 1,000 miles between Kentucky and Massachusetts. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
A man shovels snow off his car in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. A winter storm stretched from Kentucky to New England and hit hardest along the heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor between Philadelphia and Boston. Snow began falling at midmorning Tuesday in Philadelphia and dumped as much as 14 inches by Wednesday morning, with New York seeing almost as much. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Travelers walk in the economic parking lot at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014. The storm hitting the Northeast U.S. is forcing dozens of airports to delay and cancel flights. Sunday night temperatures will drastically drop to about minus 20 degrees. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Jan Solie, an over the road semi-truck driver from Augusta, Wis., checks her stuck truck in Grand Forks, ND, during a blizzard Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, that made travel treacherous around the region and prompted the shutdown of roads, public schools and even universities. (AP Photo/Jackie Lorentz)
A man walks during a winter snowstorm Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, in Philadelphia. A swirling storm with the potential for more than a foot of snow clobbered the mid-Atlantic and the urban Northeast on Tuesday, grounding thousands of flights, closing government offices in the nation's capital and making a mess of the evening commute. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
A woman stands at the entrance of a building during a winter snowstorm Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, in Philadelphia. A storm is sweeping across the Mid-Atlantic and New England. The National Weather Service said the storm could bring 8 to 12 inches of snow to Philadelphia and New York City, and more than a foot in Boston. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Tourists seeks shelter from the falling snow by walking close to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014. A storm front is expected to leave five to eight inches of snow in it's wake as it passes through the Nations's Capitol. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)
Cecy Wang, right, clears snow off her car as Samuel Scott, left, shovels a sidewalk Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014, in St. Louis. As Missourians muddled through another frigid day Tuesday, the worst cold snap in nearly two decades was about to come to an end but many roads remained partly snow-covered two days after a winter storm dumped several inches of snow. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
A man runs back to his truck in blowing and falling snow as a strong winter storm moves through the Midwest Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, in Springfield, Ill. Temperatures not seen in years are likely to set records in the coming days across the Midwest, Northeast and South, creating dangerous travel conditions and prompting church and school closures. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
A man wears a face mask and heavy clothes while walking through downtown Springfield, Ill., in blowing and falling snow as a strong winter storm moves through the Midwest Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014. Temperatures not seen in years are likely to set records in the coming days across the Midwest, Northeast and South, creating dangerous travel conditions and prompting church and school closures. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
US Postal Service letter carrier Danny Kim clears snow and ice as he climbs on the hood of his mail delivery truck in the parking lot at the U.S. Post Office in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Jan. 3, 2014. Kim said that despite the storm resulting in many closing of local school systems, he and his colleagues were working on an unchanged schedule. A winter storm that swept across the Midwest this week blew through the Northeast and its biggest cities on Friday, producing more than a foot of snow in spots, giving rise to wind gusts that threatened trees and power lines, and leaving bone-chilling cold in its wake. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
A jogger runs on the National Mall, with the Washington Monument in the background, Friday, Jan. 3, 2014, in Washington. After a storm blew through the Washington region overnight, roads are being cleared and many schools systems are closed. The federal government and the District of Columbia government will be open Friday, but workers have the option to take leave or telework. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
An Amtrak train kicks up fresh snow as it speeds southbound on Friday, Jan. 3, 2014, in Schodack Landing, N.Y.
A couple walk with a suitcase on a snow covered parking lot at Newark Liberty International Airport , Friday, Jan. 3, 2014, in Newark, N.J. Airlines cancelled flights early Friday because of the storm conditions. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie declared state of emergency Thursday, urging residents to stay home. Schools were closed as temperatures reached below 20 degrees with wind-chills below zero in some places. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
Pedestrians brave wind and snow as they cross Fifth Avenue, Friday, Jan. 3, 2014, in New York. New York City public schools were closed Friday after up to 7 inches of snow fell by morning in the first snowstorm of the winter. A winter storm slammed into the U.S. Northeast with howling winds and frigid cold, dumping nearly 2 feet (60 centimeters) of snow in some parts and whipping up blizzard-like conditions Friday. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Heavy surf breaks over the seawall after a winter storm, Friday, Jan. 3, 2014, in Hampton, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Jack Keefe surfs in the Atlantic Ocean on the coast of Hampton, N.H., after a winter storm kicked up the surf, Friday, Jan. 3, 2014. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Cindy Roche of Salisbury, Mass., braces herself on a fence after taking pictures of rough surf at Salisbury Beach Friday, Jan. 3, 2014 in the wake of a winter storm which dumped up 2 feet of snow in some areas north of Boston. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
John Breese is bundled against a cold wind as he tows a car that got stuck in the snow after skidding off the road in Yardley, Pa., Friday, Jan. 3, 2014 .The first winter storm of 2014 scattered up to 8 inches in some parts of Pennsylvania. Forecasters warned that gusts of up to 30 mph Friday could bring wind chills to minus 25 degrees, cold enough to cause frostbite in about 30 minutes or less. The National Weather Service said people should dress warmly to avoid hypothermia and cover all exposed skin. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Snowmen sit in front of the Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 3, 2014, after a winter snow storm in the nation's capital. After a storm blew through the Washington region overnight, roads are being cleared and many schools systems are closed. The federal government and the District of Columbia government will be open Friday, but workers have the option to take leave or telework. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
A pedestrian walks in the snow on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, in Albany, N.Y. Up to 5 inches of snow had fallen in eastern New York early Thursday, but the National Weather Service said some areas from Buffalo to Albany could get up to 12 inches by the time the storm subsides on Friday. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
A girls gets off her school bus on a snow-covered road during a winter storm on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, in Zelienople, Pa. The National Weather Service predicts 2 to 4 inches of snow to fall from the storm in the Pittsburgh area and as much as 4 to 6 inches in the areas like this north of the city. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
A pedestrian walks through the snow outside the state Capitol on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, in Albany, N.Y. Up to 5 inches of snow have fallen in eastern New York early Thursday, but the National Weather Service said some areas from Buffalo to Albany could get up to 12 inches by the time the storm subsides on Friday. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION
Read Full Story

People are Reading

The Latest from our Partners
1 - 3 of 15