nb_cid nb_clickOther -tt-nb this.style.behavior='url(#default#homepage)';this.setHomePage('http://www.aol.com/?mtmhp=acm50s247banner041514 network-banner-promo mtmhpBanner
14
AOL.com
AOL.com
AOL Mail
AOL Mail
Video
Video
AOL Favorites
Favorites
AOL.com

1971 FBI burglars reveal themselves in new book

1971 FBI Burglars Reveal Themselves In New Book

They were Snowden before Snowden, except no one ever knew who they were until now. Five of the eight burglars who ultimately helped take down J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI domestic surveillance machine have revealed themselves.

The burglars revealed themselves ahead of a new book released Tuesday detailing the daring raid in the midst of the Vietnam War era - 'The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI.'

​ The group was formed by a Philadelphia professor who grew increasingly frustrated years of Vietnam War protests had little actual impact. After months of casing an FBI satellite office in Media, Pennsylvania, the eight broke in, stuffed thousands of pages of documents into suitcases and drove getaway cars to a farmhouse.

According to WSWP, the documents revealed widespread domestic surveillance on anyone Hoover considered a threat or dissenter - from an anonymous letter to Martin Luther King, Jr. threatening to reveal his extramarital affairs to interviews of college student war protesters.

Archived articles from 1971 show one document that read: ​'It will enhance the paranoia endemic in these circles and will further serve to get the point across there is an F.B.I. agent behind every mailbox.'

The burglars sent those documents to several journalists, including former Washington Post reporter Betty Medsger - the book's author.

Despite the Nixon administration's attempts to get the documents returned, Medsger wrote the first article detailing the FBI's surveillance two weeks after the break-in.

During the mid-1970s, a Senate investigation revealed more FBI abuses and led to greater congressional oversight, though Hoover was dead by that point.

Knowing they could go to prison for years, two of the burglars - John and Bonnie Raines - even arranged for family members to take care of their three children if they were caught.

But they weren't, though the eight never met again as a group. When the statute of limitations for filing charges expired and the FBI closed the cased, Medsger writes only one of the burglars was on the FBI's final list of possible suspects.

John Raines told The New York Times that 'It looks like we're terribly reckless people. But there was absolutely no one in Washington - senators, congressmen, even the president - who dared hold J. Edgar Hoover to accountability.'

Three burglars chose to remain anonymous, despite the book's release and no risk of prosecution. The Raines say they feel a kinship toward NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

They were Snowden before Snowden, except no one ever knew who they were until now. Five of the eight burglars who ultimately helped take down J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI domestic surveillance machine have revealed themselves.


"Burglars broke into this office outside Philadelphia in 1971 and stole 1,000 secret documents - the culprits never found. 'We did it. Somebody had to do it.'" (Via NBC)


The burglars revealed themselves ahead of a new book released Tuesday detailing the daring raid in the midst of the Vietnam War era - "The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI."

​ The group was formed by a Philadelphia professor who grew increasingly frustrated years of Vietnam War protests had little actual impact. After months of casing an FBI satellite office in Media, Pennsylvania, the eight broke in, stuffed thousands of pages of documents into suitcases and drove getaway cars to a farmhouse.


"We were like, 'Oh, man! I can't believe this worked!' We knew there was going to be some gold in there somewhere." "Each of the eight of us were sorting files, and all of a sudden, you'd hear one of us. 'Oh! Oh, look! Look at this one!" (Via The New York Times)

The documents revealed widespread domestic surveillance on anyone Hoover considered a threat or dissenter - from an anonymous letter to Martin Luther King, Jr. threatening to reveal his extramarital affairs to interviews of college student war protesters. (Via WSWP)

Archived articles from 1971 show one document read, ​"It will enhance the paranoia endemic in these circles and will further serve to get the point across there is an F.B.I. agent behind every mailbox." (Via The Harvard Crimson)

The burglars sent those documents to several journalists, including former Washington Post reporter Betty Medsger - the book's author. (Via The Burglary)

Despite the Nixon administration's attempts to get the documents returned, Medsger wrote the first article detailing the FBI's surveillance two weeks after the break-in.


During the mid-1970s, a Senate investigation revealed more FBI abuses and led to greater congressional oversight, though Hoover was dead by that point. (Via NPR)

Knowing they could go to prison for years, two of the burglars - John and Bonnie Raines - even arranged for family members to take care of their three children if they were caught. (Via NBC)

But they weren't, though the eight never met again as a group. When the statute of limitations for filing charges expired and the FBI closed the cased, Medsger writes only one of the burglars was on the FBI's final list of possible suspects.


John Raines told The New York Times, ​ "It looks like we're terribly reckless people. But there was absolutely no one in Washington - senators, congressmen, even the president - who dared hold J. Edgar Hoover to accountability."

Three burglars chose to remain anonymous, despite the book's release and no risk of prosecution. The Raines say they feel a kinship toward NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

- See more at: http://www.newsy.com/videos/1971-fbi-burglars-reveal-themselves-in-new-book/#sthash.egT0DpnS.dpuf

They were Snowden before Snowden, except no one ever knew who they were until now. Five of the eight burglars who ultimately helped take down J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI domestic surveillance machine have revealed themselves.


"Burglars broke into this office outside Philadelphia in 1971 and stole 1,000 secret documents - the culprits never found. 'We did it. Somebody had to do it.'" (Via NBC)


The burglars revealed themselves ahead of a new book released Tuesday detailing the daring raid in the midst of the Vietnam War era - "The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI."


​ The group was formed by a Philadelphia professor who grew increasingly frustrated years of Vietnam War protests had little actual impact. After months of casing an FBI satellite office in Media, Pennsylvania, the eight broke in, stuffed thousands of pages of documents into suitcases and drove getaway cars to a farmhouse.


"We were like, 'Oh, man! I can't believe this worked!' We knew there was going to be some gold in there somewhere." "Each of the eight of us were sorting files, and all of a sudden, you'd hear one of us. 'Oh! Oh, look! Look at this one!" (Via The New York Times)


The documents revealed widespread domestic surveillance on anyone Hoover considered a threat or dissenter - from an anonymous letter to Martin Luther King, Jr. threatening to reveal his extramarital affairs to interviews of college student war protesters. (Via WSWP)


Archived articles from 1971 show one document read, ​"It will enhance the paranoia endemic in these circles and will further serve to get the point across there is an F.B.I. agent behind every mailbox." (Via The Harvard Crimson)


The burglars sent those documents to several journalists, including former Washington Post reporter Betty Medsger - the book's author. (Via The Burglary)


Despite the Nixon administration's attempts to get the documents returned, Medsger wrote the first article detailing the FBI's surveillance two weeks after the break-in.


During the mid-1970s, a Senate investigation revealed more FBI abuses and led to greater congressional oversight, though Hoover was dead by that point. (Via NPR)


Knowing they could go to prison for years, two of the burglars - John and Bonnie Raines - even arranged for family members to take care of their three children if they were caught. (Via NBC)


But they weren't, though the eight never met again as a group. When the statute of limitations for filing charges expired and the FBI closed the cased, Medsger writes only one of the burglars was on the FBI's final list of possible suspects.


John Raines told The New York Times, ​ "It looks like we're terribly reckless people. But there was absolutely no one in Washington - senators, congressmen, even the president - who dared hold J. Edgar Hoover to accountability."


Three burglars chose to remain anonymous, despite the book's release and no risk of prosecution. The Raines say they feel a kinship toward NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

- See more at: http://www.newsy.com/videos/1971-fbi-burglars-reveal-themselves-in-new-book/#sthash.egT0DpnS.dpuf

More From You

396 Comments
*0 / 3000 Character Maximum
Filter by:
b2ran January 08 2014 at 6:09 AM

AMEN!!!

"When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty."

"What country can preserve its liberties if its rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance?"

“The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions that I wish it to be always kept alive. It will often be exercised when wrong, but better so than not to be exercised at all.”

"A government strong enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have."

Thomas Jefferson

I know some don’t even have a clue who this man was. Educate yourself here:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/thomasjefferson

Reply Flag as Abusive +2 rate up rate down
1 reply to b2ran's comment
b2ran January 08 2014 at 6:11 AM

Computer glitch again.

This was suppose to be a reply to smartinbake below.

Reply Flag as Abusive rate up rate down
fisheadnj January 08 2014 at 4:05 AM

These people are lawbreakers, period. Hey I do not like much of what I see today but I do not hold the self rightous attitude that these folks do. They did not want to fix our society, they want to replace it with some socialist dung heap govt. Snowden is a traitor, period. For them to feel some type of kinship to him is normal, its just that birds of a feather thing.

Reply Flag as Abusive -1 rate up rate down
4 replies to fisheadnj's comment
Idiot January 08 2014 at 3:26 AM

Snowden signed who knows how many documents saying he would keep his mouth shut. Blind folded tied to the stake and shot,. Just the fact the high school drop out mishandled classified material is a prison sentence. It's Snowden hunting season and I want my tag.

Reply Flag as Abusive -3 rate up rate down
Eric January 08 2014 at 3:24 AM

I'm not surprised , What eles is new !

Reply Flag as Abusive rate up rate down
madboyz52 January 08 2014 at 3:23 AM

This ugly MFKR is making the trip for all the dog eating hookers he'll be able to do. International diplomacy is the farthest thing from this clown's agenda. A genuine role model. Kim probably thinks he has captured King Kong. Truth is he is right on the money!

Reply Flag as Abusive rate up rate down
jwilli1251 January 08 2014 at 2:38 AM

The FBI abuses are real and deserved to be "outted". Snowden is revealing no abuses not first condoned by the supreme court. Snowden is a traitor, though more of a nuisance than a threat.

Reply Flag as Abusive +2 rate up rate down
1 reply to jwilli1251's comment
jnjackman January 08 2014 at 5:58 AM

NSA could easily start abusing the data they collect. The FBI did not start out that way, but the power corrupted. I choose not to trust ANY government agency with no oversight. Imagine a group of bureaucrats with email, voicemail and financial data on political rivals. As with the FBI, who is going to stop them??

Reply Flag as Abusive +1 rate up rate down
Randy January 08 2014 at 2:04 AM

In all of this time....nothing has changed except for the worse. Obama and his IRA and NSA thugs make J. Edgar Hoover look like a Girl Scout.

Reply Flag as Abusive rate up rate down
pcfriar66 January 08 2014 at 12:40 AM

Good for them. In their case there were no National Security issues. Simply a case of the constitution being shat on by enforcement. Hoover never secured a warrant or court authorization for wiretapping, searches, ect. He ordered thousands of "black bag jobs", and believed that the end of law enforcement justified any means whatsoever, legal or illegal. He wouldn't have kniown a warrant if it walked up and slapped him in the face. He stayed in power so long because he had something bad on virtually everyone and threatened to make it public.

Reply Flag as Abusive +7 rate up rate down
strawbuild January 08 2014 at 12:07 AM

Every generation has faithful patriots that are willing to risk everything for the people. These folks did it and now Snowden has done it for us too.

Reply Flag as Abusive +5 rate up rate down
1 reply to strawbuild's comment
jaguara777 January 08 2014 at 1:29 AM

Speak for yourself. Snowden released a lot more than surveillance info. Snowden is reckless and damaged US security. He could have been a legal whistle blower, He chose to steal 1.7 MILLION DOCUMENTS!

Reply Flag as Abusive rate up rate down
LL January 07 2014 at 11:43 PM

The actual "Terribly RECKLESS ones" are in high places of our government - and why "An Armed Society Is A Polite Society", folks !

Anyone who pushes for disarmament is a fool - because only FOOLS would fall for the charade of the use of the mentally unstable as a weapon for furthering the limits on guns, .... without which, we could NEVER stand up to tyranny !!!

The mentally ill are simply pawns for political goals - for this is EXACTLY how Socialisim thrives !

Reply Flag as Abusive +4 rate up rate down
2 replies to LL's comment
jhutson534 January 08 2014 at 1:02 AM

gail are you in georgia? Jim H

Reply Flag as Abusive +2 rate up rate down
b2ran January 08 2014 at 5:12 AM

I couldn't agree with you more Gail.

"The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government."

"When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty."

"What country can preserve its liberties if its rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance?"

Those are not quotes from some traitor or the NRA. They came from one of our founding fathers, old Thomas Jefferson. He had many and a lot apply today. Like these:

"To take from one because it is thought that his own industry and that of his father’s has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who, or whose fathers, have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association—the guarantee to every one of a free exercise of his industry and the fruits acquired by it."

"A government strong enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have."

"I think myself that we have more machinery of government than is necessary, too many parasites living on the labor of the industrious."

“The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions that I wish it to be always kept alive. It will often be exercised when wrong, but better so than not to be exercised at all.”

These quotes are just as true today as they were in the late 1700s. Some are actually happening today, Of course some, will deny it because they live in La La Land, and need to be beamed somewhere by Scotty.

Reply Flag as Abusive rate up rate down
~~ 2592000

Voting...

More From Our Partners