Next-Gen: Just for Americans?

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It seems like everyone stateside is having fun with their new consoles, but the rest of the world? Not so much. US Gamer's Pete Davison explores the myopic world of next-gen - and why that needs to change.

Have you got a PlayStation 4 and/or an Xbox One? How are you liking them?

One thing that's abundantly clear when it comes to both systems is that they're both primarily built for an American audience. This is sound business sense, of course, particularly when a significant number of today's big publishers do a hefty proportion of their business in the United States, but there's a point where it becomes less desirable, and that's when gamers in other countries are getting an inferior experience.

We've reached that point already with both Xbox One and PlayStation 4 -- and the latter isn't even out in some territories just yet. There's a world of gamers outside America, next-gen; please don't forget about them.

Xbox One and the Mysterious Case of 50Hz Judder

The Xbox One has resurrected a TV-related issue that most people had thought was long-dead: the difference in TV standards between the United States and Europe.
If you grew up with pre-HD consoles you may well be familiar with this issue already, particularly if you ever tried to import games from Europe: standard definition American TVs effectively run at 480i resolution at a refresh rate of 60Hz; European standard definition TVs, meanwhile, run at 576i at a refresh rate of 50Hz. European console games right up through the PS2 era often got a raw deal, with many games running more slowly and/or with significant black borders at the top and bottom of the screen where the extra pixels of the 576i resolution simply weren't being used. Some developers were better than others at porting to 50Hz territories; others provided a 60Hz option for those with more modern televisions that supported the 60Hz/480i standard. And sometimes no effort was made whatsoever, which is why if you play Final Fantasy X in Europe, Tidus looks like he's running through treacle...

Read the rest of the article at US Gamer.

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