Blocking Tesla's Selling Style Is Unconstitutional

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The electric automaker, Tesla Motors is radically changing the way cars are made and the way those cars are actually sold. It's that latter point I believe is getting as much bad press as reality show "Duck Dynasty" has seen in recent days, but is it really warranted when it comes to Tesla? I don't believe it is. Frankly, what they are doing is stealing a page out of Michael Dell's direct to consumer sales playbook and that should have states like Texas, Arizona, Maryland reconsidering letting the company sells its cars in their states. Even Ohio auto dealers are suing to stop Tesla's direct to consumer approach. However, the way we live today is quite different than even just a few years back thanks to advances in technology so auto franchises should not get special privileges to sell cars anymore, right?

Companies like Facebook and Twitter turned traditional publishing on its head in recent years yet those names have been globally embraced. Therefore Tesla may be getting a bad rap largely because the sector it is aiming to revolutionize (autos) is largely fueled by Big Oil.

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The article Blocking Tesla's Selling Style Is Unconstitutional originally appeared on

John Licata has no position in any stocks mentioned. You can follow John on Twitter @bluephoenixinc. The Motley Fool recommends Facebook, Tesla Motors, and Twitter. The Motley Fool owns shares of Facebook and Tesla Motors. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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