HyperSolar Moves Closer to Low Cost Solar Hydrogen Water-Splitting by Reaching the 1.0 Volt Mileston

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HyperSolar Moves Closer to Low Cost Solar Hydrogen Water-Splitting by Reaching the 1.0 Volt Milestone

Company also extends sponsored research agreement with University of California Santa Barbara after achieving dramatic breakthroughs in its novel low cost solar cell component

SANTA BARBARA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- HyperSolar, Inc. (OTC:HYSR), the developer of a breakthrough technology to produce renewable hydrogen using sunlight and any source of water, today announced that its artificial photosynthesis technology is now capable of producing 1.0 volt open circuit voltage for use in direct solar hydrogen production. This achievement represents a dramatic voltage increase over the previous 0.2 volt just 8 months ago, and 0.75 volt just 3 months ago.

It is well known that the theoretical voltage for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen is 1.23 volts, and approximately 1.5 volts in real-world systems. Achieving 1.5 volts using inexpensive solar cells has eluded the world. For example, silicon solar cells are the most inexpensive and abundant, but their 0.7 volt is not enough to split water. Commercially available high voltage solar cells are unfortunately too expensive for use in hydrogen production.

"Our cutting-edge research program at the University of California Santa Barbara led by Dr. Syed Mubeen Hussaini continues to make impressive progress," stated Tim Young, CEO of HyperSolar. "The 1.0 volt milestone is very exciting in that it provides us with a clear and encouraging roadmap to reach the 1.5 volts needed for water splitting. The semi-conductor materials used are very inexpensive, which gives us confidence that a low cost system is possible. The process to make this novel solar cell is equally exciting in that it is a simple solutions-based chemistry process. It does not require conventional expensive semiconductor processes and facilities. It was literally made in a beaker."

Mr. Young continued, "Recently, Honda and General Motors announced a partnership to bring hydrogen cars to the mass market by 2020. While this is great news for our industry, a major unsolved piece of the puzzle is the low cost production of renewable hydrogen for fueling stations. We believe that producing renewable hydrogen anywhere there is water and sunlight is the key to realizing a cost-effective hydrogen economy of fuel cell vehicles. We envision that fueling stations can be built next to self-contained solar hydrogen production plants using our low cost technology."

HyperSolar's research is centered on developing a low-cost and submersible hydrogen production particle that can split water molecules under the sun, emulating the core functions of photosynthesis. Each particle is a complete hydrogen generator that contains a novel high voltage solar cell bonded to chemical catalysts by a proprietary encapsulation coating. A video of an early proof-of-concept prototype can be viewed at http://hypersolar.com/application.php. HyperSolar recently extended its sponsored research agreement with UCSB to further the development.

While 1.0 volt may not be commercially viable for water splitting, it is viable in high value photo-catalysis application in the chemical industry, such as bromine extraction from wastewater. HyperSolar intends to explore those opportunities as part of its overall commercialization strategy.

About HyperSolar, Inc.

HyperSolar is developing a breakthrough, low cost technology to make renewable hydrogen using sunlight and any source of water, including seawater and wastewater. Unlike hydrocarbon fuels, such as oil, coal and natural gas, where carbon dioxide and other contaminants are released into the atmosphere when used, hydrogen fuel usage produces pure water as the only byproduct. By optimizing the science of water electrolysis at the nano-level, our low cost nanoparticles mimic photosynthesis to efficiently use sunlight to separate hydrogen from water, to produce environmentally friendly renewable hydrogen. Using our low cost method to produce renewable hydrogen, we intend to enable a world of distributed hydrogen production for renewable electricity and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. To learn more about HyperSolar, please visit our website at http://www.HyperSolar.com.

Safe Harbor Statement

Matters discussed in this press release contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. When used in this press release, the words "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "may," "intend," "expect" and similar expressions identify such forward-looking statements. Actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those contemplated, expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements contained herein, and while expected, there is no guarantee that we will attain the aforementioned anticipated developmental milestones. These forward-looking statements are based largely on the expectations of the Company and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. These include, but are not limited to, risks and uncertainties associated with: the impact of economic, competitive and other factors affecting the Company and its operations, markets, product, and distributor performance, the impact on the national and local economies resulting from terrorist actions, and U.S. actions subsequently; and other factors detailed in reports filed by the Company.


HyperSolar, Inc.
Tim Young
Office: 805-966-6566

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  California


The article HyperSolar Moves Closer to Low Cost Solar Hydrogen Water-Splitting by Reaching the 1.0 Volt Milestone originally appeared on Fool.com.

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