Lost city revealed as Folsom lake levels drop

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Lost City Revealed as Lake Levels Drop

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What do you call a marina with no water in it?

'It's almost as low as I've ever seen it,' long-time neighbor Frank Wilcox said Thursday.

The City of Folsom is calling that a critical situation.

They've already imposed restrictions on landscape watering as Folsom Lake, at one fifth it's total capacity, is on the verge of breaking a record for low water levels.

Now, citing the driest year in more than 100 years of record keeping, the County of Sacramento is asking its residents to search for ways they can lower their water use by 20 percent.

Meanwhile, people are taking advantage of the rapidly growing shoreline by the lake. As the water goes down, the metal detectors come out.

In the late 1800′s, a mining village called Mormon Island was located at the foot of what would become Folsom Lake. By design, the new lake swallowed Mormon Island when the American River was dammed.

But now, the receding water line has spit the muddy rubble of the village back out.

For amateur archaeologists, it's a rare opportunity. Especially in a time when more traditional forms of winter fun just aren't the same.

"Usually we would be up the hill, skiing or snowboarding- enjoying the snow pack. But it's just not there this year," said one woman, walking the beach with a metal detector.

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Lost city revealed as Folsom lake levels drop

As the water level goes down, metal detectors come out and curious locals search for clues from the past.

(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

WITH STORY SLUGGED: TSUNAMI INDIA LOST CITY ?, BY TIM SULLIVAN ---- Officials of Archeological Survey of India and laborers work at an excavation site in Mahabalipuram,I ndia, Sunday March 13, 2005. Several remains of ancient temples, which according to the locals are part of local folklore and legend known for generations, were unearthed in Mahabalipuram by the force of the receding tidal waves caused by the tsunami on Dec. 26, 2004. (AP Photo/M.Lakshman)
Picture here is a view of the ancient city Oplonti, located about 10 miles north of Pompeii, under the modern town of Torre Annunziata in 1979. Oplonti is unusual in that it was a strictly residential community without markets or forums. Its occupants were probably wealthy Pompeian commuters and rich Roman patricians on vacation. (AP Photo/Jim Bourdier)
MOJOKERTO, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA - 2013/08/26: Workers clean old bricks, finds from the archaeological excavations that are takiing place in the old metropolitan city of Trowulan. The Trowulan archaeological site, which covers approximately 100 square kilometres, is located in Mojokerto Regency, in the Indonesian province of East Java. The site is believed to be the remains of what was once the capital city of the Majapahit Empire, featured by 14th century poet Mpu Prapanca in his poem Nagarakretagama. The city was razed during a fight between Girindrawardhana and Kertabhumi in 1478. The Trowulan site is the only archaeological site dating to the Hindu-Buddha classical age to be found in Indonesia. Geographically, the Trowulan area was suitable for human settlement because of its flat topography and access to water. Hundreds of thousands of archaeological remnants and artefacts of the old city in the Trowulan Site were found buried underground as well as on the surface and are still being found today.. (Photo by Arief Priyono/LightRocket via Getty Images)
TURKEY - JUNE 01: Burned bricks found on the site prove that the city had indeed been destroyed by a fire in Turkey in June, 2002. (Photo by Eric VANDEVILLE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
Art technician Brian Boeddeker, who was hired to help inventory the collection belonging to the city of San Francisco and rescue treasures that have fallen into disrepair, looks at the largest piece uncovered in the San Francisco General Hospital basement in San Francisco, Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2006. The work, titled "Loosender's Lost Summer Weekend," is by artist Frederick Brayman. San Francisco owns more than 3,300 pieces of art, acquired mainly through commissions and gifts and worth an estimated $30 million. But decades of poor record-keeping and other factors have landed work by noted artists in the basement. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
Undated black-and-white file photo of American soldiers looking at artwork German Nazis had stored in a Thuringian mine. They hold a painting of impressionist painter Edouard Manet ("In the Wintergarden", 1879) standing on lorries. People looking for Nazi art loot in U.S. museums are to get a new tool when a Web site - www.nepip.org - goes on line that will help make a quick search of important public collections. A searcher for a lost work may see a clue in a thumbnail photo and a brief description on the Internet. The museum can then be asked for more information on what art experts call provenance - the object's history, including how the museum got it. (AP Photo/National Archives)
A stone Sphinx head in the likeness of Pharaoh Nechtanebis which was unearthed in Luxor, Egypt around March 16, 1949. It is one of many which lined a broad avenue connecting the Temples of the God of Amon in the Pharaonic City of Thebes. Muhammed Zakaria Goneim, chief inspector of antiquities for Upper Egypt, unseen, is responsible for this discovery. The beginnings of the avenue, bordered by ram-headed Sphinxes, was uncovered some time ago in front of the temple of Karnak. Goneim undertook to find the lost section of the avenue, which has remained hidden by a pavement for 1750 years. His workers began to dig on Jan. 16, 1949, on the second day, beneath the pavement laid when the Romans ruled Egypt, he found a headless Sphinx. On a stone pedestal beneath its body he found an inscription which he has roughly translated to read: ?l, King Nechtanebis, made this road for the god Amon in order that he might make good navigation from the temple of Luxor. Never before was such a beautiful road made.? Up to the present time, Goneim?s excavations have brought four Sphinxes to light, two headless, two with heads carved to the likeness of King Nechtanebis, who reigned at Sebennytos, on the Damietta branch of the Nile in Lower Egypt, about 400 years B.C. (AP Photo)
A newly discovered Sphinx witha lionlike body on a pedestal found in Luxor around March 16, 1949. The head was missing. It is one of many which lined a broad avenue connecting the Temples of the God of Amon in the Pharaonic City of Thebes. Muhammed Zakaria Goneim, chief inspector of antiquities for Upper Egypt, unseen, is responsible for this discovery. The beginnings of the avenue, bordered by ram-headed Sphinxes, was uncovered some time ago in front of the temple of Karnak. Goneim undertook to find the lost section of the avenue, which has remained hidden by a pavement for 1750 years. His workers began to dig on Jan. 16, 1949, on the second day, beneath the pavement laid when the Romans ruled Egypt, he found a headless Sphinx. On a stone pedestal beneath its body he found an inscription which he has roughly translated to read: ?l, King Nechtanebis, made this road for the god Amon in order that he might make good navigation from the temple of Luxor. Never before was such a beautiful road made.? Up to the present time, Goneim?s excavations have brought four Sphinxes to light, two headless, two with heads carved to the likeness of King Nechtanebis, who reigned at Sebennytos, on the Damietta branch of the Nile in Lower Egypt, about 400 years B.C. (AP Photo)
FILE - This early 1930s file photo shows actress Clara Bow, Hollywood's original "It" girl, in New York City. A cache of 75 long-lost silent films uncovered in the New Zealand Film Archive vault, including the only known copy of a drama by legendary director John Ford, is being sent back to the United States to be restored. Among the movies found in storage are a copy of Ford's "Upstream," the earliest surviving movie by comic actor and director Mabel Normand and a period drama starring 1920s screen icon Clara Bow. (AP Photo/File)
** APN ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, JAN. 1 **Ana de la Merced Guimaraes shows human bones and other objects founds in the foundations of her home, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Nov. 30, 2005. Ana de la Merced Guimaraes was remodeling her 19th century home in Rio's old Gamboa district when laborers found thousands of human bones. Guimaraes discovered that her house was sitting on the Cemiterio dos Pretos Novos _Portuguese for Cemetery of New Blacks _ a crude burying ground for African slaves, that historians had thought was lost. (AP Photo/Renzo Gostoli)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY PAULINE FROISSART A partial view taken on August 8, 2012, shows shelves of items at the 200-year-old Lost and Found center (Objets trouvés) in Paris, one of the biggest in the world, located 36, Morillons street in Paris. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURE (Photo credit should read LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/GettyImages)
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA - OCTOBER 22: Photographs of missing men from Srebrenica are displayed in the office of the Srebrenica Widow's Association October 22, 2002 in Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina. The Association is working to have a memorial to these lost men and teens as young as 16-years-old built in Srebrenica. It is widely accepted that over 7,000 men were executed and buried in mass graves after Serb forces overran the Muslim enclave of Srebrenica in July 1995. Exhumation of these graves around Bosnia and the Republika Srbska continues. (Photo by Roger Lemoyne/Getty Images)
READING, PA - APRIL 9: Relic hunter John Blue returns a civil war era ring he found to the descendants of its' rightful owner on April, 09, 2013 in Reading, PA. Pictured, John Blue, left, gives the ring to Ernie Schlegel over the headstone of the man who lost it on the home from Appomatix. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
***EXCLUSIVE*** KHARKIV, UKRAINE - DECEMBER 15: Peter at the entrance to his home is pictured on December 15, 2011 on the north edge of Kharkiv, Ukraine. Peter, an orphan, had found a foster home with his brother, but disagreements and his love for Sasha drove him to live underground. Peter has also contracted AIDS. In June 2012 football fans from across Europe will descend upon cities in Poland and the Ukraine for the eagerly anticipated Euro 2012 tournament. But hidden on city back streets, in abandoned buildings and even underground are a lost generation of up to 130,000 street children in the Ukraine living in Dickensian squalor. While England footballers like Rooney and Lampard will travel between the two countries in first class luxury, children as young as eleven are seen wandering the streets begging for food. Others turn to pickpocketing, drug abuse and in the most extreme cases, prostitution. Father Vitaliy, of the Depaul Kharkiv charity, has spent the past five years helping over 700 street children in the city. With the help of UK-based charity, Mary's Meals, Depaul Kharkiv support 154 street children by providing them with a nutritious daily meal. There is an estimated 524 street children in the city. Father Vitaliy hopes 2012 will bring a dramatic change for the street children of Kharkiv with much needed help from the Ukrainian government who have pledged to work with Depaul Kharkiv to tackle the problem. PHOTOGRAPH BY Brcroft Media /Barcoft Media via Getty Images
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